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By FROM SUN STAFF WRITER | August 2, 1997
A nonprofit group of Maryland health maintenance organizations has filed a lawsuit against the state commission that regulates hospital fees, contending that the commission has allowed hospitals to overcharge HMOs for services and that it violates state administrative procedure.The Maryland Association of Health Maintenance Organizations' (MAHMO) lawsuit against the Health Services Cost Review Commission, filed yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court, also charges that the commission violated the "due process rights" of HMOs by failing to adhere to established procedures in setting hospital rates.
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BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | January 17, 2012
Hospitals gouge employers and insurance companies. Combining into powerful alliances, they raise prices almost at will, forcing carriers to pass the costs on to patients and the companies they work for. Other hospitals operate on the edge of solvency and sometimes go bankrupt. Treating mainly the elderly and the indigent, they can't pay bills or attract top doctors with the meager reimbursement they get from government programs. Health care disappears from low-income neighborhoods or gets shifted to second-rate public hospitals.
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BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
Hospital rates in the state will outpace inflation, but not by as much as first planned.That was the decision yesterday by the state agency that sets hospital rates -- a move that may save Maryland consumers an estimated $25 million in health care charges this year.The Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission said the hospitals must forgo part of their automatic annual rate increase for new services and capital projects. Hospitals will be allowed to raise rates about 1.5 percent more than inflation instead of the slightly more than the 2 percent that the state's formula allows.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
State Health Secretary S. Anthony McCann joined other people who pay hospital bills yesterday in calling for Maryland's rate-setting commission to moderate the increase of hospital rates over the next three years. The state's Medicaid program for the poor, administered by McCann's department, picks up the tab for about 15 percent of hospital stays. McCann said too great an increase in hospital rates could push the state beyond federal spending limits for Medicaid. The state would lose the federal match for spending increases that exceed 7.1 percent per year per beneficiary.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
State Health Secretary S. Anthony McCann joined other people who pay hospital bills yesterday in calling for Maryland's rate-setting commission to moderate the increase of hospital rates over the next three years. The state's Medicaid program for the poor, administered by McCann's department, picks up the tab for about 15 percent of hospital stays. McCann said too great an increase in hospital rates could push the state beyond federal spending limits for Medicaid. The state would lose the federal match for spending increases that exceed 7.1 percent per year per beneficiary.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1996
Bon Secours Baltimore Health Corp. said yesterday that it will take over Liberty Health System, creating a larger institution officials say will compete better for business from health maintenance organizations.Making themselves attractive to HMOs is increasingly important because both West Baltimore institutions will be heavily affected by coming changes in the state's Medicaid program.Maryland health officials are preparing a plan to shift 210,000 Medicaid patients into managed care by July 1997.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
The cost of treating the uninsured at Maryland hospitals last year jumped by the largest amount in 12 years, prompting economists who run the state's hospital regulatory system to call for more affordable health insurance.But profits statewide jumped 85 percent last year after the system approved higher rates to pay for the expected increase in the number of people unable to pay for medical care.The bill for the uninsured -- $394 million -- grew 28 percent, according to figures released yesterday by the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets hospital rates in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said yesterday that he plans to convene a "legislative retreat" in the fall to consider health regulatory reform.In addition to being attended by key legislative leaders, he said, the meeting would include representatives from the state hospital association, the state medical society, the health maintenance organization industry and other interest groups.A Taylor-backed regulatory reform bill attracted wide support in the last legislative session but stalled at the end amid disputes over details.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1991
A coalition of labor and business groups today endorsed the idea of low-cost basic health insurance that would be exempt from the state's controversial mandated benefits.This position is a departure for the Maryland-D.C. AFL-CIO, the state's largest labor federation, which had fought for mandated benefits in the past.By state law, certain benefits are required in health insurance policies. These benefits include transplants, in vitro fertilization, mental-health care and substance-abuse treatment.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
John M. Colmers, chief administrator of Maryland's hospital rate-setting commission, was appointed yesterday acting executive director of the state's powerful new Health Care Access and Cost Commission.The move, announced by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, is designed to tap the expertise of an agency credited with leading the nation in controlling hospital costs.The appointment immediately got high marks from those who know or have worked with Mr. Colmers."I'm not sure they could have gotten a better person," said state Sen. Thomas P. O'Reilly, the Prince George's County Democrat who chairs the Senate Finance Committee, which helped draft the legislation creating the new commission.
