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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 26, 1994
A lot of people use pulse rate monitors when they exercise, but you don't need one. The only exercise pulse rate that you need to know is your training pulse rate, a mythical number that will strengthen your heart without causing pain. You don't have to know the number of beats per minute because you reach your training pulse rate when you just start to require more oxygen. You will just start to breathe more frequently and more deeply, causing you to raise your shoulders as you take deeper breaths.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Frostburg State's offense has been paced by the attack of junior Ryan Serio (Chesapeake-AA), sophomore Devin Colegrove (Dulaney) and freshman Spenser Love (Winters Mill), which has combined for 67 of the team's 150 goals and 44 of the 97 assists. And sophomore midfielder Chris Rios (14 goals and 18 assists) has also been instrumental. The unit has also been buoyed by the return of junior midfielders Devon Stailey and Lucas Flaig. Stailey has registered 10 goals and three assists while missing the first four games of the season due to a serious blood infection.
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SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles pitcher David Wells underwent tests yesterday to determine the cause of a rapid heart rate that started increasing Sunday night, and one of the first tests revealed no abnormalities.Wells, 32, checked into Holy Cross Hospital here and was expected to remain under care overnight, as the tests continued and his rapid heart rate was treated. One of the first tests, an EKG, revealed no abnormalities, according to Orioles team doctor William Goldiner.A rapid heart rate, Goldiner said, "may or may not be serious.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | February 12, 2013
Baltimore-based Under Armour hosted a press event in New York City Tuesday to introduce what the company has dubbed "its biggest ever global marketing campaign. " While the new "I Will" campaign recalls the old "Will you protect this house?" commercial that first helped the company become popular -- the respondents always answered "I will!" -- the new spot released Tuesday focuses on an area that has become increasingly important: high-end technology and innovation. Let's just say that the commercial ends with a woman adjusting the composition and color of her clothing by using a touch screen built into her sleeve.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
A study of premature babies has found that a declining heart rate is responsible for at least some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, challenging the widespread belief that SIDS occurs when an infant unaccountably stops breathing.Dr. Robert G. Meny, a pediatrician at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said the finding should push research in a new direction -- prompting doctors to explore why the heart rate slows and what might be done to prevent it."With these recorded deaths we find there was a heart rate problem before the babies stopped breathing," said Dr. Meany, director of clinical services at the university's SIDS Institute.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
In 1960 Gordon Spitzmesser, an Indiana tool-and-die maker with an apparently restless mind, invented the gas-powered pogo stick. The "Pop Along" worked fine. Too fine. The government felt the super toy was a safety hazard and quickly pulled it off the market (whereupon Spitzmesser refocused his attention on trying, unsuccessfully, to create a car that could run on water). "There's just a fascination with bouncing that humans have," observes Jeff Bergerson, a 29-year-old Washington state personal trainer and extreme skier who has fallen in love with a newer and potentially safer version of the high-performance pogo stick.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | February 12, 2013
Baltimore-based Under Armour hosted a press event in New York City Tuesday to introduce what the company has dubbed "its biggest ever global marketing campaign. " While the new "I Will" campaign recalls the old "Will you protect this house?" commercial that first helped the company become popular -- the respondents always answered "I will!" -- the new spot released Tuesday focuses on an area that has become increasingly important: high-end technology and innovation. Let's just say that the commercial ends with a woman adjusting the composition and color of her clothing by using a touch screen built into her sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
By April Lynch and April Lynch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 23, 2004
Flying down the road, cyclist and triathlon coach Eric Bean leans over his bike frame. He glances at his left wrist, gauging how hard he should pedal and how long he can last. Other athletes, breathing and sweating hard, might listen to their pounding pulses and screaming muscles instead. Bean relies on a portable heart rate monitor, trusting the two-piece digital system to keep him rolling strongly and safely. The watchlike display on his wrist tells him how fast his heart is beating, picking up a radio signal coming from a sensor on his chest.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and By Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | August 12, 2005
The fascination with heart-rate monitors reached new heights after the Outdoor Life Network showed the pulse of some riders in the Tour de France in July. It's like having a cockpit view of an auto racer's instrument panel. Perennial champ Lance Armstrong didn't volunteer his real-time data; he didn't want competitors to know when he was truly sweating. But his heart-rate numbers, which provide a rare glimpse into his freakishly efficient body, are legendary and telling. When Armstrong is relaxing off the bike, his resting heart rate, or pulse, has been measured at just 32 beats per minute, less than half that of the average man. When he's sprinting up a steep mountain, it might spike to around 200 beats per minute.
FEATURES
July 9, 1991
A run, swim or bike ride that merely feels strenuous may not always boost your heart rate into the "aerobic zone." Aerobic exercise lowers blood pressure, improves cholesterol profiles, burns body fat and reduces the risk of heart attack. It's worthwhile, in other words, to find out just how hard your heart is really working.No set of sensations -- breathing hard or breaking into a sweat -- signifies a suitably beneficial workout for everybody in every setting. But with practice you can learn to connect your perceived exertion to your heart rate.
