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NEWS
September 29, 1995
COMPARED TO colonial times, today's cooks have it relatively easy. Maryland may have lost a plentiful supply of many once-indigenous herbs and animals -- certainly the famed terrapin is nearly impossible to find -- but at least contemporary cooks do not have to worry about cooking at an open hearth. If you insist, however, you can.Mary Sue Pagan Latini, of Ferndale, has authored an intriguing 159-page book, "At the Hearth: Early American Recipes," which should be available at many book stores and museum shops from the American Literary Press Inc. for $14.95.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano-Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
Joe Graziose and his family have recently moved into their fourth home at the same location — the Ritz-Carlton Residences along Baltimore's Inner Harbor. "We've tested locations on all fronts of the building," he said. "Our last unit overlooked Federal Hill. " It is not that the Grazioses are fickle or hard to please. On the contrary. As senior vice president of RXR Realty, developers of the Ritz-Carlton Residences in Baltimore, as well as one of its investors, Graziose has always opened his and wife Jackie's home to prospective buyers looking for a unit in the upscale complex.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
A small band of protesters, some on foot and others in wheelchairs, besieged a red brick building in the heart of residential Lansdowne yesterday. Singing, chanting and rapping on windows, the demonstrators complained that officials at the Hearth Inc. program for homeless women have virtually imprisoned a disabled tenant in her apartment.More than three hours later, the protesters had failed to get tenant Gail Riddic moved to an apartment with a ramp for her wheelchair.Still, they took satisfaction in presuming that the shelter's director had avoided them only by retreating to his basement office -- stuck there, they believed, just as Riddic has been stuck in her second-floor apartment.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Three years of digging at a prehistoric Indian site in Anne Arundel County has unearthed the oldest structures and human habitations in Maryland and is making this bluff above the Patuxent River one of the most important archaeological sites in the Mid-Atlantic. Last week, archaeologists learned from carbon-14 dating that a stone hearth they uncovered this summer was last used 9,290 years ago. That makes the site, called Pig Point, twice as old as the earliest carbon-dated human habitation found previously in Maryland.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2000
Baltimore March 6-10: Optical Society of America fiber-optics communications conference and exhibit. Convention Center. Contact: Cindy Gady, 202-223-8130. Estimated attendance: 6,000 March 10-12 Builderburg Group Publications construction business and technical conference and expo. Convention Center. Contact: Donna Ladd, 802-434-4747. Estimated attendance: 1,000 March 16-20: Hearth Products Association hearth and home expo, Convention Center. Contact: Joan Letchworth, 703-522-0086. Estimated attendance: 10,000 March 24-25: Mary Kay Cosmetics career conference, Convention Center.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2000
Baltimore March 16-20: Hearth Products Association hearth and home expo, Convention Center. Contact: Joan Letchworth, 703-522-0086. Estimated attendance: 10,000 March 24-25: Mary Kay Cosmetics career conference, Convention Center. Contact: Rosemary Hall, 972-687-5942. Estimated attendance: 2,000 March 26-30: Clean Rooms Interational regional show. Convention Center. Contact: Candy Fagan, 770-973-2266. Estimated attendance: 3,000 Information The Sun lists selected conventions of general interest or with exhibits open to the public from those provided by the Baltimore Area Convention & Visitors Association.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2000
Baltimore Feb. 22-27 American Craft Enterprises conference and craft fair, Convention Center. Contact: Jo Ann Brown, 914-883-6100. Estimated attendance: 25,000 March 1-2 Maryland Staffing Association convention, BWI Marriott, 1743 W. Nursery Road, Linthicum. Contact: Kathy LaMartina, 410-665-3664. Registration deadline is Feb. 23. Estimated attendance: 200 March 3-10 Optical Society of America fiber-optics communications conference and exhibit. Convention Center. Contact: Cindy Gady, 202-223-8130.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
The kitchen window opens to sunshine and late-spring breezes, to the murmur of cars and trucks speeding through a highway's workweek bustle. Gail Riddic can feel the fresh air and hear the traffic. But day after day she sits in her wheelchair, separated from the outside world by a steep flight of stairs.She wonders why she can't live in the downstairs apartment -- the one with the wheelchair ramp. The woman who lives there says she would have agreed months ago to a swap. But their landlord, a nonprofit corporation that runs a transitional housing program for the homeless, says no."
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | November 25, 1990
A taste of early Baltimore -- in more ways than one -- is available at the 1840 House, courtesy of the Baltimore City Life Museums' new venture, "Journeys Through Time." Open-hearth cooking plays a part in each of three different programs, which offer a variety of 19th century-style entertainments.The programs, designed for groups of no more than 16 people, are conducted by 1840 House staff members, who will entertain their guests in period dress."An Evening in 1840," open to participants 10 and older, centers around the preparation of a period meal on the open hearth of the living history museum's candle-lit kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kenya Brown | November 28, 1996
Old days, old waysIf one day of giving thanks for the holiday season isn't enough, the Historic St. Mary's City outdoor museum will present its post-Thanksgiving event, "Giving Thanks: Hearth and Home in Early Maryland," tomorrow and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.The 17th century exploration day includes hearth cooking demonstrations. Other hands-on opportunities will be given at the Woodland Indian Hamlet and the Spray Tobacco Plantation.The Maryland Dove will set sail to the colonies and the galley will prepare the "ship's fare" with bean pottage, cooked greens and hard tack.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
Nestled not far from downtown Towson's high-rise apartments, condominiums, multi-level university buildings and dormitories sits the quiet, settled neighborhood of Stoneleigh. Narrow streets meander up and around old trees, lined by houses of many styles. Front gardens — some blanketed in ivy and protected by picket fences — unfold before visitors like the opening scene of a Frank Capra film or the backdrop of a Currier & Ives painting. Stoneleigh homeowner Fred Stringfellow calls it "a traditional and one-of-a-kind neighborhood.
