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By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 1998
Another magic bullet is headed for your supermarket.Recently, the Food and Drug Administration approved an additional label claim for foods that lower your cholesterol. Recently the FDA gave the go-ahead to oat products because so many studies have shown that if you eat your Cheerios or oatmeal regularly, as part of an overall healthy diet (low in fat, high in fiber, you know the drill), the soluble fiber they contain can play a part in further lowering your cholesterol.Now the FDA has reviewed the scientific evidence and concluded that psyllium, a type of ground seed husk, is even more powerful at lowering cholesterol.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 20, 2014
After several months of crippling snowstorms and flooding, I really look forward to spring weather, green grass, and flowers in bloom. The advent of spring is also a great opportunity to turn over a new leaf on our dietary and exercise habits. In fact, I've been told that hundreds of communities celebrate the advent of spring with something called the Great American Meatout. Local health advocates host educational events, where they ask visitors to get a fresh start this spring with a healthy diet of vegetables, fresh fruits, legumes, and whole grains.
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Letter to The Aegis | March 20, 2014
After several months of crippling snowstorms and flooding, I really look forward to spring weather, green grass, and flowers in bloom. The advent of spring is also a great opportunity to turn over a new leaf on our dietary and exercise habits. In fact, I've been told that hundreds of communities celebrate the advent of spring with something called the Great American Meatout. Local health advocates host educational events, where they ask visitors to get a fresh start this spring with a healthy diet of vegetables, fresh fruits, legumes, and whole grains.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
I would like to support the fight to save the Berger cookie ( "Don't take away my Berger cookies Nov. 29)! Why is the government trying to invade every aspect of our lives? Yes, people should eat a more healthy diet, but when were cookies ever healthy in the first place? Berger cookies are not responsible for the obesity problems or the cardiovascular problems in the country. People eating too much and not moving are the issues here. The government needs to allow good, hard-working people like the family that makes Berger cookies to earn an honest living!
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | October 5, 1993
Four out of five Americans recognize the importance of good nutrition. Yet only 39 percent say they're doing all they can to eat a healthy diet, and that number is down from 44 percent in 1991.This nutrition action "stall" is just one of the findings of the 1993 Survey of American Dietary Habits conducted for the American Dietetic Association and Kraft General Foods by the Wirthlin Group.Do we judge ourselves too harshly when it comes to evaluating our eating habits?For instance, you might think that chocolate is a "bad" food and you should never eat it. If you eat some anyway, you'd probably then say you're not doing "all you can" to choose a healthy diet.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 6, 2012
Drop a few pounds and it will lead to a good night's sleep, new Johns Hopkins research has found. As the body loses fat, particularly belly fat, people are able to sleep better, Hopkins doctors found when following 77 people over six months. The improvement in sleep quality was experienced by both those who lost weight through diet as well as those who combined a healthy diet with exercise. Study participants had type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes and were all overweight or obese.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2004
I've been shopping around for a diet plan. What should I look for in a plan that's healthy and actually works? To find a plan that doesn't harm, confuse or deprive you, keep these key points in mind. A healthy diet should: Be high in complex carbohydrates (including vegetables) and low in fat and sugar. Allow you to eat a variety of foods. Encourage regular exercise. A healthy diet plan should not: Promise weight loss of more than 2-3 pounds a week. Leave you feeling hungry. Claim a bottle of pills or magic cream will make you thin.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Over dinner the other day with a new acquaintance, the topic of food and ethics (and thus vegetarianism) came up. My new acquaintance, Mr. W., is about 60 pounds overweight and was enjoying an oversized cheeseburger on a white bun with a side of fries. He informed me, in all seriousness, that vegetarian diets are risky due to the likelihood of nutrient deficiency. Had Mr. W. read the recent article in The Sun ("Tips on switching to a vegan diet," Jan. 24), he may have cited it as evidence to support his claim.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
I decided to participate in the Food Stamp Challenge last week to confront Congress' recent benefit reduction, as highlighted in The Sun's recent editorial ("Hunger gets a boost," Oct. 29). As a social worker in D.C., I am acutely aware that food stamps may supplement income but do not provide sufficient benefits for an entire month. I have met only one recipient who was successfully able to stretch her food stamps each month. She was meticulous in what she bought, where she shopped and how often she went to food banks and churches.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
I would like to support the fight to save the Berger cookie ( "Don't take away my Berger cookies Nov. 29)! Why is the government trying to invade every aspect of our lives? Yes, people should eat a more healthy diet, but when were cookies ever healthy in the first place? Berger cookies are not responsible for the obesity problems or the cardiovascular problems in the country. People eating too much and not moving are the issues here. The government needs to allow good, hard-working people like the family that makes Berger cookies to earn an honest living!
