Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHealth Sciences
IN THE NEWS

Health Sciences

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 1998
The University of Maryland's $32 million Health Sciences and Human Services Library will be dedicated in a ceremony at 1: 30 p.m. today at the southwest corner of Lombard and Greene streets downtown.The event marks the grand opening of the 190,000-square-foot building, which ranks second in size only to Harvard University's among medical libraries on the East Coast.Tours will be given afterward.Pub Date: 9/17/98
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Claudine Snowden, a retired business school teacher and University of Maryland library worker, died of a respiratory ailment Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 92. Born Claudine Allen in Cocoa, Fla., she earned a bachelor's degree from North Carolina Central University, where she met her future husband, Arthur R. Snowden Sr., a photographer. She moved to Baltimore after her 1944 marriage and taught business English, typing and filing at the old Cortez Peters Business School on Eutaw Place.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 24, 1994
When regents at the University of Maryland selected a new president for its Baltimore campus, they left no doubt what they wanted to see happen at their professional schools campus. Dr. David J. Ramsay's mission, starting in June, is to boost research and entrepreneurial enterprises while ending internal factionalism at UMAB.Judging from his credentials and his accomplishments, Dr. Ramsay comes to this job prepared for the challenge. For over a decade he has been the No. 2 administrator at the University of California at San Franciso, a campus whose reputation as a top-notch public health-sciences institution has soared during that period.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
A decade ago, Taymour Tamaddon was an MBA. student with a background in physics trying to convince Baltimore-based money manager T. Rowe Price to hire him as an intern. Not only did Price give him the internship and hire him later as a health care analyst, but six months ago the company chose Tamaddon to head up the Health Sciences Fund, one of the firm's top-performing funds with $7.4 billion in assets. "It's overwhelming, as you can imagine. Exciting, challenging," he said.
NEWS
March 4, 1994
When it came time to select a permanent president for the University of Maryland at Baltimore, the board of regents this week turned to the West Coast and one of the top public universities for the health sciences, the University of California San Francisco. The regents plucked UCSF's No. 2 man, Dr. David J. Ramsay, as the person they want to heal internal rifts and enlarge the campus's research and its community-outreach efforts.UCSF's enormous success -- it has ranked No. 1, ahead of Johns Hopkins, in medical research dollars for 15 of the past 17 years -- is a worthy stimulus to UM's professional schools campus, especially with UMAB's stress on the health sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | December 10, 1998
Over the last two years, Baltimore photographer Patricia Lion Krongard traveled to England, Ireland, Scotland, Iceland, Australia, India, Thailand and Vietnam photographing children ages 6 to 18 and asking them questions about their outlook on the world. The result is the exhibit "Children of the World/The Worlds of Children," at the University of Maryland, Baltimore's new Health Sciences and Human Services Library.The show includes both Krongard's photographs and the children's responses to her questions.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | November 19, 1993
The design of a new library on the University of Maryland's downtown Baltimore campus was approved yesterday by Maryland's Architectural Review Board, with high praise.Members of the review panel said the $24 million library will be one of the most prominent and memorable buildings on a campus where nearly $1 billion worth of construction is under way or due to begin over the next decade."The form of the building is delightful," said panelist Alan Meyers. "And the internal stairway is going to be wonderful."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
After a flurry of construction in 1992, the University of Maryland at Baltimore is about to begin designing a $28 million health sciences library and information services complex.The library will occupy one of the most prominent development sites on campus -- the west side of Greene Street between Pratt and Lombard streets, next to the Student Union.The state Department of General Services recommended last week that the university hire a joint venture of the Columbia Design Collective of Columbia and Perry Dean Rogers & Partners of Boston to design the five-story, 166,000-square-foot library, which will be one of the largest in the state.
