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Heat And Humidity

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By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 20, 1993
Have you ever stashed crayons in the glove compartment of the car in the summer? When you pull them out later in the trip, all that's left is a sticky, gooey mess.If you left Preparation H suppositories on the front seat on a hot day, the same thing would happen. After all, they're designed to melt at body temperature. The temperature in a car can quickly top 100 degrees.Most medicine isn't like suppositories. If you take it out of the car when you get home from an hour or two of running errands, you probably won't see any difference.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Since people like to think fall is upon us once Labor Day passes and the humidity drops, making this week's burst of heat an Indian Summer. But there is a technical definition of the term, and this week's weather doesn't meet it. Sources from the National Weather Service to the Old Farmer's Almanac suggest that an Indian Summer has some very specific characteristics: Along with warm temperatures, hazy skies and little wind; ...
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NEWS
July 14, 2006
Did you know?-- The heat index is the temperature the body feels when heat and humidity are combined. - The Weather Channel
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Summer may technically be over with, but summer-like sticky weather is expected to last through the week in Baltimore. Dew points haven't fallen below 70 degrees at BWI Marshall Airport since Saturday. With temperatures only in the 70s and 80s mostly since then, that meant thick, wet air over Labor Day weekend. The dew point takes into account both the relative humidity and the air temperature, giving a better picture of how humidity feels -- and anything above about 65 feels pretty uncomfortable.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | June 26, 2008
Jeff Ehmsen moved to Baltimore from Southern California. "We pretty much never get thunderstorms there," he says. Since landing in Mobtown, he's "come to appreciate them as part of the seasonal cycles, but wondered what explains them." I love T-storms, too. Their beauty and drama are fueled by our heat and humidity. Moist air, buoyed by solar heating or clashing fronts, rises through colder air. The updrafts generate electric fields, lightning and thunder. Cooling aloft condenses water vapor, which falls as rain and hail.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | April 14, 2007
First, the offense took a vacation for most of the day against Virginia. The next week, the defense fell apart in the heat and humidity on a shocking afternoon in Chapel Hill, N.C. Then came a rough third-quarter stretch against Duke, on a day it failed to control two of the top scorers in the game. The reasons behind its growing frustration vary, but one thing is clear. Four weeks after it blew out Syracuse on the road with its most complete effort of the spring, the 10th-ranked Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team is scrambling to stave off the unimaginable at Homewood.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It's not just the heat, it's the humidity that's likely to cause much of the pain of global warming, meteorologists are realizing.Across a swath of the United States, the heat index, a measure of discomfort that takes into account heat and humidity, is expected to soar over the next 50 to 60 years, forecasters predict in the federal government's first study to take increased humidity into account.That could increase the yearly average number of heat-related deaths nationwide, now 1,200, to several thousand, one expert said.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff Jacques Kelly and Richard Irwin contributed to this story | July 1, 1991
Welcome to the first day of July, a respite from the withering heat and humidity of the last few days in the Baltimore metropolitan area.At 1 p.m., the temperature in the city was a bearable 81 degrees.Temperatures were predicted in the low to mid-80s today with much drier air, said Bill Miller, a forecaster for the National Weather Service.So much for nice days.By tomorrow, the dreaded heat and humidity will return and should continue into the long Fourth of July weekend.A warm front is scheduled to move into the state by Tuesday evening, bringing with it hot and moist air. By the holiday, temperatures should be in the mid-90s or higher, the National Weather Service said.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1997
Art lovers apparently were oblivious to the muggy conditions that accompanied Artscape this weekend, turning out in numbers that are likely to top the record of 1.5 million people who attended last summer."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
Heat and humidity are once again rolling across the mid-Atlantic states, causing another round of urban heat advisories and Code Red ozone alerts in Maryland today and worsening a drought already considered the second-worst in state history.Yesterday's high of 96 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Airport was not a record, but weather forecasters expect more of the same, with highs reaching at least 90 degrees until the end of the week.Forecasters are worried about drought, not the heat.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | July 26, 2012
