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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and M. Dion Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2001
Under pressure from legislators and financially strapped health care providers, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is proposing to spend an additional $46 million next year on state health programs. In a budget sent to the General Assembly yesterday, the governor included $30 million for mental health providers, some of whom are facing bankruptcy because of late payments from the state. He also agreed to legislators' requests by providing partial funding for a program to offer state assistance to the elderly to purchase prescription drugs.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Maryland public health officials are putting caregivers - from Baltimore's major teaching hospitals to strip-mall urgent care centers to ambulances - on heightened alert for signs of Ebola as details emerge about missteps in Dallas, where a man with the deadly virus was initially sent home from a hospital. Health care providers have for months been preparing for Ebola's potential arrival in the U.S., and on Tuesday confirmed a Liberian man visiting family in Dallas had the virus.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House advisers are recommendin that President Clinton include benefits for at-home care for the disabled and elderly in his health-care overhaul plan, according to sources.With Mr. Clinton expected to make initial decisions on the plan later this week, advisers are pushing for a $15 billion-to-$20 billion program that would provide at-home care services, such as dressing and meal preparation.All disabled or elderly would be covered regardless of age or income, the sources said yesterday.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
It is during times of crisis that we see the very "best" in our fellow Americans. First responders and other heroic professionals routinely surprise us with tremendous and often unexpected acts. The University of Maryland Shore Regional Health System represents an often overlooked group of medical professionals who perform such acts every day. My father recently suffered a massive stroke and was admitted to Shore Regional Health's Easton facility. We do not yet know whether he will survive, but we are certain he could receive no finer care.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
NeighborWare has a new name, is getting a new home and is broadening its business.The company, now Health-Objects Corp., grew out of the NeighborCare Pharmacies chain's efforts to develop its own software. NeighborWare Health Systems was created last year by many of the NeighborCare principals to develop and market software oriented to pharmacies.NeighborCare was sold in June to Genesis Health Ventures of Kennett Square, Pa., and Steven G. Bass, who had been a NeighborCare executive, was named president and CEO of NeighborWare.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
The director of the state's Mental Hygiene Administration, Oscar L. Morgan, submitted his resignation this week and will leave at the end of the month, state health officials said last night. Morgan, 49, of Annapolis, was appointed director of the mental health agency - part of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene - in 1997, after three years as its deputy director. He was instrumental in implementing the state's public mental health system, run by Maryland Health Partners, a unit of Columbia-based Magellan Behavioral Health.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
ON THE SITE... Supreme Court upholds health care law's mandate : The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law Thursday, ruling that the government may impose tax penalties on people who do not have health insurance. And Baltimore's funniest celebrity is... :  In the end, Baltimore's Funniest Celebrity became more of an endurance test than a flexing of comedic muscle. Man shot in face and neck in Lauraville :  City police said robbery is the likely motive in a shooting early Thursday in the Lauraville neighborhood that has left a 25-year-old man hospitalized.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
Feeling the effects of the state's growing mental health crisis, Omni House - a provider of services to Anne Arundel County's poor mentally ill for 20 years - is struggling to remain open after closing two of its clinics. The Glen Burnie facility joins the list of community-based mental health providers across the state that are trying to cope with lack of funding and administrative problems in the state's public mental health system. Financial pressures forced Omni House to close its mental health clinic for children and adolescents two months ago, as well as its substance abuse clinic.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
A legislative joint committee approved rules yesterday for moving 330,000 medical assistance patients into managed-care plans, but it delayed the start of the program for 30 days in response to requests from health providers.The action by the Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review Committee means the program will begin Feb. 1, moving Medicaid patients into managed care within six months in an effort to save money and provide better-coordinated care.About a third of the patients are already in health maintenance organizations.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Nov. 21 was designated as Maryland Rural Health Day. We hope the public will join the Rural Maryland Council, the Maryland State Office of Rural Health and other stakeholders as we highlight health care in rural communities across the state. Rural Maryland is characterized by small, close-knit communities where citizens often know their health providers as friends and neighbors. Local physicians, nurses and other professionals work hard to provide excellent care. We celebrate and thank these individuals for their service to our communities.
HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Almost 30 years ago, Health Care for the Homeless was founded in Baltimore to help people "falling through the cracks" of the health care system; now the organization has created a program to ensure that people don't fall through the cracks of its own system. "We needed to make sure we were getting beyond these four walls," said the organization's CEO Kevin Lindamood, as he sat in the organization's clinic at 421 Fallsway. "To serve those that are so vulnerable they're not able to make it here.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Sitting front and center in the Arundel Center's County Council chambers, Camilla Shanley carefully refereed a debate over whether to bar cellphone towers at public schools. Playing the role of the council's chairwoman, the North County High School junior listened as fellow students playing the roles of politicians and government officials offered their opinions. After 30 minutes, Shanley called for a vote, and the decision was unanimous: All five "council members" voted against banning the towers at schools, saying the financial benefits outweighed possible health risks.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Nov. 21 was designated as Maryland Rural Health Day. We hope the public will join the Rural Maryland Council, the Maryland State Office of Rural Health and other stakeholders as we highlight health care in rural communities across the state. Rural Maryland is characterized by small, close-knit communities where citizens often know their health providers as friends and neighbors. Local physicians, nurses and other professionals work hard to provide excellent care. We celebrate and thank these individuals for their service to our communities.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore City officials are investigating a complaint filed Wednesday by two minority- and women-owned businesses against health care giant Aetna for not using their services despite a contractual agreement to do so. Thomas B. Corey, chief of Baltimore's Minority & Women's Business Opportunity Office, said he will research why Aetna did not use the subcontractors, CASI Inc. and JUL Enterprise, despite committing to when it applied for the city...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Health care now accounts for a bigger share of jobs than before the recession in all major metro areas, including Baltimore, the Brookings Institution said Monday. A report focused on health care employment shows the industry now plays a larger role in regional economies, with the number of health care jobs up nearly 23 percent to 14.5 million between the first quarter of 2003 and the first quarter of this year. During the same period, employment in other industries grew 2.1 percent, Brookings' MetroMonitor index showed.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
HIV/AIDS services The Department of Health offers free, confidential testing and counseling for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Call for an appointment at the Annapolis center 410-222-7493; Glen Burnie center 410-222-6636 or Parole 410-222-7248. Information: 410-222-7108. Men's health kits The Learn to Live program of the Department of Health offers free men's health kits with information on prostate health and colorectal cancer screening, as well as the HIM magazine, which includes information on sun safety, smoking, nutrition and other men's health tips.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
State Health Secretary Martin P. Wasserman yesterday unveiled the latest draft of regulations for the complicated task of moving 220,000 Medicaid recipients into managed care plans to somewhat skeptical members of the Senate Health Subcommittee.Wasserman said the revised draft was based on testimony by nearly 50 people and written comments from about 100 more in reaction to a draft released last month.The health department is "still on target" to begin the program Jan. 1 and to get all Medicaid recipients assigned to HMOs or similar managed care plans by the end of June.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1997
Armed with a federal advanced-technology award of nearly $2 million, Columbia's Sequoia Software is attempting to solve the vexing problem of creating a national "master patient index."The index would help a doctor treating a patient to find and read other records related to that patient, even if they are stored on the incompatible computer systems of a hospital, lab or another doctor.The 40-employee firm, which is No. 15 on the "Fast 50" list based on revenue growth among high-tech companies in Maryland, hopes to double in size by the end of next year, both with the patient index problem and to handle other growth.
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