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Heart Transplant

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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
A fist-sized contraption of plastic and metal kept 63-year-old Grant Feusner alive for five weeks earlier this year, pumping blood from his chest to his brain, kidneys and muscles. Doctors had removed most of Feusner's heart, ballooned with disease and too weak to nourish his organs with oxygen and nutrients. It wasn't the first time Feusner's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center had implanted such a device. Artificial hearts are designed to be used as a bridge from heart failure to heart transplant.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 5, 2013
Amazing how a name can trigger a sudden burst of memories. "Hello, this is Ryan Wineke," a voice on the phone said. The name is pronounced "Win-ek-ee. " As soon as I heard it, I thought of Larry Wineke, the only man I ever knew by that name. I assumed he must have run out of time. "You wrote a story about my dad 18 years ago," the young man on the phone said. Indeed I had. Larry Wineke - Calvert Hall teacher and coach, big man, tough man and teddy bear - had a heart transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital on Thanksgiving morning, Nov. 23, 1995.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | October 11, 1994
Q: Two acquaintances of mine have had a heart transplant while in their 30s. What kind of heart problem can require a transplant at that early age?A: Although it is a relatively uncommon form of heart disease, cardiomyopathy is the most common disorder resulting in a heart transplant in young people. Cardiomyopathy is a term used to describe several types of abnormalities of the muscle (myocardium) of the left ventricle, the heart chamber that pumps blood via the aorta to the rest of the body.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Stefon Diggs' poignant words are echoing in cyberspace. They are like cries in the darkness. "I just wanna hear his voice," Maryland's best football player says in a Twitter message directed to no one and everyone. "Show him everything I've done and how far I've came. " The 19-year-old receiver's posts about his late father come in bursts. Only those close to Diggs - who had one of the most prolific freshman seasons in Terps history in 2012 - know the powerful back story.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Five-year-old Teresa Bartlinski was lying unconscious shortly after 3 a.m. Friday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia when the doctor told her parents they had called off the heart transplant she was prepped to receive. The girl - whose Catonsville family enlisted their church, community and global supporters to join them in praying for a miracle healing - remains a top candidate for a heart donation, but this midnight drive from Maryland had been a disappointment. Dr. Joseph Rossano, medical director for heart transplantation at the Pennsylvania hospital, told Teresa's parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski, that the heart, which came from a child who had died, appeared in an ultrasound to be healthy enough.
NEWS
September 8, 1998
Judith Colwell Lininger, a heart transplant patient whose illness inspired her to help others, died of heart failure Thursday at her Lutherville home. She was 57.A native of Teaneck, N.J., Mrs. Lininger graduated with a degree in art from Otterbein College in Westerville, Ohio, in 1964.In 1962, she married John L. Lininger, whom she had met in college. The couple lived in Havre de Grace and in Bel Air before moving to Lutherville three years ago.Mrs. Lininger was a homemaker and substitute teacher who enjoyed painting portraits of children.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | October 30, 1993
The Tin Man knew there could be a day like this, if he only had a heart.Not a cloud in the sky and the sun flashing off his polished funnel hat and the red plastic heart dangling from his neck roughly marking the spot where the trouble began. The Tin Man's real heart filled with good will as he stood outside Marley Elementary School in Anne Arundel County yesterday afternoon waving and smiling as the youngsters walked by in their Halloween costumes.When the Grim Reaper approached with scythe aloft, the Tin Man smiled and let Death walk by. What else could a heart transplant patient do?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
Donna Lynn Anderson, a former high school and college athlete whose survival of two heart transplant operations allowed her to continue playing sports and was an inspiration to others, died of renal failure Sunday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 53 and lived in Ruxton. Miss Anderson was born and reared on Ruxway Road in Ruxton. She was a 1968 graduate of Towson High School, where she played varsity lacrosse, field hockey and basketball. A physical education major, she attended Catonsville Community College for two years, continuing to play lacrosse, field hockey and basketball.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
Seven Oaks Elementary School performed a play about life in the Clinton White House for a dog named Shoes. Kingsville Elementary School connected a scene from the "Iliad" in which Patroclus is stabbed through the heart to the first heart transplant operation by Dr. Christiaan Barnard in 1967.And, when the world finals of the recent Odyssey of the Mind Tournament were over, both Baltimore County schools had finished in the top 10.Seven students from Seven Oaks in Perry Hall finished sixth among 55 teams in the Furs, Fins and Feathers category.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Trainer Graham Motion can't seem to catch a break at the Kentucky Derby this week, unless it's a bad break. Motion came to Kentucky with a legitimate Derby contender in Toby's Corner, but had to scratch him on Tuesday after the horse injured his left hind leg while training in Maryland. Motion still has another Derby entry in Animal Kingdom, but on Wednesday Animal Kingdom's jockey, Robby Albarado , was thrown from his mount in a maiden claiming race and had to be taken to the hospital by ambulance.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
