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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 26, 2012
Early menopause may mean a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins Medicine . The researchers say the risk can be twice as high, and doctors should help women avoid early menopause if possible. “If physicians know a patient has entered menopause before her 46th birthday, they can be extra vigilant in making recommendations and providing treatments to help prevent heart attacks and stroke,” Dhananjay Vaidya, an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine in Hopkins'  School of Medicine and leader of the study, said in a statement.
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Dr. Peter O. Kwiterovich Jr., an internationally known expert on lipid disorders who was the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Lipid Clinic and was an early advocate for routine cholesterol screening in children, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 74. "We have lost a true giant in the field of cardiovascular disease. He was one of the quiet pioneers at Hopkins," said Dr. George J. Dover, pediatrician-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital and director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, but many don't recognize the warning signs. They may ignore the symptoms or mistake them for more benign ailments. Dr. Shannon J. Winakur, medical director of the Women's Heart Center at Saint Agnes Hospital, said women should be more aware of heart disease and how to prevent it. How are the warning signs of heart disease different in women? Warning signs of heart disease typically occur with exertion and go away with rest. The classic symptom of heart disease is a dull tightness in the center of the chest, which may or may not radiate to the neck, jaw, left shoulder or left arm. Women can certainly have these symptoms, but they also often describe sharp or burning chest pain.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 27, 2012
Baltimore city is looking for someone to develop a mobile app that helps people reduce their risk of heart disease. The city is one of four chosen by the  theU.S. Department of Health and Human Servicesto take part in a contest dubbed The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge that includes creation of the app. The app should help consumers take a heart health risk assessment and find places to get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked. It will then provide a way for patients to use the results to work with a doctor to develop a plan to improve their heart health.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 21, 2013
Saint Agnes Hospital will work with local churches to screen for heart disease, using a $244,455 grant from The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation. The hospital announced Thursday that it had received the award. The screening program will focus on African-American women, who have the highest risk for developing heart disease, the hospital said. Those found to have heart disease or risk for it will get access to educational programs, lifestyle coaches and exercise classes. The hospital will follow patients over time and measure improvements in health.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
A team of 30 volunteers from Johns Hopkins plans to partner with Baltimore City schools to offer city teens screening for early signs of heart disease. The free exams will look for key risk factors including obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes and family history of disease. With the findings, officials hope to curb increasingly common bad eating and exercising habits before they become engrained. Hopkins officials already had been screening Maryland athletes for heart abnormalities and decided to expand the program to some 2,000 13-year-olds expected to attend a high school fair at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute Nov. 13 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. "One of the surprise findings from our other heart screenings was that basic risk factors for cardiovascular disease are too common among Maryland high-school students, and these students and their parents are simply unaware that they face a serious health problem," said Dr. Theodore Abraham, a cardiologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital who is spearheading the screening efforts.
FEATURES
By Medical Tribune News Service | August 4, 1992
Heart-disease deaths in the United States dropped 24 percent from 1980 to 1988, a sign that Americans are eating better, smoking less and receiving better treatment after heart attacks.Deaths from heart disease in people age 35 and over dropped from 588 per 100,000 people in 1980 to 448 per 100,000 people in 1988, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.The death rate declined faster for men than for women, and faster for whites than for African-Americans, the CDC said."It's clear that we're preventing the occurrence of heart attacks and lowering mortality," said Dr. Charles Hennekens, a professor of preventive medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
Of course, teachers' salaries should depend on how well their students progress over the year ( "A new battle in Md. schools," June 29)! How could anyone object to such a common sense concept? It's exactly the same situation that my doctors are in. I should have lost weight years ago and exercised more. Did I? No. Did I end up with heart disease? Yes. Well, heart disease is in my family's genes, but still, my behaviors should have been different and my doctor should be held accountable - financially.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The U. S. Preventive Services Task Force, made up of 16 medical experts appointed by the federal government's Department of Health and Human Services, has recently recommended that former and current smokers, ages 55 to 80, receive annual CT scans to test for lung cancer. If the recommendation is put into effect, insurers, as a result of Obamacare, would be required to cover the procedure for around 10 million Americans who would qualify. To be sure, the requirement, as compared with chest rays and illustrated by a study by the National Cancer Institute, could result in a 20 percent decrease in deaths from smoking.
