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NEWS
May 31, 2014
On Wednesday, just for a moment, my heart stopped. The same way it stopped when I heard that Toni Cade Bambara had breast cancer and when I heard that Nelson Mandela had passed away. It stopped the same way that my grandmother's heart stopped when she received the news about the deaths of John F. Kennedy, Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers, and the Four Little Girls. It only stopped for a moment as I realized that the world had lost a giant and for some of us, things would never be the same again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
If you're an Orioles fan and you're concerned about the fact that the two wild-card teams have made it to the League Championship Series round of the postseason, there's no reason to fret about it. I've always believed that the wild-card teams had a bit of an emotional advantage entering the playoffs, because they generally have to grind right to the final weekend of the season before punching their ticket to the playoffs. It seems logical and it has held true over the course of the wild-card era. However, it's going to matter less in the LCS round because everybody has been playing tough, tight games through the first two playoff rounds.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 1, 2011
Elizabeth Warren is a native of Oklahoma, but she might as well be from Baltimore based on the reception the city gave her Thursday night. She spoke at a town hall meeting held by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings to talk about the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau she’s setting up. Given the big applause and standing ovation, you might assume that there wasn’t a banker or anyone from the industry in the crowd. But not true. Kathleen Murphy, president of the Maryland Bankers Association, sat in the first row. Cummings gave a shout out to Murphy for coming to the event.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Columnist Jules Witcover claims that "many fellow Democrats" were of the opinion that President Barack Obama lacked a spine but that his recent call to the international community "to step up to the challenge of global terrorism" now suggests he has acquired one ( "U.N. speech may indicate a tougher Obama," Sept. 29). In my opinion President Obama has always had a spine. For example, while still a senator he condemned the madness of the Bush administration's wars. Later he called for closing down the Guantanamo concentration camp.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | October 26, 2011
For the last year and a half, this column has focused on a wide variety of home and garden stories—how to pick the best flooring for your needs, and what colors are going to be trendy next year, a behind-the-front-door glimpse into some of Baltimore's most intriguing residences. Unlike many of my colleagues, I have gotten to tell happy stories. I hope I have been entertaining and helpful along the way. So in this, my last column (at least for now), don't expect some tawdry expose of how people "really live" behind closed doors.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2010
I t's Valentine's Day 2010, and Janet of Janet's World is nowhere to be found. Apparently, she has taken the day off to engage in a love fest of activities. These include, but are not limited to: cooking with chocolate, watching romantic comedies and writing the kind of sappy poetry she penned while growing up in a constant state of crushes on guys who could not possibly know she existed - from David Cassidy of "The Partridge Family" to Ron Howard of "Happy Days." In her stead, a special guest columnist appears today, Aunt Tenaj, who will answer your urgent, family-friendly love questions.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A Glenn Dale woman died of an apparent heart attack after shoveling snow on Monday afternoon, according to Prince George's County Fire and EMS Department officials. Department spokesman Mark Brady said the woman, who was in her 60s, went into cardiac arrest after shoveling snow. She was transported to a local hospital and pronounced dead, Brady said. The exact cause of death will be determined by a chief medical examiner, Brady said. No other local jurisdictions have reported snow-related deaths from Monday's storm.
NEWS
By Betsy Rumberger | June 8, 2000
ONCE THERE lived a teacher who enjoyed working with children. Frequently the teacher said that she preferred the company of children to adults. Every day, she would teach her students and at night head home feeling tired but happy. At about the beginning of April, just as the earth was starting to smell like daffodils and butterflies, a scary thing happened. After a wonderful day in the classroom, the teacher went home feeling ill. She did not feel too bad at first - just a little different, as if she had a small tickle in the back of her throat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 4, 2001
It may have been icy cold outside, but inside the 5th Regiment Armory, hints of spring were everywhere at the American Heart Association's Heart Ball. Large backdrops painted as forests lined the walls, while corners of the room boasted clusters of real trees. Dining tables sprouted centerpieces of forsythia branches, daffodils and iris. Dinner began with a taste of winter, though. Each guest was greeted at his seat with a seafood appetizer sitting on a block of ice carved into a heart.
