Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHeart Surgery
IN THE NEWS

Heart Surgery

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 18, 2011
I read with interest your article "From 'blue babies' to healthy adults" (Feb. 13). In December, 1960, our first child, was born with a congenital heart defect, transposition of the great vessels. He was taken by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital for evaluation and possible surgery. Dr. Helen Taussig, a pediatric cardiologist, invited us to her home on a cold, snowy winter's day, explained the heart defect and recommended surgery immediately. One week after my son's birth, Dr. Henry Bahnson operated successfully, and a month later Brad came home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Just before Wednesday's workout began at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex, Orioles manager Buck Showalter called for 10-year-old Johnny Oates II and his younger brother Jackson to hop the fence and join the team on the field. The siblings quickly sprinted to Showalter, who introduced them to the players circling around, most of them starters. That's when Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts spoke up. “Let's show them what we have in common,” Roberts said with a smile before both he and Johnny lifted their shirts to reveal large vertical scars along the middle of their chests.
Advertisement
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | April 20, 1995
The speaker of the House of Delegates, Casper R. Taylor Jr., underwent quadruple bypass surgery yesterday morning at a Washington hospital. The 60-year-old political leader from Western Maryland was listed in critical but stable condition yesterday afternoon at the Washington Hospital Center."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Surgery on older people can be riskier than other generations. But it can be safely done if doctors take certain precautions. Dr. Mark Katlic, chief of surgery at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and an expert on surgical care of patients 80 and older, talks about the risks involved. Is a patient ever too old for surgery? There is no age in years that makes a patient ineligible for needed surgery. Early in the last century, many surgeons held the view that age 50 was old! Now we are doing complex operations, even heart surgery, in patients in their 80s, 90s and into their 100s.
HEALTH
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
This is for all those people who are seriously ill and thinking they may never do what they love again. I was like that in 2010, recovering from back-to-back breast cancer and heart surgeries and the aftermath. I thought tennis, which is my athletic passion, was probably not going to be part of my future - if there was one. During my illnesses, tennis was a number of things to me: distraction, as my recovery efforts happened to be perfectly timed for watching the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open; incentive, because I couldn't wait to get back onto the court; and dream - would I ever make it back?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
In an era of skyrocketing drug costs, researchers have shown that a $2 infusion with one of the earth's most common elements greatly reduces the complications of open heart surgery.When given in the closing minutes of heart surgery, magnesium cut in half the frequency of abnormal heart rhythms, lessened the need for drugs to combat arythmias and shortened the time patients spent on respirators.Dr. Bart Chernow, the chief physician at Baltimore's Sinai Hospital, said yesterday he was so delighted with the findings that he believes one-time magnesium infusions should be given to all patients undergoing heart bypass and valve replacement surgery.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | March 15, 1993
Manchester Councilman Robert C. Kolodziejski returned home Wednesday after heart surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore."I really don't know how long I'll be out," he said."
NEWS
September 3, 1992
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins was moved from intensive care last night at Washington Hospital Center and his condition was upgraded from serious to fair as he continued to recover from triple bypass heart surgery.The mayor underwent the nearly six-hour operation Monday afternoon after a fainting spell last week led doctors to discover he had a blocked coronary artery. He was in intensive care for less than 24 hours before being moved to the hospital's cardiac care unit, a hospital spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
Relatives of patients joined the usual lobbyists, hospital executives and medical experts yesterday in debating whether the state needs more open-heart surgery programs. Tamiko Campbell of Catonsville said her husband died after being transferred for heart treatment. "If we had open-heart surgery at St. Agnes, I know he'd be here with me today," she said. She testified at a hearing on a bill that would make it easier for hospitals to start open-heart programs, repeating the sentiments she stated as one of several speakers at a pre-hearing rally in Annapolis attended by about 150 people - most arriving on buses arranged by St. Agnes HealthCare - supporting the legislation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin was taken to the Central Clinical Hospital yesterday morning suffering from what his press secretary described as the flu accompanied by a high fever.Dmitri Yakushkin, the Kremlin press secretary, said Yeltsin, 68, had not felt well Friday but refused to go into the hospital until yesterday. Yakushkin said the president would stay in the hospital for at least two days.Yeltsin, now less than a year away from finishing his second four-year term in office, has been in poor health for years.
HEALTH
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
This is for all those people who are seriously ill and thinking they may never do what they love again. I was like that in 2010, recovering from back-to-back breast cancer and heart surgeries and the aftermath. I thought tennis, which is my athletic passion, was probably not going to be part of my future - if there was one. During my illnesses, tennis was a number of things to me: distraction, as my recovery efforts happened to be perfectly timed for watching the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open; incentive, because I couldn't wait to get back onto the court; and dream - would I ever make it back?
