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By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 23, 1997
EVERY NOW AND then, some topic seems to grab readers' attention. A couple of years ago it was roofs; this time around it's heat pumps.A reader in Columbia wrote to ask whether to take advantage of a chance to connect to existing gas lines and trade in his heat pump for a gas furnace. His heat pump is relatively new, but the air-handling system is two decades old.Most people who want to trade in the heat pump feel that it doesn't deliver warm-enough air. Although the air coming out of the ducts is 85 degrees, it's colder than body or skin temperature, so it can feel cold.
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NEWS
By Lane Page and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
S ince they came out of the forest, our ancestors must have looked up to the skies for warm sunlight and cooling breezes. A few, looking down at natural steam vents and hot springs, found themselves able to take advantage of the earth itself for geothermal heat. Skipping to the present, when renewable energy tax credits, rebates and grants have refueled a serious interest in the underground energy source, this heat pump that uses water instead of air has taken a foothold in Howard County as a result of its long-term financial benefits, even after the demise of a local tax incentive.  Those who've gone with geothermal energy are pleased with their decisions.
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NEWS
March 11, 1993
* Ellicott City: 10300 block of Wetherburn Road: A heat pump and a furnace were stolen between 5 p.m. Friday and 7 a.m. Saturday from a home under construction.9200 block of Baltimore National Pike: A blue 1992 Chevrolet Blazer was stolen from the Chatham Mall between Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Cash for Appliances just got cooler. Starting Friday, Marylanders can apply for $500 rebates on new central air conditioners under the popular federal program backed by stimulus dollars. State officials announced Monday that they plan to extend rebates to purchases of energy-efficient models in four new categories. State residents replacing old appliances also will be able to apply for $500 rebates on air-source heat pumps, $100 for freezers and $25 for room air conditioners. Only purchases of Energy Star-rated models made after Friday will be eligible, according to the Maryland Energy Administration, which runs the state's program.
NEWS
March 26, 2001
Annapolis company wins $64,000 grant for heat pump work Energy Concepts Company, based in Annapolis, received a $64,000 grant to work with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County on a controller for a new heat-activated heat pump that will reduce pollution. Donald C. Erickson, president of Energy Concepts, said the heat pump will provide a 33 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and in fuel consumption during winter, and a 10 percent reduction in summer compared to traditional heat pumps.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | October 27, 2002
When heating systems started firing up the first cold nights of the season, a lot of people began to think about the expense of heating their houses. There were the unfortunate people who found that their heat didn't work when they turned it on. They had to open their wallets before the first fuel bill arrived for a service call to get furnace, boiler or heat pump up and running. And some had to dig much deeper, as this turned out to be the year for major repair or replacement of their heating systems.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff writer | December 6, 1992
BOWIE -- It's been dubbed the "garbage house" -- because old plastic milk jugs and newspapers were used to build it -- but it looks like a typical upscale suburban home.It's the National Association of Home Builders' "resource conservation home," a 3,600-square-foot model unveiled last week to demonstrate energy-efficient building methods. The goal is to conserve resources by using recycled materials and saving energy, for example, by using alternative energy sources to heat the house.The home, which cost $200,000 to build, will be open to visitors for about a year before being put up for sale.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
"Buyer beware" signs posted in two Hawk Ridge Farm homes must come down or the owners may face civil lawsuits by the builder."Unless the signs are permanently removed from your window within 24 hours," attorneys for Powers Homes told the residents in a letter dated Feb. 8, the lawyers "will take immediate action in the Circuit Court for Carroll County."Rose Ann Fischer received her letter Thursday and immediately posted two more signs in her bay window."I am not letting them win," said Ms. Fischer, who said she has lodged innumerable complaints with the builder since she moved into her $247,000 Caracara Court home in November 1992.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 15, 1992
It's a rare homeowner who can get through an entire winter without some sort of heating-system problem. There are plenty of things that can go wrong, and experts don't always agree on the problem, much less the solution. And sometimes, even when the heating system is working fine, the house has a problem.That's what a Marriottsville couple wondered recently when they wrote in asking about a humidity problem."Help," they said, "we're confused. We recently purchased a 4-year-old home equipped with a heat pump.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | October 22, 1994
Call it the fossil-fuel dilemma. If you're renovating, building a new house, or just tired of feeling cold all winter, you may long for an alternative to the ubiquitous heat pump, that clever device that throws out "warm" air that's cooler than your body temperature, and relies on expensive electric-resistance heat for supplement when it's really cold outside.Traditionally, fossil-fuel systems required a chimney. Fine if you've already got one, but difficult and expensive to retrofit, and an expensive "extra" in a new house.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | October 27, 2002
When heating systems started firing up the first cold nights of the season, a lot of people began to think about the expense of heating their houses. There were the unfortunate people who found that their heat didn't work when they turned it on. They had to open their wallets before the first fuel bill arrived for a service call to get furnace, boiler or heat pump up and running. And some had to dig much deeper, as this turned out to be the year for major repair or replacement of their heating systems.