NEWS
By Clare McHugh and Clare McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Novel GOODNIGHT NOBODY Jennifer Weiner Atria Books / 372 pages PARENTS EVERYWHERE WILL RECOGNIZE the title of JenniferWeiner's fourth novel as a phrase from the perennially popular readaloud- at-bedtime children's classic, Goodnight Moon. And it signals Weiner's new focus: the struggles of the stayat- home mother who loves her children but feels like a nobody now that she's in exile from the professionalworld. Weiner, possessing a warm heart and a wickedly funny eye for social interaction, has earned legions of fans with her previous books.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 29, 2005
ON COLD winter weekends like this one, I long to curl up in front of a roaring fire. Theoretically, I would do this to warm up. An open fire, with logs blazing, is after all, a source of considerable heat. The trouble is that much of this heat goes up the chimney. I found this out when I looked into the science behind the romance of the blazing open fire. I wish I hadn't. There are some bedrock beliefs that are best undisturbed. For me, one of them is that burning chunks of wood in an open fire is a good way to heat up the house.
NEWS
April 25, 2004
Union and Confederate armies will clash at the Carroll County Farm Museum during the annual Civil War Living History Encampment from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and May 2. Various regiments from the North and South will camp on the grounds and demonstrate forgotten lifestyles. Camp families will cook over campfires and go about their daily lives as they would have during theCivil War. Several new activities are being offered this year. A garden talk, "From Garden to Hearth - 1860s Kitchen Gardening," will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2003
Along a graveled drive buried deep in the Green Spring Valley, bright pink rhododendron point the way to the stone and gray-shingled home of Rebecca Hoffberger. Hoffberger, founder and executive director of the American Visionary Art Museum at the Inner Harbor, stands in the wood- canopied, flagstone breezeway that connects the house to polished gardens of Asian influence. A pond with trickles of water dancing on rocks provides shelter for overgrown goldfish. Wooden benches placed among exotic plants offer restful contemplation.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 12, 2003
BOSTON - After all is said and done, I'm still trying to figure out how he got away with it. I don't mean how he got away with hawking virtue and hiding vice in public. William J. Bennett isn't the first in the crowd to pull that off. I can't figure out how he got away with it at home. Let me put it this way. If my husband had fed $8 million into the slot machines, I might have noticed before I read it in Newsweek or The Washington Monthly. A few days ago, some folks at the casinos dropped a dime on Mr. Bennett and passed a passel of documents to reporters.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
LAST SUNDAY, I was fortunate to be one of a group of 10 people who stepped back to the 19th century for a cooking workshop on an open hearth in the kitchen of the 1840 House, a Baltimore City Life Museum.Sue Latini, food historian and Ferndale resident, coached us as we learned the techniques to prepare a full-course meal. We fed the fire, peeled, cut and chopped ingredients and employed various cooking methods to turn out delicious dishes from the menu, "A Meal For A Fall Day."We used a reflector oven to roast a pork loin, and a dutch oven to bake corn bread and a molasses custard pie for dessert.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 2001
FERNDALE RESIDENT Sue Latini has brought her hearthside cooking workshops to the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House in Baltimore. Dressed in period clothing, with a fire properly prepared and blazing behind her, she teaches small groups what it was like to cook in early America. Besides learning what iron pot to use for the chicken with dumplings or how to pile coals on the Dutch oven lid for the fruit cobbler, participants are told about the background of the foods and what was available at the time.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
AFEW years ago, my friend Sue Latini and I sat down to plan a motor trip through Italy. We had one month to explore, and we loosely mapped out a route taking in major cities, hill towns and quaint villages. We read all we could about these areas ahead of time - the history, local customs, industry and the beautiful art and architecture. But one cannot travel the country without paying attention to and enjoying another important aspect - the food. We familiarized ourselves with the various regional cuisine, and found out things we should try, such as the mortadella in Bologna.
NEWS
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2002
A woman wearing a long, brown cotton dress is standing before an open hearth, stirring a cast-iron pot, when she suddenly jumps back and furiously shakes the skirt of her dress and long apron. The men and women gathered around her watch, surprised. They don't see any smoke and didn't hear the telltale pop of sparks, but Patricia Reber did. And after a decade of cooking over the fire the way our foremothers did, Reber knows to take no chances. "Catching fire [while cooking] was the second most prevalent way of dying back then for women," Reber says, as she stomps the floor to extinguish any errant sparks.
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