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September 20, 2010
Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio underwent surgery early Sunday morning after suffering from symptoms consistent with a heart attack. The school released a statement Sunday saying Dantonio was admitted to Sparrow Hospital and doctors performed a cardiac catheterization procedure, in which a small, metallic stent is used to open a blocked blood vessel leading to the heart. "The procedure was successful and blood flow to the heart muscle was restored," said Dr. Chris D'Haem through the school.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
John H. Zink Jr., a retired mechanical engineer and contractor who enjoyed playing gin rummy going to the beach, died July 3 of an apparent heart attack. He was 95. Mr. Zink was lunching and playing cards with friends at the Green Spring Club when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Northwest Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, family members said. The son of John Henry Zink, founder of the Heat & Power Corp., and Isabelle Greer Seipp Zink, a homemaker, John Henry Zink Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised at Mayfair, his family's farm, which is now the site of the Mays Chapel community in Timonium.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A 58-year-old Baltimore County firefighter died Friday afternoon after he suffered a suspected heart attack during training, officials said. Robert Fogle III, a 27-year veteran and career firefighter, was participating in exercises at the Sparrows Point training facility when he became ill. He was taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. "It just reminds us about the sacrifice that our first responders do each and every day and the risks that they take to be fit and capable of helping others," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said.
HEALTH
By Sandy Alexander and Special to the Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2010
For two days in July, Marcelette Lee thought she was coming down with the flu. When she started vomiting, she headed to her doctor's office. By the time she arrived, she was short of breath. It turned out she was having a heart attack and needed triple-bypass surgery. In the six months since, Lee, 54, of Randallstown, has been taking medication, exercising and watching what she eats. She said those efforts have been focused on more than increasing her time on the treadmill or lowering her cholesterol levels.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Howard County ambulances are using a new communications system that enables some heart attack victims to get faster, better treatment when they arrive at Howard County General Hospital. Patients experiencing a STEMI — or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, which threatens the heart muscle and requires a balloon angioplasty and a stent to keep an artery open — would benefit from the new technology, officials said. The American Heart Association says 400,000 people suffer STEMI heart attacks each year in the United States.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
The new year brings a lot of resolutions to exercise. And sometimes the cold weather also means more snow shoveling. All that exertion can be harmful to people with abnormal hearts by leading to sudden cardiac arrest. Dr. Gordon Tomaselli, director of cardiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, talks about the difference between sudden cardiac arrest and a heart attack and what those at risk can do. Question: What is sudden cardiac arrest? Answer: Sudden cardiac arrest refers to collapse and loss of consciousness due to a dramatic fall in blood pressure.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 8, 2012
Health insurance was a better predictor of survival from health attacks and strokes than race, according to Johns Hopkins researchers who looked at health outcomes in some Maryland hospitals. Specifically, those who did not have coverage were more likely to die in the hospital, even after accounting for race and socioeconomic factors, according to the researchers at the Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health . “African Americans living in poor, urban neighborhoods bear a high burden of illnesses and early death, from cardiovascular disease in particular,” said Derek Ng, lead author of the study and graduate student in the department of epidemiology, in a statement.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | November 13, 2012
These two tweets ( here and here ) pretty much summarize the opinions expressed by many people in the WWE Universe in response to part of a segment involving CM Punk, Paul Heyman, Mick Foley and a returning Jerry "The King" Lawler. After what was a thunderous reception for "The King", who returned to work after suffering a heart attack during a live RAW broadcast in Montreal on Sept. 10 , CM Punk and Paul Heyman interrupted Lawler's "thank you" speech. CM Punk centered his promo largely on Lawler's heart attack, calling it a "stunt" and saying that had Lawler stayed in the ring he would have "beaten him to death.
