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Hearing Loss

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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Millions of people with hearing loss are not using hearing aids, according to new research by Johns Hopkins scientists. Nearly 6.7 million Americans age 50 and older have hearing loss, but only  one in seven uses a hearing aid, according to the new research. The Hopkins researchers said it shows how under treated hearing loss is. It is the most expansive data analysis on the subject ever. “Understanding current rates of hearing loss treatment is important, as evidence is beginning to surface that hearing loss is associated with poorer cognitive functioning and the risk of dementia,” study senior investigator, otologist and epidemiologist Frank Lin said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Amtrak has launched a new "Txt-A-Tip" program that allows riders and employees to report suspicious or criminal activity on the rail service via text message, the company announced Wednesday. The program adds a new option, accessible to those with hearing loss or who are deaf, to an existing phone line for such reports. "Our passengers and frontline employees provide an extra line of defense by being an additional set of eyes and ears while in or around our stations, trains, facilities or right-of-way, and now they can report crime or suspicious activity in a convenient and discreet method, by text message," said Amtrak Police Chief Polly Hanson in a statement.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Adults who lose their hearing later in life also are more likely to have a hard time concentrating on a book or remembering a simple conversation, Johns Hopkins research has found. The same brain functions that affect hearing also may cause problems with memory and other cognitive function, according to the study, published this month in JAMA Internal Medicine. It is the latest to support a link between hearing loss and decline of memory. The Hopkins researchers said that many people view hearing loss as an inconvenience of old age but that it may also contribute to more serious health problems.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Sometimes it's the simplest ideas that have the biggest impact, and Dan Simon is hoping his will prevent the hearing damage suffered by thousands of military personnel - the top reported service disability in the war on terror. Simon, an engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, and several of his colleagues have modified a generic set of rubbery, orange earplugs to develop an inexpensive "Anti-Blast Earplug. " Simon says the device, which the team has tentatively named the ABLE, allows wearers to hear normally until there's an explosion, such as those created by an improvised explosive device, or IED, the signature weapon of the enemy in Afghanistan and Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Former Baltimorean Katherine Bouton abruptly lost the hearing in her left ear at age 30. One minute she could hear, and the next, she could not. Over the decades, her impairment worsened. By the time she was 60, she was functionally deaf. But her reluctance to disclose her ailment only increased. And who can blame her? She worked in a highly competitive environment, as a senior editor at The New York Times. In retrospect, Bouton says, remaining silent was a mistake; her hearing impairment contributed to her abrupt departure after 22 years at the newspaper.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
One in five Americans has significant hearing loss, far more than previously thought, according to new research that has scientists warning of an impending public health threat. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University say the growing number of seniors in the United States are at risk of isolation from their hearing loss and could suffer physical and mental debilitation. "People think hearing loss is an inconsequential part of getting older," said Dr. Frank Lin, an assistant professor in Hopkins' department of otolaryngology-head and neck, who led the study.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
Regarding your recent article about people not using their hearing aids, I have a love/hate relationship with mine "People with hearing loss not using aids, study shows," Feb. 14). I can set the volume on mine at three different levels to hear better but, alas, any background noise is also amplified. That doesn't do much good in a noisy situation. Sometimes I can hear people six to 10 feet away better than someone sitting across the table from me. In frustration, I will turn my hearing aid off or just take it out and do the best I can. Until they make a hearing aid that can discriminate among sounds like my brain could before I had hearing loss - and one that doesn't cost an arm and a leg - I will just have to make the best of a bad situation.
NEWS
September 21, 2008
The Glenwood Senior Center, 2400 Route 97, Cooksville, will offer a program about hearing loss with Dr. Ron Kaplan, "This Isn't Your Mother's Hearing Aid," at 10 a.m. Oct. 7. He will discuss hearing loss, why it happens and the new digital technology of hearing aids. Registration is requested by Oct. 6. Admission is free. http://www.highlandmd.org/arts&letters.html.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | July 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When your teen-age child or friend is ignoring you, it may not be a sullen pout. He or she may not hear you.Thanks to lawn mowers, chain saws, firecrackers, target-shooting and high-decibel stereos, young people increasingly are destroying their inner-ear cells that process sound and are slowly but surely going deaf."
