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Heart Rate

FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 26, 1994
A lot of people use pulse rate monitors when they exercise, but you don't need one. The only exercise pulse rate that you need to know is your training pulse rate, a mythical number that will strengthen your heart without causing pain. You don't have to know the number of beats per minute because you reach your training pulse rate when you just start to require more oxygen. You will just start to breathe more frequently and more deeply, causing you to raise your shoulders as you take deeper breaths.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
Q: I have been jogging regularly for several years; but a friend my age just had a heart attack while running, and I now wonder whether it is safe for me to continue my jogging routine.A: Two reports in the December issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, one from this country and one from Germany, shed considerable light on your question.The authors found some bad news: The risk of a heart attack during or in the hour after strenuous exertion, such as jogging or shoveling snow, was two times greater in the German study and six times greater in the American study than during periods of rest or less strenuous activity.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
A study of premature babies has found that a declining heart rate is responsible for at least some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, challenging the widespread belief that SIDS occurs when an infant unaccountably stops breathing.Dr. Robert G. Meny, a pediatrician at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said the finding should push research in a new direction -- prompting doctors to explore why the heart rate slows and what might be done to prevent it."With these recorded deaths we find there was a heart rate problem before the babies stopped breathing," said Dr. Meany, director of clinical services at the university's SIDS Institute.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
When the space mechanics repairing the Hubble Space Telescope go to work, the flight surgeon at Mission Control knows how fast their hearts are beating.He knows if they sweat, breathe heavily or laugh.What he doesn't necessarily know is whether they are tired. And the mechanics don't volunteer much about that."Fatigue has to be self-reported," said Dr. Richard T. Jennings, a NASA flight surgeon who has monitored three shuttle flights. "We'll let these guys tell us if this is too much or not."
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer | March 3, 1992
When Sam teaches the students in his aerobics class, he works to get them in good-enough shape to exercise at their target heart rate -- intense enough to make them fit yet easy enough to help protect them from injury.To become fit, you need to increase your heart rate by more than 20 beats a minute above its rate at rest.Obviously, exercising at an intensity greater than that will cause an even greater improvement in heart function, but it could also increase your chance of injury. To be safe, your target heart rate should be 60 percent of your maximum heart rate.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | July 9, 1991
ANYONE WHO has known the pleasures of a treadmill test -- electrodes on the chest, tubes in mouth, the machine's belt growing faster and steeper -- has seen the Borg scale. Scrawled on a piece of cardboard, perhaps, and held up by a bored lab assistant, it's your lifeline, the only way to tell the people in the white coats how you feel.Granted, they're counting your heartbeats and collecting your exhalations and maybe even sticking you for blood, so in some important respects they know exactly what you're going through.
FEATURES
July 9, 1991
A run, swim or bike ride that merely feels strenuous may not always boost your heart rate into the "aerobic zone." Aerobic exercise lowers blood pressure, improves cholesterol profiles, burns body fat and reduces the risk of heart attack. It's worthwhile, in other words, to find out just how hard your heart is really working.No set of sensations -- breathing hard or breaking into a sweat -- signifies a suitably beneficial workout for everybody in every setting. But with practice you can learn to connect your perceived exertion to your heart rate.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush bounded into the White House yesterday morning grinning broadly and flashing two fingers at reporters.Adding a little pumping motion with his arms, Mr. Bush made clear that his hand signal didn't mean victory or peace but a successful return to the jogging trail during which he completed his normal distance of two miles for the first time since developing heart and thyroid problems early last month."
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