NEWS
By William R. Brody | December 10, 2002
MARYLAND HAS been a pioneer in regulating hospital rates through a state agency known as the Health Services Cost Review Commission. Introduced in the 1970s when Maryland had among the highest hospital costs in the nation, the HSCRC was a vehicle to set rates for hospitals and to gradually ratchet down costs. As a result, the state's hospitals moved from among the most costly to among the most cost-effective in the nation. One of the unique, and I believe most important, features of the HSCRC is the "all payer" nature of the system.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
John M. Colmers, whose career covers much of the history of health regulation in Maryland, said yesterday that he will leave his job as executive director of the Maryland Health Care Commission at the end of next month to work for the Mil- bank Memorial Fund, a foundation that studies health policy. He has served as executive director of two other regulatory commissions and dealt with issues as varied as HMO "report cards," nurse shortages, health-record privacy, hospital rates, and small-employer insurance coverage.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
This could be the year Maryland gets tougher health regulation in an effort to keep costs down. Or less regulation, in an effort to keep costs down. Or the same regulation in a different package.Tougher regulation could come from the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets hospital rates. The commission has set a goal of bringing the cost of an average Maryland hospital stay -- now about 3 percent above the national average -- to 3 percent below the national average within three years.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
Once a month, people gather in a nondescript, state-issue conference room in Baltimore to discuss topics such as "the non-hospital-specific portion of the labor market adjuster" and "the 3 percent corridor for undercharges in ancillary services."Behind the jargon is a complex system that determines how much Marylanders pay for hospital care. Using sets of dense formulas, the Health Services Cost Review Commission sets how much each hospital can charge for each service.That system could be about to undergo its most serious changes since it was created 25 years ago. Some are likely in the next few months; more dramatic reforms are possible in perhaps a year.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said yesterday that he plans to convene a "legislative retreat" in the fall to consider health regulatory reform.In addition to being attended by key legislative leaders, he said, the meeting would include representatives from the state hospital association, the state medical society, the health maintenance organization industry and other interest groups.A Taylor-backed regulatory reform bill attracted wide support in the last legislative session but stalled at the end amid disputes over details.
BUSINESS
By FROM SUN STAFF WRITER | August 2, 1997
A nonprofit group of Maryland health maintenance organizations has filed a lawsuit against the state commission that regulates hospital fees, contending that the commission has allowed hospitals to overcharge HMOs for services and that it violates state administrative procedure.The Maryland Association of Health Maintenance Organizations' (MAHMO) lawsuit against the Health Services Cost Review Commission, filed yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court, also charges that the commission violated the "due process rights" of HMOs by failing to adhere to established procedures in setting hospital rates.
NEWS
By William R. Brody | December 10, 2002
MARYLAND HAS been a pioneer in regulating hospital rates through a state agency known as the Health Services Cost Review Commission. Introduced in the 1970s when Maryland had among the highest hospital costs in the nation, the HSCRC was a vehicle to set rates for hospitals and to gradually ratchet down costs. As a result, the state's hospitals moved from among the most costly to among the most cost-effective in the nation. One of the unique, and I believe most important, features of the HSCRC is the "all payer" nature of the system.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
John M. Colmers, whose career covers much of the history of health regulation in Maryland, said yesterday that he will leave his job as executive director of the Maryland Health Care Commission at the end of next month to work for the Mil- bank Memorial Fund, a foundation that studies health policy. He has served as executive director of two other regulatory commissions and dealt with issues as varied as HMO "report cards," nurse shortages, health-record privacy, hospital rates, and small-employer insurance coverage.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
Marylanders shelled out $14.3 billion for health care in 1995, an increase of 1.5 percent over the previous year, a state health cost monitoring panel reported yesterday.Last year, the Health Care Access and Cost Commission reported that health costs had increased 4.3 percent from 1992 to 1993.John M. Colmers, who is executive director of the commission, said the 1.5 percent increase represented "historically low levels."However, he said, there is evidence that "the cost problem is on a rebound," marked by increases in insurance premiums and a report by another state commission that hospital costs increased last year by 4.5 percent, about double the national rate.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1996
Bon Secours Baltimore Health Corp. said yesterday that it will take over Liberty Health System, creating a larger institution officials say will compete better for business from health maintenance organizations.Making themselves attractive to HMOs is increasingly important because both West Baltimore institutions will be heavily affected by coming changes in the state's Medicaid program.Maryland health officials are preparing a plan to shift 210,000 Medicaid patients into managed care by July 1997.
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