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Heart Attack

NEWS
April 17, 1992
A 71-year-old Glen Burnie woman died yesterday after she was involved in a head-on collision and suffered a heart attack.Pauline Estella Enders, of the first block of Country Club Drive, was turning left from Furnace Branch Road onto Country Club Drive at 1:33 p.m. when she collided with a car heading north on Furnace Branch, police said.Both drivers received head and chest injuries.Enders suffered a heart attack while still at the accident scene,police said. She was taken by ambulance to North Arundel Hospital, where she died less than an hour after the accident.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 20, 1999
A Pennsylvania motorcyclist apparently suffered a heart attack Wednesday evening before an accident on Littlestown Pike north of Westminster, state police said.Lenny Duane Doan, 37, of Abbottstown in York County was taken to Carroll County General Hospital, where he was pronounced dead soon after the accident, which occurred at 5: 30 p.m., police said.According to a police report, the motorcyclist was traveling north near Bachmans Valley Road when he put his head down on the handlebars of his Yamaha Special 400 and began to lose control of the motorcycle.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | October 26, 1990
A small group of neighborhood residents protested outside a Walbrook grocery store today after a 57-year-old man died when he suffered a heart attack in the store and was taken outside and left on the sidewalk.The protesters urged potential customers and passers-by to boycott the store whose owners yesterday evicted James Drumwright, of Druid Park Drive, apparently believing he was drunk.Angry residents said Drumwright's death was due a lack of sensitivity on the part of Kenney Kang, 31, the owner of the B&M Market in the 3100 block of W. North Ave. Kang, who has owned the market for the past three years, is Korean and the neighborhood is predominantly black.
FEATURES
By Phil Jackman | May 3, 1998
Construction begins any day to turn a 6.1-mile stretch of the old Washington Baltimore & Annapolis rail line between Lanham and Bowie into a recreational trail, and it can't happen soon enough for Morris Warren.Warren, owner of Aberco-Warren Chemical Co. in Bowie and an avid outdoorsman since suffering a heart attack some years back, has worked tirelessly toward getting this stretch of roadbed converted. The dream should come true now by summer of 1999.For his decade-long efforts, he recently was honored by the national Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enriching America's communities and countryside by creating a network of public trails from former rail lines and connecting corridors.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1991
PARIS -- Yves Montand, the French actor and singer whose smooth voice and easy manner defined sexiness for more than one generation of admirers around the world, died of a heart attack yesterday. He was 70.His companion, Carole Amiel, with whom he had a son, Valentin, three years ago, was at his bedside.Mr. Montand's last words, reported on French television, were, "I have lived well, and lived well enough not to regret anything."Though he was a popular singer and actor from his start in show business some 47 years ago, Mr. Montand was known equally well for his political activism.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | July 16, 1991
A HEART ATTACK DOESN'T JUST HAPPEN OUT OF THE blue, says cardiologist Raymond Bahr.A lifetime accumulation of atherosclerotic plaque would first have narrowed a coronary artery, reducing blood flow to the heart. A blood clot, forming in the artery, can then move into the opening, like a stopper in a bottle, closing it off completely and causing a heart attack.But that's not always a sudden event either, according to Dr. Bahr. In the beginning, the clot can act "like a ball valve," in the vessel, he says; and this can cause the come-and-go kind of discomfort, the "stuttering" pain that might be telling you a heart attack is imminent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 1993
NEW YORK -- Emergency treatment should be summoned fo people with symptoms of a stroke because steps to limit brain damage are most effective within the first six hours after the symptoms begin, medical experts say.Newer therapies, some standard and others still experimental, have the potential to limit brain damage from strokes if given in that period, making emergency care all the more critical inpreventing death and disability, the National Stroke Association...
NEWS
January 5, 1996
A 56-year-old Cooksville man swerved off the road after he suffered a heart attack while driving in Jessup yesterday morning, Howard County rescue officials said.Woodrow Snealson was in the intensive care unit at Laurel Regional Hospital in Prince George's County yesterday, said a hospital information assistant.Mr. Snealson's car careened to the road's edge and onto a patch of grass at U.S. 1 and Route 32 about 11:55 a.m. yesterday, said Lt. Sean Kelly, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1990
People who drink four or more cups of coffee a day increase their risk of a heart attack by 40 percent and those at high risk for heart attacks should consider limiting their consumption, researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland, Calif., say in a new study.But the study, which is the latest contribution to a decades-long debate over the possible link between cardiovascular disease and coffee, was immediately assailed by critics."This beverage is consumed by most adults in this country.
SPORTS
By Lori Van Lonkhuyzen and Lori Van Lonkhuyzen,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
Clemson junior forward Devin Gray, who suffered a heart attack three months ago, said he will begin rehabilitation to determine whether he is able to return to the court for the Tigers.Gray, an All-Metro player at St. Frances High, suffered a heart attack April 4, caused by a clogged artery.Gray said he will train five days a week for six weeks, with running, swimming and weightlifting. Doctors plan to gradually take him off the antibiotics he has been taking.Clemson's team physician, Dr. Stuart Clarkson, will decide in October whether Gray will play this season.
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