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NEWS
August 27, 2008
On August 23, 2008 Jack Heaney, Friends and family may call on Wednesday from 4-8 P.M. at the Sterling-Ashton-Schwab-Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville, Inc., 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville. A Funeral Service will be on Thursday 9:30 A.M. at the funeral home. Interment will be in Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery, Owings Mills. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Monsignor Lyness Fund, c/o Amy Emmons, 2300 Dulaney Valley Road, Timonium, MD 21903.
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NEWS
August 27, 2008
On August 23, 2008 Jack Heaney, Friends and family may call on Wednesday from 4-8 P.M. at the Sterling-Ashton-Schwab-Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville, Inc., 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville. A Funeral Service will be on Thursday 9:30 A.M. at the funeral home. Interment will be in Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery, Owings Mills. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Monsignor Lyness Fund, c/o Amy Emmons, 2300 Dulaney Valley Road, Timonium, MD 21903.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 7, 2008
Dr. Joseph P. Heaney, a retired special education teacher and administrator whose career with Baltimore public schools spanned more than three decades, died of cancer May 30 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Windsor Mills resident was 59. Born and raised in Baltimore, Dr. Heaney was a 1967 graduate of St. Joseph High School in Irvington. He began his teaching career in city public schools after earning a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1971 from the University of Scranton. He later earned a state certificate in special education from Coppin State University and a master's degree in school psychology from Towson University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 7, 2008
Dr. Joseph P. Heaney, a retired special education teacher and administrator whose career with Baltimore public schools spanned more than three decades, died of cancer May 30 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Windsor Mills resident was 59. Born and raised in Baltimore, Dr. Heaney was a 1967 graduate of St. Joseph High School in Irvington. He began his teaching career in city public schools after earning a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1971 from the University of Scranton. He later earned a state certificate in special education from Coppin State University and a master's degree in school psychology from Towson University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 12, 2000
I have boiled my brain and distilled the residue trying futilely to remember how many of the 3,182 lines of "Beowulf" I read as a student. I am no scholar, so I know I could not have read it in the original Old English. Yet I vividly remember Beowulf, the Scandinavian prince and king; and I know that "Beowulf" was the earliest, greatest European narrative epic poem -- arguably the firmest foundation stone of poetry in English. Almost certainly, my awareness draws more on memory of popularizations than on reading the work.
NEWS
October 9, 1995
In awarding the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature to Seamus Heaney, the Swedish Academy acknowledged the importance of Ireland to English letters, but struck a blow for poetry.It is a small island of some 5 million souls, but this is Ireland's third Nobel Prize for Literature after the poet-playwright William Butler Yeats (1923) and the playwright Samuel Beckett (1969), the fourth if the playwright-essayist George Bernard Shaw (1925) is credited to the country of his birth. Ireland's contribution of talent that glorified the English more than the Irish language for centuries is immense.
NEWS
October 7, 1997
An article yesterday incorrectly identified Seamus Heaney, the Irish poet, as a winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Heaney won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/07/97
NEWS
September 9, 2003
On September 8, 2003 BERTHA (nee Lutins) wife of the late Charles Abel, mother of Ilene Heaney, Lynne Speigel and the late Rochelle Abel; survived by five grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Funeral services private.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
The principal of one of Baltimore's troubled middle schools sat next to his boss yesterday and told the state Board of Education that his school "is not in physical condition to open" next week.Joseph Heaney, who was appointed principal of Calverton Middle School on July 12, ruefully described physical problems at the West Baltimore school, including arson damage from last spring that has yet to be repaired.While he reported to the board, which has ordered the school to improve or face takeover, Patricia E. Newby, deputy superintendent, sat next to Mr. Heaney, nodding occasionally.
NEWS
April 11, 2004
On April 7, 2004 RONALD P.; beloved husband of Anne E. Hannon (nee Gardiner); devoted father of Mark J. Hannon and Kathleen P. Sauerhoff; loving son of Mary P. Heaney of New York; brother of Barry D. Heaney of Walden, NY; father-in-law of Elsie Hannon; grandfather of John Regan, III, Mark and Mitchell Belcher Family will receive friends at the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 3204 Mountain Rd. (Pasadena) Sunday and Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Requiem Mass in St. Hilary Roman Catholic Church, 3823 Second St., Brooklyn Park, MD on Tuesday at 9 A.M. Interment in GLen Haven Memorial Park.
