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Heart Attack

NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
The firefighters at the Earleigh Heights Volunteer Fire Station are on the lookout for new medical equipment that will help them help give heart attack victims a better chance to survive.And there's a good chance they will get it, thanks to the county budget and corporate grants.The budget adopted by the County Council in May includes $119,140 to place automatic external defibrillator machines (AED), which use electrical shocks to re-start a heart stopped by cardiac arrest, in each of the county's 29 fire stations by January 1996.
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SPORTS
August 7, 1991
Former Jackson State and Baltimore Colts standout Willie Richardson was listed in serious condition yesterday, four days after the former All-Pro wide receiver suffered a heart attack playing golf."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1991
PARIS -- Yves Montand, the French actor and singer whose smooth voice and easy manner defined sexiness for more than one generation of admirers around the world, died of a heart attack yesterday. He was 70.His companion, Carole Amiel, with whom he had a son, Valentin, three years ago, was at his bedside.Mr. Montand's last words, reported on French television, were, "I have lived well, and lived well enough not to regret anything."Though he was a popular singer and actor from his start in show business some 47 years ago, Mr. Montand was known equally well for his political activism.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
A Baltimore man accused of first-degree murder and robbery in the death of an 88-year-old traveling salesman who died of a heart attack during a mugging last year has been acquitted of the charges.The jury in Baltimore Circuit Court took about 90 minutes Friday before finding Tony A. Lawson, 31, of the 900 block of E. North Ave., not guilty in the robbery and murder of Frank Altman.Mr. Altman, who despite his age worked full time and was a traveling legend of sorts for the Harry C. Walterhoefer Paper Co., died Nov. 11, 1992, moments after a thief jumped him on his East Baltimore sales route and took his wallet.
SPORTS
By Sam Davis | January 7, 1992
Tragedy has struck the Baltimore high school basketball community again.Larry Ellison, a 17-year-old senior starter for Mervo's basketball team, suffered a fatal heart attack while sleeping at home Jan. 2, Mervo athletic director Woody Williams said.Last April, Rodney Beasley, a starter for Walbrook, died in an automobile accident after an all-star basketball game.Williams said an autopsy revealed that Ellison had an enlarged heart, although there was no previous indication of a medical problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Eddie Griffin's near good riddance to television happened suddenly. Which could not have been soon enough, except for the searing pain in his chest and shortness of breath. At age 28, Griffin was having a heart attack. Make that had a heart attack. He was dead. Griffin would have done anything to leave Malcolm & Eddie, a by-the-numbers sitcom about two guys and a bar. Anything. Except dying. He was smoking three packs a day and inhaling fried chicken and pork-sauteed collard greens.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 8, 1994
BETHESDA -- Federal health officials recommended yesterday that all heart attack patients who need clot-dissolving drugs receive them within 30 minutes of arrival at an emergency room. They issued a set of specific guidelines aimed at reducing the deaths from the leading killer of American adults.The aim is to reduce death and disability by administering timely injections of clot-dissolving drugs such as streptokinase and tpa, which are also known as thrombolytics. The benefit of such therapy has been proven conclusively in several trials involving tens of thousands of heart attack victims in many countries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Regular aspirin use appears to reduce the risk of heart attacks brought on by outbursts of anger, researchers said yesterday.The scientists said surveys of more than 1,600 heart attack patients at dozens of medical centers and hospitals across the country indicate that outbursts of anger more than double the risk of such attacks in the following two hours.But the researchers, from Harvard Medical School and New England Deaconess Hospital in Boston, said it appeared that the use of aspirin "severs the link" between the heart attack and anger as a triggering episode.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg and Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
People who suffer from depression not only endure the well-known symptoms of hopelessness and despair but also run a heightened risk of developing a heart attack, according to a Johns Hopkins study released yesterday.Researchers who followed 2,000 residents of East Baltimore for more than a decade found that those with histories of clinical depression had a 4 1/2 times greater chance of having a heart attack than did those with no such history."For people who are depressed, this is all the more reason to get treated," said Dr. William Eaton, a professor of mental hygiene at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.
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