SPORTS
By N.Y. Times News Service | September 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- Arthur Ashe was hospitalized because of a mil heart attack Thursday night, but he seemed to be taking his latest medical setback in stride."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
A Severna Park man died from an apparent heart attack while boating on an Anne Arundel County creek, Maryland Natural Resources Police said Saturday. Frederick Ervin Jr., 56, and a friend were taking a boat out for the first time this year on Crownsville's Plum Creek at about 5:30 p.m. on Friday when Ervin felt sick, said Sgt. Brian Albert, a police spokesman. Plum Creek is a tributary of the Severn River. Ervin went to the side of the 33-foot center console power boat and leaned over, falling into the water, Albert said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Carrie O'Connor thought she was a fairly healthy 35-year-old who went on daily jogs and ate well. Then, more than a year ago, she suffered back-to-back heart attacks. The first hit while she was treating herself to baubles at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium. The project manager at T. Rowe Price suddenly felt nauseated and severe pain consumed her stomach. Pain shot up her arm and her jaw ached. All were common symptoms of a heart attack, the paramedics later told her. The second happened later that day when doctors tried to insert a stent to open a blocked left artery they believed had caused the first attack.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A Glenn Dale woman died of an apparent heart attack after shoveling snow on Monday afternoon, according to Prince George's County Fire and EMS Department officials. Department spokesman Mark Brady said the woman, who was in her 60s, went into cardiac arrest after shoveling snow. She was transported to a local hospital and pronounced dead, Brady said. The exact cause of death will be determined by a chief medical examiner, Brady said. No other local jurisdictions have reported snow-related deaths from Monday's storm.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 13, 2014
Heavy wet snow, like the kind that is on the ground now in the Baltimore region , can be a major threat to a person's heart, according to local and national health officials. The American Heart Association says most people will not have any ill effects from exertion, but shoveling and even just walking can increase risk in others. To make the situation safer, the association reminds people they should take frequent breaks, don't eat a heavy meal before or soon after shoveling and use a small shover so the loads are lighter.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Donna L. Hansen, a former congressional staffer whose lifelong struggle with diabetes led her to become an advocate for diabetes and cardiac research, died Nov. 15 from heart and kidney failure at Carroll Hospice's Dove House. The Sykesville resident was 56. "She was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 8 years old, suffered her first heart attack when she was 21, and a second heart attack when she was 31," said her husband of 25 years, Steven Hansen. "When her heart disease forced her to quit full-time work, she devoted herself to helping those with diabetes and cardiac disease, and helped initiate an important new outreach program in her Columbia church," said Mr. Hansen.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Carrie O'Connor thought she was a fairly healthy 35-year-old who went on daily jogs and ate well. Then, more than a year ago, she suffered back-to-back heart attacks. The first hit while she was treating herself to baubles at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium. The project manager at T. Rowe Price suddenly felt nauseated and severe pain consumed her stomach. Pain shot up her arm and her jaw ached. All were common symptoms of a heart attack, the paramedics later told her. The second happened later that day when doctors tried to insert a stent to open a blocked left artery they believed had caused the first attack.
SPORTS
February 5, 1993
Jack Kramp, the veteran Anne Arundel Umpires Association chief, suffered a heart attack Wednesday night, but is resting comfortably in the coronary unit at North Arundel Hospital.Kramp, who turns 37 on Monday, has had a history of back problems preventing him from umpiring, but no prior heart problems. He said he experienced his heart attack upon arriving at the hospital.L "I was having back spasms and got one real bad," said Kramp."After taking my pulse a couple times and getting nothing, my heart started to flutter, and I decided to go to North Arundel.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | September 29, 2013
Gene "Cousin Luke" Petit passed away Sunday morning, according to a report from Mike Johnson of PWInsider . The cause of death is currently unknown. Petit had been suffering from multiple sclerosis in recent years, which caused him to lose a considerable amount of weight. Petit is best known as portraying "Cousin Luke" in WWE in 1985 and 1986 as part of Hillbilly Jim's family. Hillbilly Jim is now the only member still alive -- Uncle Elmer (Stan Frazier) died in 1992 from kidney failure and Cousin Junior (Larry Kean)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
It was hard for Arthur Jones not to think the worst. His family had endured so many significant medical issues, from his sister, Carmen , dying of brain cancer before her 18th birthday to his mother, Camille , losing her sight from diabetes, to his father, Arthur Jr ., needing open-heart surgery. Jones wasn't sure what was wrong with him. All he knew was that his heart was racing and doctors couldn't immediately tell him why. The Ravens' starting defensive tackle had just made two tackles, including one behind the line of scrimmage, in a preseason loss to the Carolina Panthers at M&T Bank Stadium.
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