NEWS
By Panagis Galiatsatos | May 9, 2014
The elderly man in the back row stood up. I was five minutes into a 30-minute talk about heart disease that Sunday morning at a local church. He asked a simple medical question. I, in turn, responded with a routine answer that all of us physicians give. He appeared confused, but accepting, then sat down. I paused briefly, caught off guard by his demeanor. It was clear that my routine answer was anything but routine for him. For me, the exchange was a reminder that we in the medical field can sometimes be out of touch with the communities we serve, overestimating the degree to which patients are able to make sound health decisions for themselves.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
My older cat seems more lethargic than usual. What might be causing this? As cats age, many develop associated geriatric disorders, as people do. Often, these age-related issues can creep up so slowly that they go almost unnoticed, or are simply attributed to the inevitable passage of time. And while some geriatric conditions are indeed simply the natural order of things, there are a variety of ailments that can detract from a pet's quality of life but are treatable. That's why we highly recommend exams twice a year and more intensive annual screenings for pets over 7 years old, so we know exactly what's going on with our furry friends.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Toni Coleman used to turn to two key ingredients when cooking: sugar and salt. The 68-year-old retired federal government worker figured it probably wasn't healthy, but food just didn't taste good without it. After taking classes offered by the American Heart Association Maryland, the Gwynn Oak resident has learned to cook with herbs, garlic and other fresh ingredients, which has helped her reduce her intake of calories, sodium and other things...
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Carrie O'Connor thought she was a fairly healthy 35-year-old who went on daily jogs and ate well. Then, more than a year ago, she suffered back-to-back heart attacks. The first hit while she was treating herself to baubles at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium. The project manager at T. Rowe Price suddenly felt nauseated and severe pain consumed her stomach. Pain shot up her arm and her jaw ached. All were common symptoms of a heart attack, the paramedics later told her. The second happened later that day when doctors tried to insert a stent to open a blocked left artery they believed had caused the first attack.
EXPLORE
February 3, 2012
Towson Town Center is hosting National Wear Red Day on Friday, Feb. 3, in conjunction with Go Red For Women, a program of the American Heart Association. The event is designed to increase awareness of the threat to women of heart disease and heart attacks. Shoppers are encouraged to wear red to Towson Town Center on Friday. During the day, they can also visit the Grand Court on level 1 between noon and 6 p.m. and have their picture taken, while explaining why they decided to "Go Red. " For each photo taken, Towson Town Center will donate $1 to Go Red for Women, up to $5,000.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | April 13, 1993
Despite the attention we pay to cancer as a health problem, heart disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States, killing more than 250,000 each year. This is more than all cancers combined.Between the ages of 45 and 64, one in nine women will have some form of heart disease, but for those over 65, the figure jumps to one in three.Why does the risk of heart disease increase so dramatically for women over 65?Heart disease increases with age, but in women hormone levels that drop after menopause may also contribute to an increased risk of heart disease.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
John D. "Jack" Gourlay, a retired National Security Agency analyst, died Friday of complications from heart disease at Lorien Mays Chapel in Timonium. He was 82. The son of a tool-and-die maker and a homemaker, John David Gourlay was born in New Kensington, Pa., and graduated in 1949 from Anacostia High School in Washington. Mr. Gourlay served in the Army Security Agency, and then worked for the NSA from 1953 until 1987, when he retired from NSA headquarters at Fort Meade. An intercept operator, Mr. Gourlay was stationed in Japan for nine years and also at Fort Devans, Mass., and Harrogate, Yorkshire, England.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
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