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NEWS
By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
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NEWS
By Marion Subah | August 19, 2014
Monrovia, Liberia - We sat in a waiting room of a health clinic here, talking about our fears. As a midwifery and nursing educator working in Liberia for Jhpiego, a Johns Hopkins University affiliate, I had been asked to help update health workers on the critical skills and interventions essential to managing Ebola cases. I was prepared to talk about the disease - what it is, how to care for patients and how to prevent it from spreading. But before I could do that, I knew we had to talk about how terrifying the job is. A nurse sitting across from me spoke candidly about his first experience with an Ebola patient - he didn't want to have any physical contact with the person, he was so terrified.
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HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Legislation aimed at reducing acts of violence against health-care workers is poised for final passage in Annapolis. Identical bills have passed the House and Senate that would require health-care facilities to conduct an annual risk assessment and document all violent workplace incidents. Annual training for staff and post-incident support for affected caregivers also would be mandated. One chamber must pass the other's bill for it to go to the governor's desk for signature. The legislation is the culmination of a push begun last year by workers seeking to reduce the number of assaults in Maryland hospitals and nursing homes.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
Anne Arundel County Department of Health workers inspected 134 food service establishments between Jan. 16 and Jan. 31 and found 21 critical food safety violations that were immediately corrected.They did not find violations at any of the establishments that would have warranted closing them.They found multiple violations at one place.Piezano Pizza and Restaurant, 2019 West St., Annapolis, was cited for cross-contaminating ready-to-serve foods and for not keeping food at its proper temperature.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- There is no medical or scientific justification for restricting the practice of AIDS-infected health care professionals, nor should they be forced to tell their patients that they carry the virus, the National Commission on AIDS said yesterday.The commission also opposed mandatory AIDS testing of health workers, urging instead that any such testing be voluntary.The best way to prevent transmission of the virus by health care workers was through strict adherence to normal infection control procedures, the commission said, adding that "no effort should be spared" to ensure that all health care professionals are trained in and apply so-called universal precautions.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1997
Nearly three weeks into the new academic year, six Howard County schools still do not have permanent health assistants, and at least three -- Forest Ridge and Bollman Bridge elementaries and the Applied Research Laboratory -- have just begun interviewing candidates for the positions, school officials said yesterday.In the interim, temporary health workers have been brought in, according to Patti Caplan, a school spokeswoman, who said no health emergencies had been reported.When schools opened Aug. 25, health assistants had not been hired at Bollman Bridge, Forest Ridge, Stephens Forest and Laurel Woods elementaries, Wilde Lake Middle and the Applied Research Laboratory (ARL)
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 2001
PINEVILLE, W.Va. - When the coal company doctors took down their shingles as the mining camps died off, the people of Appalachia settled in for long years of what they do well, stoic suffering amid the neighborliness of the hills as the level of health care spiraled toward the bottom nationally. "Coal-mining care they used to call it around here," said Angela Privett, as she presented her 11-year-old daughter, Kristen, who has cerebral palsy, to the ministrations of Hank Shrewsberry, a physician's assistant who represents the new order of Appalachian medicine.
