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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | August 9, 1994
Q: I had a mild heart attack six months ago and was doing fine until the past few weeks, when I noted some shortness of breath when walking a few blocks. My doctor said that my problem is heart failure, and he started me on digitalis pills.Are there any other ways to treat heart failure?A: Clinical Practice Guidelines, developed for the management of patients with heart failure by a multidisciplinary panel sponsored by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, was published in June.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Samuel E. Jackson Jr., a retired research psychologist who was a longtime active member of Kappa Alpha Psi, an historically black fraternity, died Sept. 1 at Howard County General Hospital of heart failure. He was 80. "He was a beacon of light in the community and an elder for young men," said Herb Jenkins, general manager of public sector operations for Xerox Corp. and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, who said he benefited from Mr. Jackson's generosity of spirit and sense of caring.
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NEWS
December 17, 2004
A device that automatically detects early symptoms of congestive heart failure has been implanted in a patient in the United States for the first time. The device is designed to allow patients to get treatment earlier and stay healthier. When fluid levels around the heart get too high, they can interfere with a normal heartbeat and cause death. The device implanted Monday in 70-year-old Antonio Comandari of Miami monitors the amount of fluid in the chest. If there is a buildup, doctors can prescribe medication to reduce it. The $30,000 InSync Sentry device, built by Medtronic Inc., is about the size of a cigarette lighter and transmits radio signals that can yield a computer readout on the heart for up to seven years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
On Friday, Belvedere Square will help pay tribute to the late Nelson Carey, the owner of Grand Cru, a European-style wine bar that has been one of the longtime anchors of the North Baltimore marketplace. From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., during Belvedere Square's weekly free   Summer Sounds   concert, merchants such as Atwater's, Ceriello Fine Foods and newcomer Tooloulou will be serving a different version of Carey's favorite food -- the hot dog.  Guests will be asked to make a $5 donation for each hot dog, and the money raised will be used to help finance the college education of Carey's daughter, Paige.
NEWS
By Asahi News Service | April 26, 1992
CHIRAN, Japan -- A Japanese woman who was known as a "mother" of kamikaze pilots during the closing days of World War II died of heart failure at a hospital here. She was 89.Tome Torihama, whose eating house was designated as a military canteen in 1942, waited upon the pilots stationed at the nearby Imperial Army's flying school in Chiran in the southern part of the country."I had to take good care of the pilots who would give their lives for the country," Ms. Torihama said to an Asahi Shimbun reporter in an 1988 interview.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | July 15, 1993
The lives of many people suffering from congestive heart failure could be prolonged by an experimental drug, researchers announced yesterday.The risk of death decreased 62 percent among patients who took the drug for six months, said Dr. Arthur Feldman, associate professor of cardiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a director of the study, published in this week's New England Journal of Medicine."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
A University of Maryland College Park student found dead in his fraternity house Saturday died of heart failure brought about by an irregular heartbeat, according to the Maryland medical examiner.Donald Gene Castleberry of Millersville, who turned 21 four days before he died, suffered from Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, a type of cardiac arrhythmia where the heart sporadically beats faster, sometimes doubling its rate to dangerous levels. He was TTC found in bed in his Delta Tau Delta room at 4 p.m. Saturday and had been dead for 12 hours, college police said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2005
The Food and Drug Administration yesterday approved BiDil, a drug specifically intended for use by African-Americans with congestive heart failure. The agency called the approval a step toward "the promise of personalized medicine." Studies showed that blacks benefited from the drug while the overall population did not. "The good news is they couldn't vote against [BiDil] because it's effective. ... The drug seems to work," said Lawrence C. Brody, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 14, 1992
JERUSALEM -- A police investigation into the death of a Palestinian prisoner in a West Bank jail has cleared interrogators from the Israeli security service Shin Bet of criminal wrongdoing, the authorities said yesterday.Police Minister Ronni Milo said the investigation showed that the "Shin Bet acted as it should, and there were no grounds for the complaints and accusations against it."The inquiry was ordered after the death last week of Mustafa Akawi, 35, who had been arrested Jan. 22 for alleged activities on behalf of the hard-line Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
NEWS
September 14, 2009
