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May 1, 2011
The news of the often-tearful reception given Mayor William Donald Schaefer's last motorcade put me in mind of a similar procession in 1839. President Van Buren and his cabinet led the procession, right behind the hearse. Ships in the harbor lowered their flags. As the hearse passed, adults and children were seen crying in the street; many joined the procession. It was the biggest funeral in Baltimore up to then. Samuel Smith, the man they were honoring, had served 40 years in the U.S. Congress after two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates.
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Letter to The Aegis | June 21, 2012
Editor: Under normal circumstances I generally wouldn't write an editorial, BUT this one is so needed. Whatever happened to being respectful on our roads when a funeral procession is in progress? On Saturday, June 9, we were saddened because we were burying my Dad, Sam Mullins. As if this isn't already an upsetting experience in itself, it was complicated by the outright ignorance and total lack of respect for the deceased, his family, his friends and the staff of McComas in Abingdon.
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Letter to The Aegis | June 21, 2012
Editor: Under normal circumstances I generally wouldn't write an editorial, BUT this one is so needed. Whatever happened to being respectful on our roads when a funeral procession is in progress? On Saturday, June 9, we were saddened because we were burying my Dad, Sam Mullins. As if this isn't already an upsetting experience in itself, it was complicated by the outright ignorance and total lack of respect for the deceased, his family, his friends and the staff of McComas in Abingdon.
NEWS
May 1, 2011
The news of the often-tearful reception given Mayor William Donald Schaefer's last motorcade put me in mind of a similar procession in 1839. President Van Buren and his cabinet led the procession, right behind the hearse. Ships in the harbor lowered their flags. As the hearse passed, adults and children were seen crying in the street; many joined the procession. It was the biggest funeral in Baltimore up to then. Samuel Smith, the man they were honoring, had served 40 years in the U.S. Congress after two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 27, 2011
Schaefer's interment at Dulaney Valley Light showers swept the lawns at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens as the William Donald Schaefer funeral cortege arrived about 2:20 p.m. The National Weather Service had issued a tornado watch for the Baltimore region. Schaefer's hearse was preceded up the drive by The Fire Brigade Pipes & Drums of Greater Baltimore, playing bagpipe music and a slow drum cadence. The hearse was escorted by four police officers on motorcycles, followed by a dark, rider-less horse, which symbolizes a fallen leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff | April 25, 2004
WASHINGTON -- When veteran newswoman Mary McGrory is buried this week, she will leave a legacy of words -- columns known for their searing insight, whimsical prose and unshakable convictions. McGrory, who died Wednesday at age 85, loved being wherever history was happening. At The Washington Star, she wrote Washington as theater. She won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1974 for her coverage of Watergate. In 1981, she moved on to The Washington Post, where her syndicated columns were never timid in their liberal outlook or curiosity about the world.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Alfred Grayson Ritter Jr., founder and owner of Ritter M & M Sales Inc., which supplied emergency vehicles and hearses to fire departments, rescue squads and funeral homes in the Mid-Atlantic region, died Oct. 29 from complications of a stroke at Blakehurst, the Towson retirement community where he had resided since 1994. He was 84.The former longtime Cockeysville and Sparks resident owned Ritter Jeep Sales in Timonium from 1957 until 1961, when he established Ritter M & M Sales.Mr. Ritter, a handsome and kindly man who thought nothing of putting in 90-hour, seven-day work weeks, traveled throughout Maryland, Delaware and Virginia selling Miller-Medeor vehicles to rescue squads and funeral homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | May 21, 2000
After a long day of exchanges with co-workers, few pleasures can match the combined satisfactions of a comfortable chair, a good light, a snack or drink within reach, and a book in which disagreeable people meet violent death. Thanks to the indefatigable industry of mystery writers, and the inexhaustible optimism of their publishers, whole forests fall to pulp to allow readers to plunge vicariously into darkness. The dozens produced each year offer all imaginable categories -- historical settings, exotic locales, English maiden ladies, West Coast tough guys -- with veteran writers adding another notch to a series and tyros imitating previous successes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Joel Obermayer and Peter Hermann and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writers | November 17, 1994
