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NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 1999
A BIG thank you goes out to the folks of Linthicum and surrounding areas who donated hundreds of used eyeglasses and several hearing aids for a Linthicum Lions Club project.Marlene Stivers, president of Lions, said she was overwhelmed by the generosity. "Our club alone was able to fill one and a half large boxes," she said.Club members Peggy Samuels, Beth Sandifer, Michael Friedel and Stivers' husband, Jerry, joined her Oct. 16 in the delivery to a collection site at the Ellicott City Lions Hall, where they, along with members of 36 Lions Clubs in District 22, sorted and packaged them.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 5, 2013
Ravens Ray Lewis climbing Mount Kilimanjaro Retired Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis embarked Wednesday on a climb of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest point in Africa at an elevation of 19,340 feet. Lewis is joined on the trip by Doug Pitt , the brother of actor Brad Pitt and a goodwill ambassador in Tanzania, and retired Pro Bowl Chicago Bears defensive lineman Tommie Harris . Lewis is raising money and awareness about the need for clean water in East Africa. The climb is scheduled to continue through Monday.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | February 1, 2007
The closer we get to Super Bowl Sunday, the more celebrities flock to the Miami area to enjoy the party scene and participate in a wide variety of corporate and NFL-sponsored events. Rocker Ozzy Osbourne, for instance, is scheduled to appear at an NFL charity event at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino today to distribute $1 million worth of hearing aids to needy kids. Yes, you heard that right - delicious irony fans - the former front man for Black Sabbath is going to be handing out hundreds of free hearing aids ... all these years after our parents warned us that listening to hard rock was going to damage our hearing.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Peter Marvit, a 51-year-old scientist who sang with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and sought to widen music education opportunities for city students, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital after he was shot near his Northeast Baltimore home last Monday night. He had been returning home from a choral rehearsal. "If there was anyone who really had a great love of the city, he was it," said Susie Brandt, his companion, who also said he had diverse interests. "He never wanted to be boring.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration said yesterday that it has warned the nation's six largest manufacturers of hearing aids to stop "misleading the public" about the effectiveness of their products or face regulatory action.In letters sent April 16, the agency told the companies that their advertising, promotion and labeling create "unrealistic expectations" about the devices.About 5.8 million Americans wear hearing aids, and an estimated 10 million persons older than 65 suffer from some form of hearing loss, the agency said.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
David Saks, whose efforts on behalf of people with hearing problems led to a federal law requiring that certain telephones be compatible with hearing aids, died of heart failure Wednesday at the Northwest Hospital Center. The Randallstown resident was 81.Mr. Saks retired in 1973 as owner of Wayside Furniture, which he operated in the Baynesville area for about 20 years after working as a furniture salesman.His wife, the former Reba Sigel, who died in 1993, had served as interior designer in the business.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Peter Marvit, a 51-year-old scientist who sang with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and sought to widen music education opportunities for city students, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital after he was shot near his Northeast Baltimore home last Monday night. He had been returning home from a choral rehearsal. "If there was anyone who really had a great love of the city, he was it," said Susie Brandt, his companion, who also said he had diverse interests. "He never wanted to be boring.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
Scott and Emily Levin were shocked to learn a few weeks after their son Ryan was born that he could not hear noises much quieter than banging pots and pans. They were stunned again to find out that their health insurance did not cover the $5,000 in hearing aids doctors prescribed for their baby. With a cooing 6-month-old sporting listening devices in each ear, the Owings Mills couple journeyed to Annapolis yesterday to ask the General Assembly to require health insurers to pay for hearing aids for children.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2003
NOT MANY kids become published authors while in fourth grade. Fewer still receive their author's advance in the form of hearing aids. But for 10-year-old Peter Augustine, a fourth-grader at Worthington Elementary School, the payment was appropriate. Peter has a moderate hearing loss that is corrected with hearing aids. His 26-page book, Wearing Hearing Aids, was published by Oticon, the Danish company that made his hearing aids. The book will be distributed to children receiving hearing aids, as well as to audiologists and doctors throughout the world.
