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By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,New York Times News Service | March 13, 1992
A heart valve that has been implanted through open-heart surgery in more than 20,000 Americans has such a high rate of sudden deadly failure that recipients should talk to their doctors about having them replaced, the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday.The device, the Bjork Shiley Concavo-Convex heart valve, is made by Shiley Inc. of Irvine, Calif., a subsidiary of Pfize Inc.Shiley said in a statment that the data cited by the government were from a single study and that it was surprised that the FDA would publicize them before meeting with the company.
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SPORTS
By Dr. Jeffrey S. Mandak, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Sudden cardiac death is the most common mode of death in this country with more than 300,000 deaths per year, a third of which occur during physical activity. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 children die of sudden death each year. Sudden cardiac death most often occurs as the result of ventricular fibrillation (VF), an abrupt irregular heart rhythm that causes the heart to quiver inneffectively rather than pumping normally. In lacrosse and other sports such as baseball and hockey, however, another unpredictable and relatively uncommon source of cardiac death has been recognized — commotio cordis.
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NEWS
June 3, 1999
Manuel Chavez,73, a United Farm Workers activist, died in San Diego Sunday of pancreatic cancer. He was a farm worker who went on to become a key organizer for the union, which successfully sought to represent tens of thousands of farm workers across the nation during the 1960s and 1970s.He was a cousin and confidant of labor leader Cesar Chavez, who died in 1993.Mary Allen Rowlands,94, artist-actress and mother of actress Gena Rowlands, died Friday in Los Angeles.Ed Peterson,78, inventor of the alarm that beeps to warn people when trucks and heavy machinery are backing up, died May 26 in Boise, Idaho.
NEWS
By Claire Panosian Dunavan | November 18, 2007
The young man in the hospital bed first cajoled, then narrowed his eyes to angry slits. No-way, no-how did he want certain details in his medical record. Finally, he threatened. He was a lawyer, he said, and the situation could get ugly. "You're a lawyer?" I thought in amazement as my eyes moved from his meaty, chiseled shoulder to the IV drip-drip-dripping antibiotics into his forearm. "You're a lawyer - and you use illegal steroids? Then browbeat doctors into deleting the fact from their notes?"
NEWS
By Claire Panosian Dunavan | November 18, 2007
The young man in the hospital bed first cajoled, then narrowed his eyes to angry slits. No-way, no-how did he want certain details in his medical record. Finally, he threatened. He was a lawyer, he said, and the situation could get ugly. "You're a lawyer?" I thought in amazement as my eyes moved from his meaty, chiseled shoulder to the IV drip-drip-dripping antibiotics into his forearm. "You're a lawyer - and you use illegal steroids? Then browbeat doctors into deleting the fact from their notes?"
SPORTS
By Dr. Jeffrey S. Mandak, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Sudden cardiac death is the most common mode of death in this country with more than 300,000 deaths per year, a third of which occur during physical activity. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 children die of sudden death each year. Sudden cardiac death most often occurs as the result of ventricular fibrillation (VF), an abrupt irregular heart rhythm that causes the heart to quiver inneffectively rather than pumping normally. In lacrosse and other sports such as baseball and hockey, however, another unpredictable and relatively uncommon source of cardiac death has been recognized — commotio cordis.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | March 14, 1992
More than 300 patients in Baltimore-area hospitals received a model of an artificial heart valve that the federal Food and Drug Administration says may have a five times higher risk of failure than previously thought.At least 16 people with the device had contacted area hospitals yesterday, one day after the FDA recommended that they talk to their surgeons about having the valves replaced.Dr. Joseph McLaughlin, chief of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said his institution implanted about 300 of the large Bjork-Shiley Concavo-Convex heart valves, manufactured by Pfizer Inc., in the 1970s and early 1980s.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
Two weeks after the Mayo Clinic suggested a possible link between two popular weight-loss drugs and a heart disorder, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has learned of 17 additional cases in states ranging from Maryland to California.The reports came in response to an FDA letter, dated July 8, asking doctors to document any cases of heart valve disease among patients who took diet pills used in a combination known as "fen-phen."The agency has yet to evaluate the reports, and the link between fen-phen and heart disease remains unproved.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2005
Seven years ago, Carol Weihrer, a flutist and office administrator, had her right eye removed. Weihrer had been living in pain from a severely scratched cornea for years and had already undergone 17 surgeries to try to fix it. Just before she was given general anesthesia, she remembers feeling relieved that her trauma would soon be over. Suddenly, she woke up hearing disco music and thinking, "I must be done." The next thing she said she heard was someone saying, " `Cut deeper. Pull harder.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
During a checkup, my doctor said that my examination and tests were normal except for left ventricular hypertrophy on the electrocardiogram. What causes left ventricular hypertrophy. Is it dangerous? Can it be treated?Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an enlargement of the left ventricle, the heart chamber that pumps blood through the aorta to all of the body except the lungs. The enlargement may involve either thickening of the wall of the left ventricle or an increase in the size of the chamber itself.