An East Baltimore man was charged this morning with decapitating a fortune teller who was the matriarch of a powerful Gypsy family in Baltimore and whose advice he had sought in the past.Douglas Thomas Clark, 28, of the 2200 block of E. Lombard St., was charged with first-degree murder in connection with yesterday's slaying of Deborah Stevens, which jolted a clan that traces its Baltimore heritage to the turn of the century.Officer Robert W. Weinhold Jr., a police spokesman, said investigators had not recovered a weapon and knew of no motive.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Joel Obermayer and Peter Hermann and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writers | November 17, 1994
The matriarch of a powerful Gypsy family was found decapitated in her East Baltimore home yesterday morning, jolting a clan that traces its Baltimore heritage to the turn of the century.Deborah Stevens, 62, who had worked as a palm reader and fortune teller out of her Pulaski Highway house for three decades, was a revered and respected member of what once was the most powerful Gypsy band in the nation.Known to give refuge to caravans of Gypsies who follow carnivals up and down the East Coast, Ms. Stevens was related to King Dick Stevens, a national Gypsy leader who operated a Cherry Hill coppersmith shop from the 1920s until his death in 1959.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 27, 2011
Schaefer's interment at Dulaney Valley Light showers swept the lawns at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens as the William Donald Schaefer funeral cortege arrived about 2:20 p.m. The National Weather Service had issued a tornado watch for the Baltimore region. Schaefer's hearse was preceded up the drive by The Fire Brigade Pipes & Drums of Greater Baltimore, playing bagpipe music and a slow drum cadence. The hearse was escorted by four police officers on motorcycles, followed by a dark, rider-less horse, which symbolizes a fallen leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff | April 25, 2004
WASHINGTON -- When veteran newswoman Mary McGrory is buried this week, she will leave a legacy of words -- columns known for their searing insight, whimsical prose and unshakable convictions. McGrory, who died Wednesday at age 85, loved being wherever history was happening. At The Washington Star, she wrote Washington as theater. She won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1974 for her coverage of Watergate. In 1981, she moved on to The Washington Post, where her syndicated columns were never timid in their liberal outlook or curiosity about the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | May 21, 2000
After a long day of exchanges with co-workers, few pleasures can match the combined satisfactions of a comfortable chair, a good light, a snack or drink within reach, and a book in which disagreeable people meet violent death. Thanks to the indefatigable industry of mystery writers, and the inexhaustible optimism of their publishers, whole forests fall to pulp to allow readers to plunge vicariously into darkness. The dozens produced each year offer all imaginable categories -- historical settings, exotic locales, English maiden ladies, West Coast tough guys -- with veteran writers adding another notch to a series and tyros imitating previous successes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Alfred Grayson Ritter Jr., founder and owner of Ritter M & M Sales Inc., which supplied emergency vehicles and hearses to fire departments, rescue squads and funeral homes in the Mid-Atlantic region, died Oct. 29 from complications of a stroke at Blakehurst, the Towson retirement community where he had resided since 1994. He was 84.The former longtime Cockeysville and Sparks resident owned Ritter Jeep Sales in Timonium from 1957 until 1961, when he established Ritter M & M Sales.Mr. Ritter, a handsome and kindly man who thought nothing of putting in 90-hour, seven-day work weeks, traveled throughout Maryland, Delaware and Virginia selling Miller-Medeor vehicles to rescue squads and funeral homes.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
On September 25, 2005, CHARLES WILBERT HERNDON, Ornamental Tree and Shrubery Expert and beloved son of the late Harry and Mabel Herndon; loving brother of Billie Delores Harris and May Irene Ayers. Also survived by nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews. Family and friends are invited to attend an Graveside Service on Saturday at 10 A.M. at the Lorraine Park Cemetery. Those desiring may meet at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home, Inc., 3631 Falls Rd at 9:15 A.M. on Saturday to follow the hearse to the cemetery.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
ALTHORP HOUSE, Northamptonshire -- On a tiny island, set in a small lake, Diana, Princess of Wales was laid to rest yesterday at her ancient Northamptonshire home.The "People's Princess" was brought here in a hearse after the grand procession and funeral in London's Westminster Abbey. Buried with her was a rosary given to her by Mother Teresa.It took the cortege about two hours to cover the 68 miles from Central London to the gates of Althorp. People watched in towns and villages along the way. The fever of grief of the past week seemed to be abating.
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