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Heart Attack

HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
It's getting colder outside, but many people still want to get in a daily run, ride or walk. Outdoors exercise can be done safely in lower temperatures, says Dr. David Buchalter an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist at OrthoMaryland. But some precautions are necessary. It's important to stretch, drink fluids and cover your head in the cold. And if your New Year's resolution is to begin exercising this winter, you need to ask yourself some questions first. Question: What's different about cold-weather exercising, and how do you prepare?
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Howard County ambulances are using a new communications system that enables some heart attack victims to get faster, better treatment when they arrive at Howard County General Hospital. Patients experiencing a STEMI — or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, which threatens the heart muscle and requires a balloon angioplasty and a stent to keep an artery open — would benefit from the new technology, officials said. The American Heart Association says 400,000 people suffer STEMI heart attacks each year in the United States.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
From the opening minutes of the sentencing hearing, it was clear that the judge was not well. John N. Prevas leaned so far back in his chair that he disappeared from view of the fixed camera, which picked up only two portraits hanging behind the bench. Only occasionally, when the judge lurched forward, did his crop of white hair and thick glasses jump into view. The judge apologized. He told lawyers at Monday's half-hour hearing that he would sit upright "as soon as my lungs clear, so for the time being, I've been positioning myself most comfortably.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio underwent surgery early Sunday morning after suffering from symptoms consistent with a heart attack. The school released a statement Sunday saying Dantonio was admitted to Sparrow Hospital and doctors performed a cardiac catheterization procedure, in which a small, metallic stent is used to open a blocked blood vessel leading to the heart. "The procedure was successful and blood flow to the heart muscle was restored," said Dr. Chris D'Haem through the school.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2010
Charles E. Johnson Jr. was a hearty 62 in early 2008. He walked about 20 miles a month, worked out four times a week and played tennis on weekends. But he noticed a tightness in his chest sometimes. So he went to St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson and saw Dr. Mark G. Midei, who found significant blockage in three major coronary arteries and used mesh stents to prop open two of them. Johnson says he has been irreversibly disabled ever since. According to a lawsuit filed this year in Baltimore County Circuit Court, the stents caused a blood clot, which led to a heart attack and a series of medical events that left Johnson with permanent heart damage.
HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
What happens in the minutes before an ambulance arrives can make a crucial difference for a heart patient, and Baltimore County emergency officials are promoting advanced CPR training and new, user-friendly equipment as critical in the fight against rising fatalities. At the Perry Hall fire station Thursday, Fire Department officials introduced several residents who survived heart crises, flanked by rescuers they called well-trained, quick-thinking and adept with the latest technology "Today, I am a walking billboard for CPR," said Kenneth "Boh" Hatter, 53, of Towson.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
A Baltimore County jury will begin considering on Thursday morning the case of Benjamin W. Shorter, a former military corpsman who is accused to beating to death a man last year in the men's room of a Catonsville bar. Testimony in Shorter's trial wrapped up Wednesday, after a visit by the jury to Morsberger's Tavern, where Franklin J. Schissler died on March 29, 2009, of what an autopsy determined was a heart attack caused by...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
In a broad effort to speed treatment of heart attack victims in Baltimore, five area hospitals are distributing hand-held devices to every paramedic unit in the city that can transmit patients' heart rhythms, or EKGs, to the hospital before they arrive. Doctors have 90 minutes to open an artery after someone shows symptoms of a serious heart attack before survival becomes far less assured. The hand-held units, which can send information straight to a cardiologist's smart phone, could speed up that treatment by as much as 15 minutes, research shows.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | April 6, 2010
A 64-year-old inmate at the Anne Arundel County Detention Center died late last month of an apparent heart attack while serving jail time for drunken driving, jail officials said Monday. Joseph Powell, of Severn, entered the Ordnance Road facility in Glen Burnie on March 25 to serve the third of five two-day sentences for a drunken-driving conviction. On March 27, Powell was set to be released, "when it appeared he had an upper respiratory episode," said Brenda Shell Eleazer, the correctional facility administrator of the Jennifer Road Detention Center in Annapolis.
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