NEWS
By Laurie Goodstein and Laurie Goodstein,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2000
ITHACA, N.Y. - It was nearly four years ago when the police climbed the creaky stairs to Deborah Stagg's apartment in response to calls from neighbors who had heard her screaming and raving alone in there. Stagg was known around town as a woman so disturbed she had once delivered her own baby by cutting her womb open with a penknife. This time, a steak knife in hand, Stagg bolted from her barricaded bathroom and stabbed Inspector Michael A. Padula in the neck, a fatal wound. The police opened fire, killing Stagg.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Donald Owen Fedder, a former pharmacy owner who later had a second career teaching and conducting research at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, died Saturday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. Dr. Fedder, who lived at The Towers of Harbor Court, was 83. "Don was a wonderful colleague and friend. He was thoughtful, insightful and always willing to share his views and advice. This has been a very difficult loss for the school," said Dr. Natalie D. Eddington, dean of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
HEALTH
March 24, 2014
Sen. Thomas M. "Mac" Middleton deserves a round of applause for calling attention to the plight of direct care workers serving those with developmental disabilities ( "Senator says he'll block minimum wage bill until state raises pay for caregivers," March 20). He has also long been a champion for direct care workers who serve children and adults with mental illness. Our workers are literally responsible for peoples' lives. They are the ones who ensure that the right medications are taken at the right times and are the first to notice changes in behavior or health status that may require quick intervention.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Legislation aimed at reducing acts of violence against health-care workers is poised for final passage in Annapolis. Identical bills have passed the House and Senate that would require health-care facilities to conduct an annual risk assessment and document all violent workplace incidents. Annual training for staff and post-incident support for affected caregivers also would be mandated. One chamber must pass the other's bill for it to go to the governor's desk for signature. The legislation is the culmination of a push begun last year by workers seeking to reduce the number of assaults in Maryland hospitals and nursing homes.
NEWS
By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
The Senate Finance Committee voted unanimously Thursday for a proposed law that would require state licensing of medical staffing companies after a radiographer was accused of exposing hundreds of Marylanders to hepatitis C. In a telephone call after the vote, Sen. Thomas Middleton, a Charles County Democrat, said that chances are high it will pass the full Senate as well, given the case of David Kwiatkowski, who allegedly stole syringes of drugs...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Legislation to strengthen violence prevention standards at health care facilities across the state has been withdrawn in the Senate - ending its chances for passage in Annapolis this session. Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, a Baltimore County Democrat and the bill's sponsor, said she submitted a withdrawal letter to the finance committee Monday after stakeholders representing nursing homes and assisted living facilities expressed concerns that it would not leave room for individualized approaches to dealing with violence in varying clinical environments.
NEWS
By Lynn R. Goldman and Michael J. Klag | January 7, 2013
The news that the Central Intelligence Agency had been running a fake vaccination program in Pakistan first surfaced in 2011 and quickly ignited fears that the covert operation could compromise the global campaign to eradicate polio. Late last month, a handful of vaccine workers, including a teenage girl, paid the price for the CIA's deceit: They were gunned down as they tried to give the polio vaccine to children living in the Pakistani city of Karachi and other areas. No one has taken responsibility for the attacks, although the Pakistani Taliban has threatened vaccine workers in the past.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Those looking to lose weight, quit smoking or keep tabs on a malady have a lot of choices in the smartphone app stores. Choosing one that's beneficial is more of a problem. Science is still trying to catch up to the market for mobile health applications, software that runs on mobile devices such as iPhones, Androids and tablets, which has produced tens of thousands of possible ways to achieve better health for free or a fee. One of the broadest efforts to assess "mHealth" strategies is being made by dozens of faculty, staff and students in multiple departments at the Johns Hopkins University, which has 49 official studies under way in Baltimore and around the world as part of its Global mHealth Initiative.
NEWS
By Lynn R. Goldman and Michael J. Klag | January 7, 2013
The news that the Central Intelligence Agency had been running a fake vaccination program in Pakistan first surfaced in 2011 and quickly ignited fears that the covert operation could compromise the global campaign to eradicate polio. Late last month, a handful of vaccine workers, including a teenage girl, paid the price for the CIA's deceit: They were gunned down as they tried to give the polio vaccine to children living in the Pakistani city of Karachi and other areas. No one has taken responsibility for the attacks, although the Pakistani Taliban has threatened vaccine workers in the past.
HEALTH
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Meagan Shipley, a nurse in the Baltimore City Health Department, works at a family planning clinic during the day and helps provide health care to workers on The Block in the evenings. When she was contacted by photographer Carolyn Jones to be part of a new coffee-table book, "The American Nurse," she agreed, hoping to publicize the work the city is doing to help workers in Baltimore's strip-club hub "A lot of people want to write off [Block workers]," she says. "I hate this attitude.
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