NEWS
March 26, 2001
Annapolis company wins $64,000 grant for heat pump work Energy Concepts Company, based in Annapolis, received a $64,000 grant to work with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County on a controller for a new heat-activated heat pump that will reduce pollution. Donald C. Erickson, president of Energy Concepts, said the heat pump will provide a 33 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and in fuel consumption during winter, and a 10 percent reduction in summer compared to traditional heat pumps.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | September 20, 1998
YOU KNOW FALL is approaching, in most parts of the country, when you can't decide from one day to the next whether you need to turn on the furnace or the air conditioner. That's typically the case if you use a traditional HVAC system (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), with a furnace and separate air conditioner.In the future, it's likely that the HVAC system will do the monitoring, checking the temperature outdoors and inside your house and turning on whatever devices will make the appropriate adjustments.
BUSINESS
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 1998
When the staff at Jamestown Builders initially approached John Shin about installing a geothermal heat-pump system in the home he was buying at Jamestown's Eastern View subdivision in Fulton, Shin was skeptical.For starters, Shin wasn't exactly sure what the technology entailed. And the words "heat pump" raised red flags "because I would never have a regular heat pump system in my home," he said. "I just don't like them."In fact, a geothermal heat pump is not a regular heat pump system. Traditional heat pumps use electricity to force air around in an effort to heat and cool a home or building.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
A heating and cooling system being installed at the New Windsor post office may be the way most people will heat and cool their houses in the 21st century.Geothermal heating and cooling is part of the U.S. Postal Service's response to a congressional order to reduce energy consumption in all government buildings by 20 percent below 1985 levels by 2000. In the Baltimore District, the Postal Service has begun replacing obsolete or broken heating and air-conditioning systems with geothermal heat pumps that draw heat in winter and coolness in summer from the earth.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 1997
NEW YORK -- On 64th Street just east of Central Park, limestone and marble mansions owned by Edgar Bronfman Jr., Ivana Trump, Gianni Versace and other notables line a block busy with black Rolls-Royces and stretch limousines.Now the block is also home to the two deepest holes in the city, each deeper than the World Trade Center is tall.The holes were drilled 1,500 feet into bedrock in April to tap the stored energy in the rock for an $8 million building being constructed by Theodore Kheel, the labor lawyer, philanthropist and now environmental showman.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
A heating and cooling system being installed at the New Windsor post office may be the way most people will heat and cool their houses in the 21st century.Geothermal heating and cooling is part of the U.S. Postal Service's response to a congressional order to reduce energy consumption in all government buildings by 20 percent below 1985 levels by 2000. In the Baltimore District, the Postal Service has begun replacing obsolete or broken heating and air-conditioning systems with geothermal heat pumps that draw heat in winter and coolness in summer from the earth.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 23, 1997
EVERY NOW AND then, some topic seems to grab readers' attention. A couple of years ago it was roofs; this time around it's heat pumps.A reader in Columbia wrote to ask whether to take advantage of a chance to connect to existing gas lines and trade in his heat pump for a gas furnace. His heat pump is relatively new, but the air-handling system is two decades old.Most people who want to trade in the heat pump feel that it doesn't deliver warm-enough air. Although the air coming out of the ducts is 85 degrees, it's colder than body or skin temperature, so it can feel cold.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 2, 1997
A FEW YEARS ago, heat pumps were all the rage. Utility companies were promoting them, and builders were installing them in every new house. They seemed to hold out the promise of efficient heating and cooling at rates that were cheaper than other forms of electric heat, such as baseboard heaters.They're still being promoted in some places, but builders,especially in the mid-Atlantic, are touting "gas heat" in their developments.What's the truth about heat pumps?Do they work?Do they fulfill the promise?
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