Congestive heart failure refers to a large number of conditions that affect the structure or function of the heart, making it more difficult for the heart to supply sufficient blood flow to meet the body's needs. Dr. Michael E. Silverman of Cardiovascular Specialists of Central Maryland and chief of medicine at Howard County General Hospital writes about the causes of and treatments for the problem. * Congestive heart failure occurs when one or more of the heart's chambers loses the ability to maintain proper blood flow.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Elliott A. Brager, an attorney who was an accomplished fundraiser for HIV treatment and research, died of heart failure Monday at his Mount Washington home. He was 72. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Park Heights area, he was the son of Philip Brager, a wholesale shoe inventory control specialist, and the former Hilda Levitz, an executive secretary who also worked in the shoe business. He attended Robert E. Lee School No. 49 and was a 1959 City College graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Maryland, College Park and was a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Law. As a young lawyer, he worked for attorney Abraham L. Adler in his office in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Michael H. Weinman, a retired real estate developer who was a co-manager of the family-owned Morris Weinman Co., died Sunday of heart failure at his Worthington Valley home. He was 78. Michael Henry Weinman was born and raised in Baltimore and was a 1953 graduate of St. Paul's School. In 1957, he earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He served in the Army for a year at Fort Knox, Ky., before going to work in 1958 for Sunny's Surplus, which was a family-owned retail business.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Walter G. Amprey was driving his wife, Andrea, home from a restaurant one night last December when he turned onto an on-ramp for the Baltimore Beltway. A sudden dizziness overcame him. He blacked out. The family SUV ran off the road and rolled into a tree. The pair survived, but Amprey had suffered severe heart failure. It would take a team of surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center - and a new operating-room technique - to give him his best chance for a full and rapid recovery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Henry A. Minch, who had been assistant chief engineer for the Maryland Public Service Commission and a World War II veteran, died Nov. 15 of heart failure at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville. He was 92. The son of Frank Minch, a city firefighter, and Marie Minch, a homemaker, Henry August Minch was born and raised in East Baltimore. A Polytechnic Institute graduate, Mr. Minch enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1942 where he served as a motor machinist mate second class until being discharged in 1946.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2013
William C. Stanley, a cardiovascular physiologist who made connections around the world for his research and loved outdoor exercise, died Oct. 21 in Australia of a heart attack. He was 56. Dr. Stanley lived in Baltimore for about six years — working for the University of Maryland School of Medicine — before moving overseas in January to become chair of cardiovascular physiology at the University of Sydney. A California native, he grew up outdoors, often camping and kayaking with his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Gordon M. Holland, a retired businessman and philanthropist, died Thursday of heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 93. Gordon Monroe Holland, whose father was president of the Holland Tack Co. and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and lived for 71 years in the Catonsville home his parents built near the corner of Edmondson Avenue and North Rolling Road. After graduating from Boys' Latin School in 1939, Mr. Holland earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1942 from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2003
A new type of cardiac pacemaker greatly reduces deaths and hospitalizations caused by heart failure, a new study has found. Pulling together four short-term studies, doctors at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that the pacemakers can cut the death rate in half and reduce hospitalizations by nearly a third. Previous studies showed that the pacemakers improve patients' strength and endurance, and thus their overall quality of life. "By analyzing the studies done to date, we found that the therapy also reduces mortality from heart failure," said David J. Bradley, principal investigator of the study, which appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - A drug specifically intended for use by African-Americans with congestive heart failure received a major boost yesterday when an advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended unanimously that the agency approve it. If the FDA accepts the committee's advice, as it usually does, BiDil would become the first drug approved in the United States for use by a particular racial or ethnic group. FDA action on the application could come next week. Black medical experts in the audience cheered the committee's vote yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
UPDATE (Feb. 23, 4:42 p.m.): Terrel Dishon Taylor, aka Smash, was discovered dead due to congestive heart failure in his Baltimore home 5:30 p.m. Friday, according to a family press release. Funeral arrangements are not yet set, but there will be a vigil on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at City of Gods (1118 Hollins St.) from 6-10 p.m. Donations to the family can be mailed to 8420 Governance Bradford Lane, Ellicott City, Md. 21043. ------------- Baltimore rapper Smash, born Terrel Taylor and also known as T-Mac, died Friday due to heart failure, according to his aunt, Arlette Thomas-Fletcher and long-time manager Swen Brock.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Owen Daly II, who served in the Navy during two wars and was a top executive at two Baltimore-based banks, died Thursday of heart failure at his Lutherville home. He was 87. Mr. Daly was born in Denver, Colo., and attended the Gilman School in Baltimore, where he graduated in 1943. His father had graduated from Gilman. After graduation, Mr. Daly attended a Navy program at the University of Pennsylvania, after which he served as an assistant gunnery officer in the Pacific theater for three years during World War II. He would later serve in the Korean War for two years and left the Navy as a lieutenant.
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