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
Motorists and pedestrians need to hear firetrucks approaching. But some firefighters say the sirens are too loud - and they hold manufacturers responsible for their hearing loss. Nearly 2,500 veteran firefighters across the country have joined in "mass tort" lawsuits accusing an Illinois siren-maker of marketing a defective product that damaged their hearing. "The defect is that the firefighters are behind the siren, and there's no design element to reduce the flow of decibels to them," said Jordan Margolis, a Chicago personal injury lawyer and the plaintiffs' lead attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Former Baltimorean Katherine Bouton abruptly lost the hearing in her left ear at age 30. One minute she could hear, and the next, she could not. Over the decades, her impairment worsened. By the time she was 60, she was functionally deaf. But her reluctance to disclose her ailment only increased. And who can blame her? She worked in a highly competitive environment, as a senior editor at The New York Times. In retrospect, Bouton says, remaining silent was a mistake; her hearing impairment contributed to her abrupt departure after 22 years at the newspaper.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Adults who lose their hearing later in life also are more likely to have a hard time concentrating on a book or remembering a simple conversation, Johns Hopkins research has found. The same brain functions that affect hearing also may cause problems with memory and other cognitive function, according to the study, published this month in JAMA Internal Medicine. It is the latest to support a link between hearing loss and decline of memory. The Hopkins researchers said that many people view hearing loss as an inconvenience of old age but that it may also contribute to more serious health problems.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 23, 2012
Two years after the Ravens selected him in the second round of the 2010 NFL draft, linebacker Sergio Kindle has yet to make a start, a tackle or a significant impact on the team's fortunes. An opportunity has presented itself to Kindle in the form of a season-threatening Achilles injury to Terrell Suggs, but he insists his mindset hasn't changed. To him, every season is make or break. “I feel that way every year because I haven't proven anything yet,” Kindle said Wednesday.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
Regarding your recent article about people not using their hearing aids, I have a love/hate relationship with mine "People with hearing loss not using aids, study shows," Feb. 14). I can set the volume on mine at three different levels to hear better but, alas, any background noise is also amplified. That doesn't do much good in a noisy situation. Sometimes I can hear people six to 10 feet away better than someone sitting across the table from me. In frustration, I will turn my hearing aid off or just take it out and do the best I can. Until they make a hearing aid that can discriminate among sounds like my brain could before I had hearing loss - and one that doesn't cost an arm and a leg - I will just have to make the best of a bad situation.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Millions of people with hearing loss are not using hearing aids, according to new research by Johns Hopkins scientists. Nearly 6.7 million Americans age 50 and older have hearing loss, but only  one in seven uses a hearing aid, according to the new research. The Hopkins researchers said it shows how under treated hearing loss is. It is the most expansive data analysis on the subject ever. “Understanding current rates of hearing loss treatment is important, as evidence is beginning to surface that hearing loss is associated with poorer cognitive functioning and the risk of dementia,” study senior investigator, otologist and epidemiologist Frank Lin said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
One in five Americans has significant hearing loss, far more than previously thought, according to new research that has scientists warning of an impending public health threat. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University say the growing number of seniors in the United States are at risk of isolation from their hearing loss and could suffer physical and mental debilitation. "People think hearing loss is an inconsequential part of getting older," said Dr. Frank Lin, an assistant professor in Hopkins' department of otolaryngology-head and neck, who led the study.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2007
Say what? Having trouble getting the buzz at the party because there's too much, er, buzz? Do those "s's," "f's," "t's" and "th's" sound too much alike? A growing number of forty and fiftysomethings, baby boomers who grew up on rock music, played in bands and have enjoyed living loud in general, are seeking a new form of high-tech relief: Digital hearing devices that help recapture the high pitch frequency sounds they're beginning to lose. A 2004 study by the Better Hearing Institute shows that more than 12 million people ages 45 to 64 are encountering hearing problems - and that two-thirds of Americans with hearing loss are below retirement age. Another survey by the Ear Foundation projects that nearly half (49 percent)
NEWS
By McClatchy -Tribune | December 23, 2008
They're called the iPod Generation - all those kids wired to earbuds and MP3 players this holiday season as they hunker down to endure long road trips or relatives that visit even longer. But they're at risk of becoming the "Huh? What?" Generation. With the increasing popularity of MP3 players - and the loud, long listening habits of today's youth - millions of children and teens are at a newfound risk of noise-induced hearing loss. Doctors around the country say they are seeing younger and younger patients with hearing loss symptoms that typically don't occur before middle age. Many of them blame constant use of iPods and other players that blare music directly into ears.
NEWS
October 5, 2008
The Glenwood Senior Center, 2400 Route 97, Cooksville, will sponsor a Halloween and Harvest Bingo at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 14. Take a Halloween or fall treat to be used as a bingo prize. Free admission. Registration is requested by Friday. The Glenwood Community Book Club will meet at the senior center at 10 a.m. Wednesday and Nov. 5. The group will discuss Peace Like a River by Leif Enger on Wednesday. The center will offer a Painting and Drawing Open Studio from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesdays.
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