NEWS
April 14, 1993
Telecommunications board to meetThe Governor's Advisory Board for Telecommunications Relay has scheduled a meeting for 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Maryland School for the Deaf, Route 108 at Old Montgomery Road.The Maryland Relay Service is a new program of the Department of General Services Telecommunications Access of Maryland, which oversees the provision of a telecommunications relay, permitting telephone communication between people, regardless of hearing or speech impairments.Interpreters are provided at these meetings along with audio acoustic loops for those who rely on hearing aids.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Millions of people with hearing loss are not using hearing aids, according to new research by Johns Hopkins scientists. Nearly 6.7 million Americans age 50 and older have hearing loss, but only  one in seven uses a hearing aid, according to the new research. The Hopkins researchers said it shows how under treated hearing loss is. It is the most expansive data analysis on the subject ever. “Understanding current rates of hearing loss treatment is important, as evidence is beginning to surface that hearing loss is associated with poorer cognitive functioning and the risk of dementia,” study senior investigator, otologist and epidemiologist Frank Lin said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
One in five Americans has significant hearing loss, far more than previously thought, according to new research that has scientists warning of an impending public health threat. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University say the growing number of seniors in the United States are at risk of isolation from their hearing loss and could suffer physical and mental debilitation. "People think hearing loss is an inconsequential part of getting older," said Dr. Frank Lin, an assistant professor in Hopkins' department of otolaryngology-head and neck, who led the study.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
Recently we attended a brilliant performance of Harold Pinter's "The Homecoming" at Center Stage . Unfortunately, the performance was marred by the audience's behavior. Mr. Pinter is famous for his "pregnant pauses" when nothing is said but everything is implied. Even though the Center Stage staff made the announcement to silence cell phones and other devices, a chorus of cell phones could be heard during the first act of the performance and during the all important pauses.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,sun reporter | June 28, 2007
OCEAN CITY -- Worried about the future of the resort's signature Boardwalk business - Trimper's Rides and Amusements - merchants here pleaded with Gov. Martin O'Malley yesterday for more state money to pay for marketing they hope will revitalize the town's image as a family vacation destination. Business leaders complained that the number of visitors to Ocean City has leveled off at about 8 million annually in recent years, a trend they fear could worsen without more money to keep pace with tourism rivals.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | February 1, 2007
The closer we get to Super Bowl Sunday, the more celebrities flock to the Miami area to enjoy the party scene and participate in a wide variety of corporate and NFL-sponsored events. Rocker Ozzy Osbourne, for instance, is scheduled to appear at an NFL charity event at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino today to distribute $1 million worth of hearing aids to needy kids. Yes, you heard that right - delicious irony fans - the former front man for Black Sabbath is going to be handing out hundreds of free hearing aids ... all these years after our parents warned us that listening to hard rock was going to damage our hearing.
NEWS
By Patrick Kampert and Patrick Kampert,Chicago Tribune | January 26, 2007
When people see the device on Jim Haniacek's ear, they correctly assume that it's connected to his cell phone. What they don't know is that it's connected to his hearing aids too. "It does look like a Bluetooth," said the 26-year-old private investigator from Chicago. "No one believes I have hearing aids." That he now has to convince people that he has hereditary hearing loss comes as a relief. He was concerned about the stigma of wearing hearing aids after he was diagnosed about a year ago. "I kind of saw it as a disability.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 5, 2013
Ravens Ray Lewis climbing Mount Kilimanjaro Retired Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis embarked Wednesday on a climb of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest point in Africa at an elevation of 19,340 feet. Lewis is joined on the trip by Doug Pitt , the brother of actor Brad Pitt and a goodwill ambassador in Tanzania, and retired Pro Bowl Chicago Bears defensive lineman Tommie Harris . Lewis is raising money and awareness about the need for clean water in East Africa. The climb is scheduled to continue through Monday.
NEWS
April 11, 2001
Live long, prosper: Variety of seminars set for 55+ Expo Seminars on a variety of health topics and estate planning are among the programs planned for the eighth annual 55+ Expo, to be held from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 22 in the Student Services Center at Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold. Exhibitor space at the expo -- sponsored by the Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce and the county Department of Aging -- is available. Anne Arundel Medical Center will present seminars called "Current Trends in Vascular Surgery" and "Diabetes `Get The Facts' - Your Questions Answered."
NEWS
By Regina Nuzzo and Regina Nuzzo,Los ANgeles Times | December 15, 2006
Jeanne Yeoman had been dealing with her hearing loss for a couple of decades, but listening still exhausted her. And technology wasn't really helping her patience. She remembers driving down the road one day and coming close to just hurling her hearing aids out the window. "Hearing aids made everything louder, not clearer," she says. "I didn't need amplification. I needed clarification." Yeoman wasn't deaf. So she was surprised to learn that she was an ideal candidate for an experimental type of cochlear implant.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
For most of his 20 years as a Montgomery County firefighter, Kurt Evers raced to emergencies in a torrent of noise from his truck's roaring diesel engine, blasting horn and wailing siren. By the time he retired this year on disability, he had lost more than a quarter of his hearing. The last straw came when he missed a turn on an emergency run - he didn't hear his officer's directions. Just 43, Evers wears a $5,700 pair of hearing aids. He works part time with his brother-in-law at a garage door company, but he misses his old job as a firefighter, "the only thing I really ever wanted to do."
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