SPORTS
January 23, 2005
Henson decides to call it quits Frail but smiling, New Mexico State coach Lou Henson pulled himself up from his wheelchair, his focus no longer on winning basketball games, but merely to walk again. Henson, who began his coaching career at Las Cruces (N.M.) High School in 1957, retired yesterday, 21 wins shy of becoming only the fifth coach in Division I history to win 800 games. The coach known for his "Lou Do" hairstyle, his sometimes fiery courtside manner and ability to consistently turn out winning teams found his ongoing health problems too tough an opponent.
NEWS
April 11, 2004
On April 7, 2004 RONALD P.; beloved husband of Anne E. Hannon (nee Gardiner); devoted father of Mark J. Hannon and Kathleen P. Sauerhoff; loving son of Mary P. Heaney of New York; brother of Barry D. Heaney of Walden, NY; father-in-law of Elsie Hannon; grandfather of John Regan, III, Mark and Mitchell Belcher Family will receive friends at the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 3204 Mountain Rd. (Pasadena) Sunday and Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Requiem Mass in St. Hilary Roman Catholic Church, 3823 Second St., Brooklyn Park, MD on Tuesday at 9 A.M. Interment in GLen Haven Memorial Park.
NEWS
September 9, 2003
On September 8, 2003 BERTHA (nee Lutins) wife of the late Charles Abel, mother of Ilene Heaney, Lynne Speigel and the late Rochelle Abel; survived by five grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Funeral services private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 12, 2000
I have boiled my brain and distilled the residue trying futilely to remember how many of the 3,182 lines of "Beowulf" I read as a student. I am no scholar, so I know I could not have read it in the original Old English. Yet I vividly remember Beowulf, the Scandinavian prince and king; and I know that "Beowulf" was the earliest, greatest European narrative epic poem -- arguably the firmest foundation stone of poetry in English. Almost certainly, my awareness draws more on memory of popularizations than on reading the work.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 1998
LONDON -- Ted Hughes was a poet with passion and a past. Blessed with talent and stalked by controversy, he illuminated an unforgiving natural world with his brawny prose.Yet his life, career and reputation were forever linked to his stormy marriage to his first wife, Sylvia Plath, the doomed poet turned feminist icon, who committed suicide.Even with yesterday's announcement that Hughes, 68, died Wednesday after an 18-month struggle with cancer, his admirers expressed concern that past tragedy would again overshadow the mountain of work created by Britain's Poet Laureate.
NEWS
October 7, 1997
An article yesterday incorrectly identified Seamus Heaney, the Irish poet, as a winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Heaney won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/07/97
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1993
Marianna Heaney is using food to help jog the memories of the geriatric residents of Cottage 11 at Crownsville Hospital Center.Every Thursday, the 75-year-old Annapolis woman carts her grocery bag in, passes out food and a recipe card to each of the 14 residents, and they all begin preparing their version of that week's dish. Tomorrow, for example, they'll be doing zucchini cakes.And the Crownsville staff says it's working.Robin Ramsay, activity therapist at Cottage 11, calls the program "one of the most successful activities the center has ever had."
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Despite the exposed insulation, despite the vodka bottles and glass strewn outside on the steps and in the grass, despite the broken hallway gates -- Calverton Middle School opened yesterday.What the school lacked in physical readiness, its staff tried to make up for with a pioneering spirit and warmth for the 1,270 students expected to arrive, new Principal Joseph Heaney said.Many who arrived immediately became lost. They didn't remember the instructions mailed home: Each grade level would enter the building from a different door and spend its day in separate wings of the sprawling building.
NEWS
October 9, 1995
In awarding the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature to Seamus Heaney, the Swedish Academy acknowledged the importance of Ireland to English letters, but struck a blow for poetry.It is a small island of some 5 million souls, but this is Ireland's third Nobel Prize for Literature after the poet-playwright William Butler Yeats (1923) and the playwright Samuel Beckett (1969), the fourth if the playwright-essayist George Bernard Shaw (1925) is credited to the country of his birth. Ireland's contribution of talent that glorified the English more than the Irish language for centuries is immense.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Despite the exposed insulation, despite the vodka bottles and glass strewn outside on the steps and in the grass, despite the broken hallway gates -- Calverton Middle School opened yesterday.What the school lacked in physical readiness, its staff tried to make up for with a pioneering spirit and warmth for the 1,270 students expected to arrive, new Principal Joseph Heaney said.Many who arrived immediately became lost. They didn't remember the instructions mailed home: Each grade level would enter the building from a different door and spend its day in separate wings of the sprawling building.
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