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NEWS
By Marilyn Lewis and Marilyn Lewis,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 6, 1991
The number of births in the United States increased so dramatically in the first seven months of 1990 that even scientists and social planners who expected an increase are being caught by surprise."
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NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
At 84, Barbara Talbert might seem an unlikely Washington lobbyist. But when she heard senior citizen programs could be cut to reduce federal budget deficits, she quickly got on a bus to Capitol Hill. "As far as Social Security is concerned, some people have that as their only income," the Bowie resident said, repeating the pitch she made to staff members in nine congressional offices in a single day. "Others with health problems depend solely on Medicare. " Dozens of Maryland businesses, nonprofit groups and, in some cases, individuals are lobbying the congressional "supercommittee" charged with finding a way to trim federal budget deficits by $1.2 trillion over the next decade.
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NEWS
June 22, 2003
Only three out of 10 adults are physically active on a regular basis. -- National Center for Health Statistics
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
In a bid to cut Baltimore's high infant death rate, a new public health campaign is hammering home a message to prevent more loss: Babies should sleep alone on their backs in a crib. Driving that message will be some poignant representatives: local mothers who have lost their children. Their faces will be on billboards and their voices will be in radio spots. There will be a video shown in maternity wards, some speaking and some door-knocking. Dearea Matthews, one of the mothers involved in the B'More for Healthy Babies project, hopes her personal loss will give her message real impact.
NEWS
February 22, 2001
In 1997, Maryland ranked 42nd among the 50 states in the percentage of births to teenage mothers. The national rate was 12.8 percent. State...Percent...Rank Mississippi...20.7...1 Arkansas...19.2...2 Louisiana...18.6...3 New Mexico...17.9...4 Alabama...17.6...5 Texas...16.1...10 District of Columbia...15.6...Not ranked Indiana...14.2...15 Delaware...13.4...19 Virginia...11.0...32 Pennsylvania...10.4...41 Maryland...10.3...42 Massachusetts...7.4...50 Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics
NEWS
By Dr. Michelle A. Gourdine | October 22, 2003
AFRICAN-AMERICAN health is at a crisis point. Tens of thousands of African-Americans die each year from health problems that could be prevented, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. For decades, blacks have fought for equality. Progress has been made in decreasing social, economic, educational and political disparities. Unfortunately, the same strides have not been made in health. Despite notable gains in the overall health status of Americans in this century, a significant public health problem still remains: the racial disparity in health status between blacks and whites.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | September 12, 1990
Washington THERE I WAS, feeling compulsion to join the journalism pack and write about the Bush-Gorbachev summit in Helsinki, when a little ''factoid'' crossed my television screen: ''Number of Births out of Wedlock up 50 Per Cent Since 1980.''I thought long and came to the realization that there was nothing that the Bush-Gorbachev meeting could do for America, or that Iraq could do to our country, that would be worse than what we have been doing to our children and ourselves.We have wallowed in bewilderment over a ''sexual revolution'' that has produced not only millions of ''illegitimate'' babies born unloved, under circumstances of present and future tragedy, but also an explosion of new sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS, herpes, chlamydia, not to mention explosions of out-of-style sexual curses such as gonorrhea and syphilis.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
A study of doctors and clinics that care for many Medicaid patients in Maryland has found that the lowest-cost providers are not necessarily the worst, nor are the most expensive the best.When it comes to the overall health of patients, researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and the state health department found that there was really no relationship between cost and quality of care.The findings suggest that policy-makers don't have to compromise care in their zeal to trim expenses -- as long as they monitor the work done by providers.