With a daytime high of 98 degrees in Owings Mills according to Weather.com, staying cool at Ravens training camp was a challenge for the players and coaches on the practice fields. Wide receivers Torrey Smith and LaQuan Williams both dealt with leg cramps caused by dehydration, and at one point, free safety Ed Reed wondered aloud where the I.V. drips were. Fans who attended Thursday afternoon's session were treated to popsicles. Still, coach John Harbaugh said the hot and humid weather is a good barometer for how diligent the players were during the offseason.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Tim McFadden stepped outside his glass-blowing studio to cool off. At 3 p.m., the temperature along that particular stretch of Eastern Avenue was only 96 degrees. "It feels like it's about 70 out here," he says. And no, McFadden wasn't joking. Inside his studio, the thermometer on the "cool" wall, the one farthest from the kilns, was pushing 120 Fahrenheit. Directly in front of the roaring ovens, where McFadden spends much of his afternoons and evenings spinning molten glass the color of cotton candy onto metal rods, it was even hotter.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2011
Temperatures crowded 100 degrees and kept Central Maryland in the steamer Wednesday. The summerlike swelter closed classrooms, opened city pools and hydrants, and sent residents in search of whatever air-conditioned spaces they could find. The mercury at BWI Marshall Airport reached 99 degrees at 2:38 p.m., beating the 12-year-old record of 97 degrees for the date. It was the fourth 90-plus record high in 10 days. High humidity drove the Heat Index — a measure of how hard it is for the body to cool itself — to a suffocating 106 degrees.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
Summer arrived in Maryland Monday with temperatures already well into the 90s, and forecasters advised residents and public health officials to expect the heat, humidity and bad air quality to persist all week with sweltering numbers more typical of mid-July. Health authorities grappling with the first extended heat wave of the year stood ready to reopen cooling centers in Baltimore. The power company braced for rising demand as air conditioners spun up across the region. And anyone who had to be outdoors just sweated it out and wished for something better.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | July 11, 2009
Corine Schramke isn't complaining. The Baltimore area has not experienced much extreme summer weather thus far, so the Ellicott City resident has enjoyed more time on her deck. Her utility bills are lower, too. "In the late afternoon and evening, I throw open all the windows and get the fresh air in, and it's been wonderful," said Schramke, who works from home. "This is an enormously pleasant surprise this year." Temperatures at the weather station at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport didn't climb above 90 degrees at all in May or June, according to National Weather Service data, defying the area's reputation for sweltering summer heat and humidity.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | June 26, 2008
Jeff Ehmsen moved to Baltimore from Southern California. "We pretty much never get thunderstorms there," he says. Since landing in Mobtown, he's "come to appreciate them as part of the seasonal cycles, but wondered what explains them." I love T-storms, too. Their beauty and drama are fueled by our heat and humidity. Moist air, buoyed by solar heating or clashing fronts, rises through colder air. The updrafts generate electric fields, lightning and thunder. Cooling aloft condenses water vapor, which falls as rain and hail.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Those two "H's" - heat and humidity - that conspire to make Baltimore summers so very special could soon be joined by a cousin: hurricane. A not-so-holy trinity, most everyone would agree, is upon us. The temperature soared yesterday afternoon to 93 and the humidity reached a sticky 94 percent, conspiring for a heat index of 103. Today and tomorrow look like repeats of yesterday, with chances of thunderstorms and showers. Also, air quality was predicted to be unhealthy over the weekend for those with respiratory illnesses, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Nicole Fuller and Frank D. Roylance and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTERS | August 8, 2007
Maryland's midsummer slog through simmering heat and soaking humidity dragged on yesterday with only a meager hint of relief in the forecast. "It's a relatively stagnant pattern, with no strong fronts to help alleviate the situation," said meteorologist Francis Kredensor at Penn State Weather Communications in State College, Pa. "It's just the summertime doldrums." We should see more of the same today, with a forecast high around 97 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
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