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Heat Cramps

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NEWS
July 16, 2000
Overexertion in extreme heat, especially without constant intake of water, can be life threatening. Heat plus humidity is bad enough; add direct sun, and things can worsen quickly. Maladies to watch for: Heat cramps: Muscular pain, usually involving the abdominal or leg muscles. Symptoms: You'll know; cramps hurt. Heat exhaustion: A form of shock sometimes compounded by clothing that prevents the body from cooling normally. Fluid loss that decreases blood flow to vital organs causes the problem.
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TRAVEL
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
The water's lapping at your freshly manicured toes. The sun's shining down on your back and your Blackberry is most definitely turned off. It's a glorious beach moment. But sun seekers beware: A dazzling day at the shore can be the perfect summer escape, but don't let the relaxation put you off your guard. When it comes to sun, there can be too much of a good thing. Heat exhaustion and sunburn are not just minor annoyances; they can be harmful. Heat-related illness, ranging from cramps to life-threatening heatstroke, happens when the body struggles to cool itself.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
Marylanders might be feeling wilted by the recent spell of 90-degree-plus temperatures, but for some workers the heat can be more than uncomfortable -- it can be dangerous.Craig Lowry, chief of enforcement for Maryland Occupational Safety and Health, said the riskiest jobs for heat-related illness include work in steel mills, asphalt paving and roofing. He described three stages of heat-related illness:*Heat stress, characterized by symptoms such as dizziness, headache, nausea.*Heat cramps, in which the major muscles lose fluids and contract painfully.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
COLLEGE PARK - During the season, Maryland left guard Todd Wike is as sturdy as they come, having started 32 of the Terps' past 33 games. Try as he might, however, the senior hasn't had much luck with uninterrupted preseason camps, mostly because of dehydration that leads to cramping. He missed three practices earlier this week. "So far, I've only had two IVs," he said, considering the figure a small one relative to his first four years here. "Last year, I had one almost every day during the first two weeks of practice."
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | July 27, 1993
It's not only our lawns that suffer during the summer heat. Each year in the United States, some 4,000 heat-related deaths are reported.As it is possible that we'll experience another heat wave before summer's end, I asked Julius G. K. Goepp, M.D., assistant director of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, for his advice about coping with the heat.Q: What happens to our bodies when it gets very hot?When the temperature outside is cooler than our body temperature, heat is drawn naturally from the body to the cooler air around it. When outside temperatures are greater than our body temperature, our body heat is dissipated through perspiration.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
Lt. Alan E. Bull, a supervisor of paramedics, stands on the second floor of the Oldtown Fire Station on Hillen Street. He is hot and uncomfortable."No air is in this building," Bull says. On that day, yesterday, the temperature reached a record high of 99. He is 5 feet, 6 inches tall with a mustache. He supervises the paramedics who work on the west side of town.The lights are turned off in some parts of the brick fire station to help keep employees cool. Some employees use ice packs."It will be another month before the air conditioner is repaired," Bull says, adding that the condition is made worse because the windows don't open.
TRAVEL
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
The water's lapping at your freshly manicured toes. The sun's shining down on your back and your Blackberry is most definitely turned off. It's a glorious beach moment. But sun seekers beware: A dazzling day at the shore can be the perfect summer escape, but don't let the relaxation put you off your guard. When it comes to sun, there can be too much of a good thing. Heat exhaustion and sunburn are not just minor annoyances; they can be harmful. Heat-related illness, ranging from cramps to life-threatening heatstroke, happens when the body struggles to cool itself.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
Lt. Alan E. Bull, a supervisor of paramedics, stands on the second floor of the Oldtown Fire Station on Hillen Street. He is hot and uncomfortable."No air is in this building," Bull says. On that day, yesterday, the temperature reached a record high of 99. He is 5 feet, 6 inches tall with a mustache. He supervises the paramedics who work on the west side of town.The lights are turned off in some parts of the brick fire station to help keep employees cool. Some employees use ice packs."It will be another month before the air conditioner is repaired," Bull says, adding that the situation is made worsebecause the windows don't open.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1995
Marylanders could only steam at the weather yesterday as high humidity combined with record-breaking temperatures to produce dangerous conditions.The hot, heavy air cooked up to 102 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Airport at 2:20 p.m., shattering a record for the date of 98 degrees set in 1988.But with humidity exceeding 50 percent, it felt far worse -- with a "heat index" reaching 124 degrees at BWI and perhaps even higher levels in Baltimore, where WBAL-TV recorded a high of 104 degrees at its Television Hill monitoring station.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
COLLEGE PARK - During the season, Maryland left guard Todd Wike is as sturdy as they come, having started 32 of the Terps' past 33 games. Try as he might, however, the senior hasn't had much luck with uninterrupted preseason camps, mostly because of dehydration that leads to cramping. He missed three practices earlier this week. "So far, I've only had two IVs," he said, considering the figure a small one relative to his first four years here. "Last year, I had one almost every day during the first two weeks of practice."