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
A.J. Foyt, Indy car racing's all-time winningest driver (67) and championship record holder (7), is now 77. He's had open heart surgery, and in January went through an illness that nearly killed him. But here he is, alive, opinonated and planning to get his race team back among the top teams in the IndyCar Series. In a recent one-on-one interview Foyt talked about many things, among them why the 1977 Indy 500 win was special to him beyond making him the first driver to win the race four times, the recent announcement that he'll field a car for minority driver Chase Austin in the Indianapolis 500 next May and a recent staph infection following same-day surgeries to remove bone spurs from his artificial knee and repair a rotator cuff.
NEWS
February 18, 2011
I read with interest your article "From 'blue babies' to healthy adults" (Feb. 13). In December, 1960, our first child, was born with a congenital heart defect, transposition of the great vessels. He was taken by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital for evaluation and possible surgery. Dr. Helen Taussig, a pediatric cardiologist, invited us to her home on a cold, snowy winter's day, explained the heart defect and recommended surgery immediately. One week after my son's birth, Dr. Henry Bahnson operated successfully, and a month later Brad came home.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Henry Strohminger, a retired automobile dealership owner who was a founder of a support group for heart transplant patients, died of kidney failure Friday at his Surfside Beach, S.C., home. The former Glen Arm and Severna Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Hudson Street in Highlandtown, he attended Sacred Heart of Jesus School and was a 1952 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He remained active in the school's alumni association and was its president for two terms and chaired its bull and oyster roasts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Victor John Batts, a retired steelworker who successfully survived a heart pump implantation and later became a much-in-demand spokesman for the device and procedure, died Saturday of heart failure at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Randallstown resident was 57. Mr. Batts was diagnosed in 1998 with congestive heart failure, and eventually the medications he had been taking for the condition and a defibrillator failed to relieve the condition. By 2004, when he was first admitted to a local hospital, his heart was operating at less than 10 percent "I was feeling terrible.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | March 24, 2009
Williams recovering from heart surgery Robin Williams is recovering at a hospital in Cleveland after having heart surgery his doctors deemed successful. The 57-year-old actor had an operation to replace an aortic valve at the Cleveland Clinic on March 13. Publicists Mara Buxbaum and Chris Kanarick say he is expected to make a complete recovery in the next eight weeks. Wedding bells Bruce Willis has tied the knot for the second time. The actor's publicity agency, Rogers & Cowan, said in a statement Sunday that the 54-year-old Willis married 30-year-old model-actress Emma Heming in a small, private ceremony at his home in Parrot Cay in the Turks & Caicos Islands.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2001
They rolled their eyes when Carroll interim schools Superintendent Charles I. Ecker predicted he would be back to work after heart surgery in two to three weeks. His doctors expected he would need four to six weeks to recover. But hitting his forecast by a day, Ecker returned to the office - nearly unannounced - Wednesday, less than three weeks after he underwent surgery to clear a blockage in one of his coronary arteries. He's been putting in four or five hours at the office each day and is planning to attend today's Board of Education meeting.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1999
Some of the State House's most prominent lobbyists are locked in an intense battle over the right to carve up one of medicine's most valuable assets -- the human heart.In a showdown between "haves" and "have nots," a handful of hospitals are urging state lawmakers to give them permission to perform open-heart surgery, a lucrative procedure allowed at only eight of Maryland's 50 hospitals.A dozen Maryland hospitals are battling each other -- with such upstarts as St. Agnes Hospital in Catonsville squaring off against heavyweights that already are allowed to do heart surgery, such as the University of Maryland Medical Center and the Washington Hospital Center.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | October 30, 2008
After his New Jersey Nets opened the season by beating the Washington Wizards, 95-85, behind Vince Carter's 21 points, coach Lawrence Frank praised all of his players and talked about how guys who didn't even get in helped by being "supportive." Sure, Coach. Eventually, Frank got around to acknowledging last night what everyone knows about these new-look Nets, saying, "Vince was the hub for us." Carter - whose teammates elected him the Nets' captain, Frank announced before the game - scored 15 in the second half.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
STEPHEN B. COLVIN, 64 Noted heart surgeon Dr. Stephen B. Colvin, a heart surgeon who promoted the now-widespread use of a pioneering procedure for repairing a leaky heart valve and who also performed heart surgery on children all over the world, died March 8 in Manhattan. He suffered from multiple myeloma, his brother said. The procedure promoted by Dr. Colvin, reconstruction rather than replacement of the mitral valve, was first performed in France in the 1980s by Dr. Alain F. Carpentier.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.