NEWS
By Staff Report | January 10, 1993
If you rely on Parke-Davis' Nitrostat to relieve severe heart pains, health officials say it is safe to use alternative nitroglycerin products while that brand remains scarce.Dr. Roger Blumenthal of the Johns Hopkins Henry Ciccarone Preventive Cardiology Center said that the temporary shortage of 0.4 mg nitroglycerin pills from the nation's leading provider is temporary. setback. Nitroglycerin is widely used to improve blood flow to the heart."People will be able to use 0.3 mg tablets or nitroglycerin patches and sprays, which are just as effective," Dr. Blumenthal said.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Orioles center fielder Adam Jones glides through the home clubhouse in a T-shirt and basketball shorts, razzing everyone he passes with a bellowing voice and an even louder cackle. On the other side of the room is right fielder Nick Markakis, sitting quietly at his locker, rarely looking up. Markakis' choice of nonbaseball duds is often tan and green camouflage. Earlier this season Markakis walked into Camden Yards in head-to-toe camo, looking as if he had just vacated a tree stand in the woods.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Continuing to emerge as a major entertainment presence in Annapolis, Compass Rose Theater has opened its fourth season with Lorraine Hansberry's powerful 1959 drama, "A Raisin in the Sun," visiting issues of justice and equal opportunity that continue to resonate with audiences today. Groundbreaking 55 years ago as the first Broadway play written by a black female author, "A Raisin in the Sun" not only changed American theater, but offered hope for a future when the dreams of African-American families would no longer be deferred.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
Not long ago, it was suggested by more than one sportswriter that the Baltimore Orioles would never again win the American League East. Not merely because they were bad (although during the post-1997 cellar-dwelling years, they certainly were) but because the checkbook-advantaged franchises in New York and Boston had too great an advantage in the age of free agency. So that raucous celebration by players and fans alike Tuesday evening at Camden Yards after the Orioles clinched the division with an 8-2 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays was understandable and well-deserved.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Edgar Allan Poe once wrote that those who dream during the day "are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night. " So it seems entirely fitting that Baltimore can spend the first Purple Friday - or dare we say, Orange-Purple Friday - of September daydreaming of a Ravens-Orioles championship season. Technically, the Ravens can't win a championship in 2014, as that feat was accomplished by some team out of Seattle last winter (coincidentally, a fellow member of the bird family)
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 26, 2014
Hollywood has come up with some fearsome swarms of monstrous villains -- think of the orcs in "The Hobbit" or the zombies in "World War Z" -- but those computer-generated creatures are nothing compared to the all-too-real swarm of monsters that have rallied to the black banner of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. ISIS (or ISIL, the alternative version of the name that substitutes the broader geographic term, Levant, for Syria) may be the most despicable band of barbarians to plague the world since the Khmer Rouge finished stacking up the skulls of their victims in Cambodia 35 years ago. Emerging from the chaos of the Syrian civil war, ISIS militants have swept across the Iraqi desert and seized control in much of that country over the last two months.
NEWS
By STEPHEN VICCHIO | February 14, 1995
There is an awful warmth about my heartlike a load of immortality.John Keats, ''Letters''Controlling one's heart is as easy as cutting granite with a razor, or mooring a ship with a single silken thread.John Henry Newman, ''Letters''I remember my mother hanging clothes in winter light. It was Valentine's Day, and tiny icicles had formed on the wooden clothes pins that held my father's stiff work shirts to the frozen line. I stayed home sick from school, though the evening before I methodically had prepared the small red hearts I planned to distribute to a few favorite girls among my sixth-grade classmates.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
During a checkup, my doctor said that my examination and tests were normal except for left ventricular hypertrophy on the electrocardiogram. What causes left ventricular hypertrophy. Is it dangerous? Can it be treated?Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an enlargement of the left ventricle, the heart chamber that pumps blood through the aorta to all of the body except the lungs. The enlargement may involve either thickening of the wall of the left ventricle or an increase in the size of the chamber itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
How can it have been 38 years since Heart's “Magic Man” became an FM radio staple? Saturday night at Pier Six Pavilion, before a near-sold-out house, the Wilson sisters - lead singer Ann with guitarist Nancy - and their band's latest incarnation played a tight, straight-ahead 90-minute set short on spontaneity and surprises, but plenty long on the propulsive rock 'n' roll that earned Heart a place in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Their fans clearly loved it, and for good reason: this was classic rock with an oomph, a well-oiled hit machine that shows little sign of wearing down anytime soon.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
On Tuesday, the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association named center fielder Adam Jones as the Orioles' recipient of the 2014 Heart and Hustle Award. The honor values athletes who “demonstrate a passion for the game of baseball and best embody the values, spirit and tradition of the game” and is the only big league award voted on by former players. Jones, along with the 29 winners from the other clubs, was selected for his work ethic and passion for baseball. “He represents all the best qualities of a teammate and competitor,” Brooks Robinson, Orioles Hall of Fame third baseman and Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association president, said in a statement.
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