NEWS
October 28, 1994
Maybe girls are learning to say no. Maybe they are making better use of contraceptives. Whatever the reason, the results -- are encouraging. For the first time since 1986, birthrates among teen-age girls are heading down, not up. According to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), birthrates among 15- to 17-year-old girls fell by 2 percent in 1992. That drop comes after a 25 percent increase from 1986 to 1991, so rates are still high despite the slight decline.In recent years, prophets of social doom could reliably point to a steady rise in teen birthrates as one measure of the disintegration of traditional families and the values they represent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 7, 1992
When Lynn Steinhauer divorced a few years ago after more than two decades of marriage, she expected to feel lost and lonely. Instead, she delighted in the peaceful pleasures of an empty house and a table set for one.Now Ms. Steinhauer eats what she wants, comes and goes as she pleases and spends the money she earns without reproach. She flings herself into work with the energy once spent nurturing and negotiating. And she prefers a weekend relationship to a full-time mate.Ms. Steinhauer, 46, a social worker in Kalamazoo, Mich.
HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
Maryland's infant mortality rate dropped to its lowest point in 2009, according to preliminary statistics, but state public health officials say there is still need for improvement. The overall rate decreased to 7.2 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in Maryland last year, down from 8 in 2008 — a 10 percent decrease. The teen birth rate also decreased, from 2.8 births to women under 18 to 2.6, with declines recorded for black and white women. "We are so pleased this is showing positive progress," said Frances Phillips, Maryland's deputy secretary for public health.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
Americans may never agree on the abortion issue. But one thing remains clear: Fewer women are having them, a trend that has persisted through Democratic and Republican administrations, divisive election campaigns and the underlying culture wars. A report this month from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the trend in stark numbers: Between 1990 and 2004, the estimated abortion rate declined by 24 percent. In no single year did the rate even inch upward. "It's been dropping since the late '80s, especially for teenagers but for all age groups too," said Stephanie J. Ventura, head of the reproductive statistics branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
TRAVEL
By Jeanne B. Pinder and By Jeanne B. Pinder,New York Times News Service | June 5, 2005
So, you've done the hard part for your overseas vacation -- picked the destination and the date, coordinated family schedules, found airfares and booked hotels. Now all that's left is the children's passports. It should be straightforward, right? Well, steel yourself. Most people who are applying for a child's passport will find -- as I recently did -- that the process is more complicated than ever. Last year, the government started requiring that children appear in person when they apply for a passport and that the consent of both parents is documented.
NEWS
By Dr. Michelle A. Gourdine | October 22, 2003
AFRICAN-AMERICAN health is at a crisis point. Tens of thousands of African-Americans die each year from health problems that could be prevented, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. For decades, blacks have fought for equality. Progress has been made in decreasing social, economic, educational and political disparities. Unfortunately, the same strides have not been made in health. Despite notable gains in the overall health status of Americans in this century, a significant public health problem still remains: the racial disparity in health status between blacks and whites.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
Only three out of 10 adults are physically active on a regular basis. -- National Center for Health Statistics
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and By Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2002
Before having the surgery that would transform her more than 300-pound body, life for Shelly Bazensky had taken on the feel of slow torture. At the gym, people stared. Going to nightclubs meant dealing with men who would often laugh and yell out insults like "fatty." On airplanes and in movie theaters, it was humiliating trying to squeeze into seats too small for her. "I didn't want to go out," says the 35-year-old Pikesville resident, an administrative assistant who works in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
Americans may never agree on the abortion issue. But one thing remains clear: Fewer women are having them, a trend that has persisted through Democratic and Republican administrations, divisive election campaigns and the underlying culture wars. A report this month from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the trend in stark numbers: Between 1990 and 2004, the estimated abortion rate declined by 24 percent. In no single year did the rate even inch upward. "It's been dropping since the late '80s, especially for teenagers but for all age groups too," said Stephanie J. Ventura, head of the reproductive statistics branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
NEWS
November 8, 2001
Maryland ranks fourth in the nation in new AIDS cases, with 22.6 reported per 100,000 residents in 2000 (a total of 1,197 cases). The national rate is 12.8. North Dakota ranks last with 0.5 cases per 100,000 residents. New AIDS cases State per 100,000 residents Rank Florida 28.9 1 Delaware 25.4 2 New York 24.4 3 Maryland 22.6 4 New Jersey 18.9 5 South Carolina 18.8 6 Massachusetts 17.9 7 Connecticut 16.0 8 Louisiana 14.5 9 Mississippi 13.9 10 Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics
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