NEWS
March 7, 2008
Take a look at health sciences Howard Community College will host a program on careers in the health sciences from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday in the admissions and advising office (Room 242) of the Rouse Company Foundation Student Services Hall. Professionals representing dental hygiene, physician assisting and physical therapy will share information about their careers, and a representative of the University of Maryland will discuss entrance requirements for the School of Pharmacy. The program is free and open to the public.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
JUST AS construction crews finish work on one major academic building, the University of Maryland's downtown Baltimore campus is about to grow again.Administrators yesterday kicked off a week of festivities to mark the opening of the Health Sciences Facility, a $55.8 million research complex for the medical school and other departments.They expect to break ground by year's end for the Health Sciences Library and Information Services Building, a $24 million resource center at the southwest corner of Pratt and Greene streets.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, Yvonne Wenger and John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
Another man was shot in Baltimore early Monday morning, extending the Memorial Day weekend violence into the holiday and bringing the number of shootings to at least eight. An unidentified male was taken to an area hospital after being shot in the arm and stomach a few blocks from Lake Montebello, police said. Police have no motive or suspect information at this time, Det. Angela Carter-Watson said. The victim was discovered in the 1600 block of 32nd St. at approximately 3:27 a.m. At this time there is no update on the man's condition, she said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
The manager of one of T. Rowe Price's top funds and two analysts have resigned, effective Friday. Kris H. Jenner, 51, has managed the T. Rowe Price Health Sciences Fund since 2000. The fund, with $5 billion in assets, gained nearly 32 percent last year. Along with Jenner, analysts G. Mark Bussard and Graham M. McPhail also tendered their resignations. "They are leaving to pursue other opportunities," Price spokesman Brian Lewbart said. "They didn't share what they are. " According to Bloomberg News, Jenner wrote to some of his contacts to say the trio were leaving to form a new venture, although they couldn't disclose their plans yet, partly because of regulatory and reporting requirements.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Profectus BioSciences Inc., a Baltimore-based biotechnology company, said Wednesday that it won a $5.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support the development of a vaccine for a pair of contagious and deadly viruses that the U.S. government has classified as biological and agricultural threats. The viruses are found in other parts of the world. The viruses — Nipah and Hendra — are closely related and cause respiratory and encephalitic disease in humans and animals.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
St. Frances seniors Jordan Lewis, Carey Cheek and Harold Myles each scored three runs Monday evening to propel the Panthers to a 15-2, six-inning victory over Dunbar in a first-round President's Cup game at Mount St. Joseph. The result left both sides frustrated. St. Frances' players thought they could have done more, while Dunbar coach Travis Blackston felt his team could have played smarter. "We just made too many errors," Blackston said. "Six or seven of my players have been playing since Little League.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
The recession's effect on public policy produced a celebratory groundbreaking Monday for a new $49 million health sciences building at Howard Community College, two days after county teachers gathered to complain to legislators about proposed pension reductions and school budget cuts. The college's new 112,776-square-foot health sciences building has been in the works for years, and both county and state officials said they are glad that each branch of government still has enough capital budget money to push the project forward.
NEWS
March 7, 2008
Take a look at health sciences Howard Community College will host a program on careers in the health sciences from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday in the admissions and advising office (Room 242) of the Rouse Company Foundation Student Services Hall. Professionals representing dental hygiene, physician assisting and physical therapy will share information about their careers, and a representative of the University of Maryland will discuss entrance requirements for the School of Pharmacy. The program is free and open to the public.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
Faculty member Lyon is honored by HCC Sharon Lyon, associate professor of physical science at Howard Community College, has been named overall outstanding faculty member for 2005-2006. As part of the award, she will lead the faculty procession at the college's commencement ceremony, address student honorees at dean's list receptions and attend a major conference or other professional development activity. Also recognized by their peers as outstanding faculty members in their divisions were David Beaudoin and Jenny Male in arts and humanities; Rose Volynskiy and Mary Beth Furst in business and computer sciences; Anne McQueen in continuing education and workforce development; Linda Wiley and Rahim Salih in English and world languages; Jeanette Jeffrey and Kimberly Middleton in health sciences; Betty Anderson and Andy Bowie in mathematics; Bhuvana Chandran in science and technology; and Michael Heffren and Larry Fischer in social sciences.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Profectus BioSciences Inc., a Baltimore-based biotechnology company, said Wednesday that it won a $5.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support the development of a vaccine for a pair of contagious and deadly viruses that the U.S. government has classified as biological and agricultural threats. The viruses are found in other parts of the world. The viruses — Nipah and Hendra — are closely related and cause respiratory and encephalitic disease in humans and animals.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
Faculty member Lyon is honored by HCC Sharon Lyon, associate professor of physical science at Howard Community College, has been named overall outstanding faculty member for 2005-2006. As part of the award, she will lead the faculty procession at the college's commencement ceremony, address student honorees at dean's list receptions and attend a major conference or other professional development activity. Also recognized by their peers as outstanding faculty members in their divisions were David Beaudoin and Jenny Male in arts and humanities; Rose Volynskiy and Mary Beth Furst in business and computer sciences; Anne McQueen in continuing education and workforce development; Linda Wiley and Rahim Salih in English and world languages; Jeanette Jeffrey and Kimberly Middleton in health sciences; Betty Anderson and Andy Bowie in mathematics; Bhuvana Chandran in science and technology; and Michael Heffren and Larry Fischer in social sciences.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | December 20, 2005
The Baltimore school board approved last night applications for four charter schools - including the city's first charter high school - and rejected applications for five others. The vote does not necessarily mean that the four successful applicants will open next school year, only that they will now enter into negotiations over logistics with the school system. Charter schools are publicly funded schools that operate independently. Two of the applications approved propose converting existing schools, Rosemont Elementary and ConneXions Community Academy, to charter schools, while two involve the creation of new schools.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.