Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHealth Research
IN THE NEWS

Health Research

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Anna Tong and McClatchy Newspapers | November 23, 2009
The Internet's power to make something "go viral" has surpassed the phrase's original meaning. Sneeze once, you might pass a virus to the person next to you. Post something online, the entire world might get infected. Take the H1N1 vaccine: Late last month, the search term "H1N1 vaccine dangers" hit Google's top 10 searches. A video of a cheerleader supposedly crippled after getting the flu vaccine received almost a million hits. It's driving doctors crazy, as they insist the vaccine is safe and anti-vaccine preachers are plain wrong.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Michelle Minton's attack on my alcohol policy research ( "Are tax dollars paying for anti-alcohol advocacy?" July 30) exhibits a fundamental disagreement with public health research and practice. From immunizations to smoke-free workplaces to motor vehicle safety, public health aims at population-based changes to increase health and well-being. Over the last century, life expectancy in the United States has increased 30 years. No fewer than 25 of these years are credited to public health measures.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Leon E. Rosenberg | November 14, 1990
TWENTY-FIVE years ago, when I joined the faculty of the Yale University School of Medicine, I was full of well-founded optimism.Medicine.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
The Fort Detrick fire department has been named the best medium-sized department in the Army, base officials said Monday. The installation in Frederick hosts the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, the Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health research and other sensitive activities. In 2013, Fort Detrick Fire and Emergency Services responded to 1,560 calls on the base and in the Frederick and Silver Spring communities it also serves.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | August 10, 1993
Washington. -- A dispiriting nonchalance has so far characterized the Clinton administration's approach to health research and the government organization mainly responsible for its direction and finance, the National Institutes of Health (NIH).Money and people are the measure of interest in these matters. On both counts, the White House has so far been deficient, proposing spending cuts in some crucial fields of health research and only just now naming a replacement for the Bush-appointed director who left NIH at the end of June.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 11, 2012
Americans are paying a little more for health coverage this year. Premiums rose modestly for single and family employer-sponsored coverage, according to an annual survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust. The average annual premium in 2012 was $5,615 for single coverage, a 3 percent increase from 2011, while family coverage was $15,745, a 4 percent increase.   Companies continued to offer insurance despite the country's sluggish economic environment.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | November 24, 1992
Washington -- While Bill Clinton and his incoming crew are at it, they ought to take a close look at one of the least-scrutinized, taken-on-faith institutions on the federal landscape, the National Institutes of Health, manager and financier of the world's greatest health-research enterprise.With a budget of $10.3 billion this year, the NIH is far bigger than similar agencies in all other countries put together. Revered by Congress, which piles on money while rarely asking questions about results and priorities, the agency nearly tripled its budget during the otherwise lean years of the Reagan era. Under its hard-driving and ambitious director, Bernadine Healy, even greater expansion is planned.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | July 13, 1993
Personal computers -- or VDTs (video display terminals) -- have become so commonplace that it is estimated there are more than 30 million VDTs in use in the United States. The workplace has been transformed by this new technology, and much of the transformation involves women who work in front of terminals for hours each day.Women need to know what this enormous increase in working hours spent in front of VDTs means for their health.Q: Do computers (VDTs) pose a health risk for women?A: According to researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health's Center for VDT and Health Research, health concerns and VDT use have focused on two issues -- the first is in part a reaction to scientific research into the possible effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs)
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
The Fort Detrick fire department has been named the best medium-sized department in the Army, base officials said Monday. The installation in Frederick hosts the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, the Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health research and other sensitive activities. In 2013, Fort Detrick Fire and Emergency Services responded to 1,560 calls on the base and in the Frederick and Silver Spring communities it also serves.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Maryland again got a middle-of-the-pack ranking among states for the health of its residents, according to a report issued Tuesday from health research and advocacy groups that looked at a host of government measures and private data. Maryland was unmoved from last year's ranking at 21st by the United Health Foundation, the American Public Health Association and Partnership for Prevention. To make its ranking, report authors assess behaviors, public and health policies, community and environmental conditions and clinical care data.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 11, 2012
Americans are paying a little more for health coverage this year. Premiums rose modestly for single and family employer-sponsored coverage, according to an annual survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust. The average annual premium in 2012 was $5,615 for single coverage, a 3 percent increase from 2011, while family coverage was $15,745, a 4 percent increase.   Companies continued to offer insurance despite the country's sluggish economic environment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 17, 2011
Dr. Barbara Starfield, a professor and health services researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health whose work in the field of primary care and health policy brought her international acclaim, died June 10 while swimming at her home in Menlo Park, Calif. The former Mount Washington resident was 78. "She was found floating in the pool and may have died of an apparent heart attack. We are waiting for the autopsy report from the coroner," said her husband of 56 years, Dr. Neil A. Holtzman, a pediatrician and a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Maryland again got a middle-of-the-pack ranking among states for the health of its residents, according to a report issued Tuesday from health research and advocacy groups that looked at a host of government measures and private data. Maryland was unmoved from last year's ranking at 21st by the United Health Foundation, the American Public Health Association and Partnership for Prevention. To make its ranking, report authors assess behaviors, public and health policies, community and environmental conditions and clinical care data.
HEALTH
By Anna Tong and McClatchy Newspapers | November 23, 2009
The Internet's power to make something "go viral" has surpassed the phrase's original meaning. Sneeze once, you might pass a virus to the person next to you. Post something online, the entire world might get infected. Take the H1N1 vaccine: Late last month, the search term "H1N1 vaccine dangers" hit Google's top 10 searches. A video of a cheerleader supposedly crippled after getting the flu vaccine received almost a million hits. It's driving doctors crazy, as they insist the vaccine is safe and anti-vaccine preachers are plain wrong.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Hanah.cho@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
Like many cash-strapped small-business owners burdened by rising costs and fewer customers these days, Mark Derbyshire thinks a lot about health care. Specifically, how to keep paying for employee coverage that continues to skyrocket each year. So, Derbyshire made a tough decision this year to not offer family coverage to newly hired employees, while maintaining the current plan for his 30 employees at Park Moving and Storage in Aberdeen. As Congress works to fix the health care system, controlling the growing tab for medical insurance is an especially important concern for the nation's 6 million small businesses, whose support is crucial to any reform.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,sun reporter | December 20, 2007
Every couple fights, right? But in terms of their health, what they fight about is less important than how they fight, according to a Gaithersburg researcher. Elaine Eaker, an epidemiologist who operates her own consulting firm, looked at how 3,681 men and women sort out marital differences and tracked their mortality rates and cardiac health for 10 years. She found that women who had reported that they didn't vent during arguments were four times more likely to die than women who spoke up in a fight.
NEWS
September 18, 1990
Once every couple of years some prominent woman or other goes public about her breast cancer or cervical cancer, and there is a national surge of interest in women's health issues. But when such stories fade from the news, so does public attention.The neglect of women's health-care issues is a widespread and critical problem. A June report from the General Accounting Office pointed out that the National Institutes of Health has all but ignored a 1986 mandate to include women in health research.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.