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Overexertion in extreme heat, especially without constant intake of water, can be life threatening. Heat plus humidity is bad enough; add direct sun, and things can worsen quickly. Maladies to watch for: Heat cramps: Muscular pain, usually involving the abdominal or leg muscles. Symptoms: You'll know; cramps hurt. Heat exhaustion: A form of shock sometimes compounded by clothing that prevents the body from cooling normally. Fluid loss that decreases blood flow to vital organs causes the problem.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1995
Marylanders could only steam at the weather yesterday as high humidity combined with record-breaking temperatures to produce dangerous conditions.The hot, heavy air cooked up to 102 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Airport at 2:20 p.m., shattering a record for the date of 98 degrees set in 1988.But with humidity exceeding 50 percent, it felt far worse -- with a "heat index" reaching 124 degrees at BWI and perhaps even higher levels in Baltimore, where WBAL-TV recorded a high of 104 degrees at its Television Hill monitoring station.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | July 27, 1993
It's not only our lawns that suffer during the summer heat. Each year in the United States, some 4,000 heat-related deaths are reported.As it is possible that we'll experience another heat wave before summer's end, I asked Julius G. K. Goepp, M.D., assistant director of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, for his advice about coping with the heat.Q: What happens to our bodies when it gets very hot?When the temperature outside is cooler than our body temperature, heat is drawn naturally from the body to the cooler air around it. When outside temperatures are greater than our body temperature, our body heat is dissipated through perspiration.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
Lt. Alan E. Bull, a supervisor of paramedics, stands on the second floor of the Oldtown Fire Station on Hillen Street. He is hot and uncomfortable."No air is in this building," Bull says. On that day, yesterday, the temperature reached a record high of 99. He is 5 feet, 6 inches tall with a mustache. He supervises the paramedics who work on the west side of town.The lights are turned off in some parts of the brick fire station to help keep employees cool. Some employees use ice packs."It will be another month before the air conditioner is repaired," Bull says, adding that the condition is made worse because the windows don't open.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
Lt. Alan E. Bull, a supervisor of paramedics, stands on the second floor of the Oldtown Fire Station on Hillen Street. He is hot and uncomfortable."No air is in this building," Bull says. On that day, yesterday, the temperature reached a record high of 99. He is 5 feet, 6 inches tall with a mustache. He supervises the paramedics who work on the west side of town.The lights are turned off in some parts of the brick fire station to help keep employees cool. Some employees use ice packs."It will be another month before the air conditioner is repaired," Bull says, adding that the situation is made worsebecause the windows don't open.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
Marylanders might be feeling wilted by the recent spell of 90-degree-plus temperatures, but for some workers the heat can be more than uncomfortable -- it can be dangerous.Craig Lowry, chief of enforcement for Maryland Occupational Safety and Health, said the riskiest jobs for heat-related illness include work in steel mills, asphalt paving and roofing. He described three stages of heat-related illness:*Heat stress, characterized by symptoms such as dizziness, headache, nausea.*Heat cramps, in which the major muscles lose fluids and contract painfully.
NEWS
By Winyan Soo Hoo and Winyan Soo Hoo,Special to baltimoresun.com | June 14, 2005
With the mercury topping 90 degrees today, two area school systems sent pupils home early and officials advised people to be cautious if they planned to be outdoors for extended periods. Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va., said soaring temperatures combined with high humidity to produce even more sultry conditions than yesterday, with heat index values expected to near the 100-degree mark. A heat advisory was in effect until 6 p.m. for most of Maryland. "It is advisable to wear lightweight clothing to keep cool and maintain a safe body temperature," said Calvin Meadows, a hydrometeorological technician at the weather service.
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