NEWS
November 7, 2013
I decided to participate in the Food Stamp Challenge last week to confront Congress' recent benefit reduction, as highlighted in The Sun's recent editorial ("Hunger gets a boost," Oct. 29). As a social worker in D.C., I am acutely aware that food stamps may supplement income but do not provide sufficient benefits for an entire month. I have met only one recipient who was successfully able to stretch her food stamps each month. She was meticulous in what she bought, where she shopped and how often she went to food banks and churches.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Over dinner the other day with a new acquaintance, the topic of food and ethics (and thus vegetarianism) came up. My new acquaintance, Mr. W., is about 60 pounds overweight and was enjoying an oversized cheeseburger on a white bun with a side of fries. He informed me, in all seriousness, that vegetarian diets are risky due to the likelihood of nutrient deficiency. Had Mr. W. read the recent article in The Sun ("Tips on switching to a vegan diet," Jan. 24), he may have cited it as evidence to support his claim.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | January 15, 2013
How are those resolutions going? Same here. But there's help. January is packed with events designed to promote healthy-eating habits. Calories matter. Using our new online database of calories in restaurant menu items , you can now quickly check the calorie content of menu items from more than two dozen national restaurant chains, including Applebee's, McDonald's, Starbucks and Red Lobster. On Friday, Galen Sampson will present a workshop on healthy eating at Dogwood with Dr. Dana Simpler and nutrition consultant Karen Fick.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 6, 2012
Drop a few pounds and it will lead to a good night's sleep, new Johns Hopkins research has found. As the body loses fat, particularly belly fat, people are able to sleep better, Hopkins doctors found when following 77 people over six months. The improvement in sleep quality was experienced by both those who lost weight through diet as well as those who combined a healthy diet with exercise. Study participants had type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes and were all overweight or obese.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 9, 2012
As is the case in the rest of our great nation, the people of Harford County are getting greater, on average, with each passing day. Unfortunately, greater in this sense of the word isn't a good thing. We're not getting taller on average, but we are getting heavier, which, as the Harford County government has come to realize, means a disturbing percentage of our folks are classified as overweight or outright obese. Nearly two-thirds of us fall into the category of being overweight or obese, and, according to a health department study cited in a story published Friday in The Aegis , the problem starts when we're young and gets worse as we get older.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2004
I've been shopping around for a diet plan. What should I look for in a plan that's healthy and actually works? To find a plan that doesn't harm, confuse or deprive you, keep these key points in mind. A healthy diet should: Be high in complex carbohydrates (including vegetables) and low in fat and sugar. Allow you to eat a variety of foods. Encourage regular exercise. A healthy diet plan should not: Promise weight loss of more than 2-3 pounds a week. Leave you feeling hungry. Claim a bottle of pills or magic cream will make you thin.
NEWS
By Danica Coto and Danica Coto,Special to the Sun | November 4, 2001
Baby boomers may still be far away from creaky knees and daily pill popping, but for the millions of people who are entering their 50s, there's an easy way to live longer and qualify for those early bird specials. Go see a doctor. Hollie Solomon can attest to such a plan. The 62-year-old visits the doctor four times a year, following the recommendation that anyone older than 50 should be screened yearly to prevent certain health problems. Solomon started doing his annual screenings at 54, and has since followed a simple recipe for maintaining a healthy life: No drinking, no smoking and no more fried foods.
FEATURES
By Ellen O'Brien and Ellen O'Brien,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1993
Today, for a little "lite" relief, how about a tour of your refrigerator?Ah. There on the top shelf, there's a half-gallon of 1 percent milk. And what's that next to it? A jar of fat-free mayonnaise. And what can this be? Three chicken breasts, broiled in polyunsaturated fat, for chicken salad. And here's the tuna for tonight, canned in water.And this is . . . Hey. Wait a minute, back up a minute. Behind the pineapple. Can it be?Can it truly be -- liverwurst? Processed meat? And -- are we really seeing this?
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
Stick to the food pyramid. Eat a rainbow range of foods. Love thy garlic. Food scientists, holistic healers and practitioners of folk medicine may differ in their approach to sound nutrition. When it comes to staying healthy in flu season, though, they share a basic belief: Flu, a viral infection, cannot be prevented, but it may be discouraged by eating foods that enhance the immune system. The same holds true for that other viral scourge, the common cold. Whether or not you receive a flu shot this season, a healthy diet can only improve your chances of avoiding the nasty bug that causes discomfort at the very least and, in the most extreme cases, death.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
CHEVAK, Alaska - Even maps of Alaska often don't identify Kokechik Bay, a small inlet of the Bering Sea in the vast delta between the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers. No one lives there except for half a dozen contractors manning a Cold War-era radar site, still trained on the former Soviet Union. But the bay has always been life itself to a few thousand members of Alaska's native tribes in three nearby subsistence villages. "Our elders always used to tell us, in times of hardship, Kokechik Bay is the place you go, the place you can rely on even in bad times," recalls Richard Tuluq, tribal administrator of Chevak.
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