FEATURES
January 11, 2013
When my Chihuahua had her teeth cleaned last week, the vet said her heart rate went down into the high 60s and that an episode of second-degree heart block occurred, but they reversed it with meds. Does this mean she is at risk of it happening again under anesthesia? Other than perhaps a follow-up EKG at her next comprehensive exam, should anything else be done? I am scared to have her teeth cleaned again. First, I would schedule a consult with this pet's veterinarian and review the risks and the benefits of the procedure.
HEALTH
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
This is for all those people who are seriously ill and thinking they may never do what they love again. I was like that in 2010, recovering from back-to-back breast cancer and heart surgeries and the aftermath. I thought tennis, which is my athletic passion, was probably not going to be part of my future - if there was one. During my illnesses, tennis was a number of things to me: distraction, as my recovery efforts happened to be perfectly timed for watching the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open; incentive, because I couldn't wait to get back onto the court; and dream - would I ever make it back?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 7, 2012
Johns Hopkins University Engineering students unveiled devices Monday that they hope will lower the number of still births and deaths from fever-related illnesses in developing countries. FeverPoint is a screening test that uses a cotton thread and a drop of blood to check for causes of fevers related to malaria, bacterial pneumonia and other infections. The device works similar to a pregnancy test in that it does not require water or electricity, which are not readily available in some countries.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | March 16, 2012
Five days after suffering what his doctor called a mild heart attack Sunday, Salisbury coach Jim Berkman has only the tender area on his leg where a catheter was inserted as physical evidence of that procedure. “I feel all right,” Berkman, 52, said Friday morning from his home. “Actually, I'm a little antsy here. I'm not a guy who can sit around a whole lot. So I'm kind of getting stir-crazy right now.” The NCAA's all-time winningest coach with 395 victories, Berkman has not been allowed to return to the top-ranked Sea Gulls, who have captured nine national championships, including last year's title, under Berkman.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 18, 2012
A half hour is all you need to maintain proper weight, get your blood flowing and improve health, according to the Society for Vascular Surgery, which forwarded us a list of calories burned by various winter sports from Livestrong.com. In one hour, a 155-160 pound person can burn: +511 calories cross country skiing +365 calories downhill skiing +563 calories playing ice hockey +511 calories ice skating +400 calories shoveling snow by hand There hasn't been any snow here so far this winter, so how about burning : +281 calories bicycling +329 calories carrying golf clubs +211 calories walking the dog “Welcome 2012 as your year to become physically fit and keep your vascular system healthy,” said Dr. Anil Hingorani, a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
The new year brings a lot of resolutions to exercise. And sometimes the cold weather also means more snow shoveling. All that exertion can be harmful to people with abnormal hearts by leading to sudden cardiac arrest. Dr. Gordon Tomaselli, director of cardiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, talks about the difference between sudden cardiac arrest and a heart attack and what those at risk can do. Question: What is sudden cardiac arrest? Answer: Sudden cardiac arrest refers to collapse and loss of consciousness due to a dramatic fall in blood pressure.
NEWS
By King Features Syndicate | June 18, 2000
Q. I am a 43-year-old man being treated to prevent glaucoma. My father and grandfather both had it, and my eye pressure is increased. I stopped responding to Betagan and am now on Timoptic-XE. Do these drugs affect the heart? It is harder to hit my target heart rate when exercising, and I also tire more easily since I've been on the drops. A. Betagan and Timoptic are both beta blockers. These eye drops lower the pressure within your eye, but they can be absorbed into the body and also lower blood pressure and heart rate.
FEATURES
January 11, 2013
When my Chihuahua had her teeth cleaned last week, the vet said her heart rate went down into the high 60s and that an episode of second-degree heart block occurred, but they reversed it with meds. Does this mean she is at risk of it happening again under anesthesia? Other than perhaps a follow-up EKG at her next comprehensive exam, should anything else be done? I am scared to have her teeth cleaned again. First, I would schedule a consult with this pet's veterinarian and review the risks and the benefits of the procedure.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
Young African-Americans are 20 times as likely as whites to develop heart failure, according to a new study published today. The deadly illness strikes one in every 100 blacks under the age of 50. "We usually thought of heart failure as a disease of older people, but that's based on studies by mostly white participants," said Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, an assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco and the study's lead author....
NEWS
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,kevin.eck@baltsun.com | September 22, 2008
After battling obesity and other health issues for years, Arthur Boorman finally bottomed out. Literally. Boorman, a Brooklyn resident and special education teacher at Severna Park High School, was working with a student at the youngster's home about two years ago, when the chair that he was sitting on collapsed under his 5-foot-6, 340-pound frame. Unable to walk without the use of canes because of problems with his legs and back, the Gulf War veteran and former Army paratrooper realized after the humiliating experience that he needed to reverse his downward spiral.
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