NEWS
June 3, 1999
Manuel Chavez,73, a United Farm Workers activist, died in San Diego Sunday of pancreatic cancer. He was a farm worker who went on to become a key organizer for the union, which successfully sought to represent tens of thousands of farm workers across the nation during the 1960s and 1970s.He was a cousin and confidant of labor leader Cesar Chavez, who died in 1993.Mary Allen Rowlands,94, artist-actress and mother of actress Gena Rowlands, died Friday in Los Angeles.Ed Peterson,78, inventor of the alarm that beeps to warn people when trucks and heavy machinery are backing up, died May 26 in Boise, Idaho.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
Two weeks after the Mayo Clinic suggested a possible link between two popular weight-loss drugs and a heart disorder, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has learned of 17 additional cases in states ranging from Maryland to California.The reports came in response to an FDA letter, dated July 8, asking doctors to document any cases of heart valve disease among patients who took diet pills used in a combination known as "fen-phen."The agency has yet to evaluate the reports, and the link between fen-phen and heart disease remains unproved.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | March 14, 1992
More than 300 patients in Baltimore-area hospitals received a model of an artificial heart valve that the federal Food and Drug Administration says may have a five times higher risk of failure than previously thought.At least 16 people with the device had contacted area hospitals yesterday, one day after the FDA recommended that they talk to their surgeons about having the valves replaced.Dr. Joseph McLaughlin, chief of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said his institution implanted about 300 of the large Bjork-Shiley Concavo-Convex heart valves, manufactured by Pfizer Inc., in the 1970s and early 1980s.
NEWS
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,New York Times News Service | March 13, 1992
A heart valve that has been implanted through open-heart surgery in more than 20,000 Americans has such a high rate of sudden deadly failure that recipients should talk to their doctors about having them replaced, the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday.The device, the Bjork Shiley Concavo-Convex heart valve, is made by Shiley Inc. of Irvine, Calif., a subsidiary of Pfize Inc.Shiley said in a statment that the data cited by the government were from a single study and that it was surprised that the FDA would publicize them before meeting with the company.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | August 3, 1993
Q: One of my friends told me about sclerotherapy that was used to treat her varicose veins. What is sclerotherapy? Is it an accepted form of treatment?A: Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins resulting from a defect in venous valves that normally aid in the return of blood to the heart. Valve failure leads to a backward flow of blood (away from the heart) with venous pooling of the blood causing the varicose veins.Sclerotherapy involves injecting into the swollen veins a solution that irritates and damages the inner lining of the veins.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 18, 1997
Four people filed a class-action suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday against the makers of three controversial weight-loss drugs they allege put them at risk for heart and lung conditions.Georgiana Donlin of Whiteford, Robert Patro of Elkton, Barry Steeley of Woodstock and Julie Watson of Timonium sued 12 drug companies seeking payment for continued medical monitoring for ailments they allege can be caused by the drugs fenfluramine and phentermine -- together called fen-phen -- and dexfenfluramine, also known as Redux.
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