As they cradled her lifeless body Monday, Ed and Ann Bartlinski tried to picture their 6-year-old daughter on a bicycle pedaling toward heaven, to celebrate her life as a miracle, rather than see her death as a sign of unanswered prayers. Teresa Bartlinski, an effervescent child abandoned after birth in a village on the banks of China's Yellow River, died at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after doctors attempted to implant an artificial heart in her chest. Three years after her adoption by the Catonsville family, Teresa had already outlived everyone's expectations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Doctors determined that Teresa Bartlinski, the 6-year-old Catonsville girl struggling to accept a donor's heart, will be re-listed on the transplant list. The family announced on their blog, ourplacecalledhome.blogspot.com, that Teresa will remain on life support at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia until Monday when she will receive an artificial heart to bridge the time until another donor heart is available. The child, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, waited for nearly a year for the heart transplant she received less than two weeks ago. Teresa was adopted by a devout Roman Catholic family from Catonsville that has enlisted their church, St. Mark, and community to pray for a miracle.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Ann Bartlinski placed the Eucharist and a pearl-beaded rosary blessed by the hands of the late Pope John Paul II on the chest of her 6-year-old daughter, Teresa, who lay Tuesday in a hospital bed, her tiny body rejecting a donor's heart. Teresa remained still, connected to life support at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia while her parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski of Catonsville, their parish priest, the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley of St. Mark Church, and the community prayed for a miracle.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
The devil may have taken Skylar Marion away, his father says, but God had to figure out how to spread him around. Skylar, a 15-year-old Chesapeake High School freshman who loved to tinker with bicycles and spend time outdoors, was killed in a hit-and-run just a quarter-mile from his home in Pasadena in April. The driver of the vehicle that hit him has yet to be found. But in a turn of events that surprised two families in the tight-knit Pasadena community, part of Skylar will continue to live on. His heart, transplanted into the body of an ailing friend, will bind two families together for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Five-year-old Teresa Bartlinski was lying unconscious shortly after 3 a.m. Friday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia when the doctor told her parents they had called off the heart transplant she was prepped to receive. The girl - whose Catonsville family enlisted their church, community and global supporters to join them in praying for a miracle healing - remains a top candidate for a heart donation, but this midnight drive from Maryland had been a disappointment. Dr. Joseph Rossano, medical director for heart transplantation at the Pennsylvania hospital, told Teresa's parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski, that the heart, which came from a child who had died, appeared in an ultrasound to be healthy enough.
HEALTH
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Nobody believed Liu Fang, born with half a heart and abandoned in a village west of Beijing, would survive long after being adopted by a Baltimore County family. Even the Bartlinskis, deeply religious Catholics, expected the girl's lungs would fail even if her heart could be repaired. Two years later, as the 5-year-old girl awaits a cardiac transplant, her parents, a Catonsville school and the family's parish are literally praying for a miracle. She is awaiting the procedure at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 5, 2013
Amazing how a name can trigger a sudden burst of memories. "Hello, this is Ryan Wineke," a voice on the phone said. The name is pronounced "Win-ek-ee. " As soon as I heard it, I thought of Larry Wineke, the only man I ever knew by that name. I assumed he must have run out of time. "You wrote a story about my dad 18 years ago," the young man on the phone said. Indeed I had. Larry Wineke - Calvert Hall teacher and coach, big man, tough man and teddy bear - had a heart transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital on Thanksgiving morning, Nov. 23, 1995.
HEALTH
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Nobody believed Liu Fang, born with half a heart and abandoned in a village west of Beijing, would survive long after being adopted by a Baltimore County family. Even the Bartlinskis, deeply religious Catholics, expected the girl's lungs would fail even if her heart could be repaired. Two years later, as the 5-year-old girl awaits a cardiac transplant, her parents, a Catonsville school and the family's parish are literally praying for a miracle. She is awaiting the procedure at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
A fist-sized contraption of plastic and metal kept 63-year-old Grant Feusner alive for five weeks earlier this year, pumping blood from his chest to his brain, kidneys and muscles. Doctors had removed most of Feusner's heart, ballooned with disease and too weak to nourish his organs with oxygen and nutrients. It wasn't the first time Feusner's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center had implanted such a device. Artificial hearts are designed to be used as a bridge from heart failure to heart transplant.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 2, 2012
Facebook has started an effort to get more people interested in organ donation -- and so far about 10,600 people "like" this. Read The Sun's story in today's paper here . But the effort seems to at least partially stem from a conversation a hopkins doctor had with an old classmate from Harvard who happens to now be an executive at the social media site. It may be Facebook's first foray into social issue on such a scale. The comments also are pouring in from those who have donated a loved one's organs or their own (living donors also are needed)
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