Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHealth Program
IN THE NEWS

Health Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 1, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley is looking for ways to trim his workforce - not the number of people, but their waistlines. The administration has launched a wellness program aimed at state workers. The governor known for his statistical analysis of programs will also be tracking the workers' progress. The goals, officials say, revolve around promoting a healthy diet and exercise at work, making sure worker health insurance plans promote proven and cost-effective practices and smoking cessation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
When eight high school students are commissioned to make a graphic novel about sexual health, don't be surprised if the result includes pet dragons, a troll with genital warts and a guy named Funk Master Flexin'. These comedic touches appear in a booklet created during a six-week summer program for students at the Baltimore City Health Department that aims to raise awareness about sexual health and the department's relocated young adult center in Druid Hill. Meeting twice a week beginning July 8, the students were asked to write, photograph, draw, scan and digitally edit three stories about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control, and assemble them in a booklet.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Maryland's two largest public research universities launched a joint public health program Tuesday, the first of a series of planned collaborations designed to break down barriers between the two campuses. Officials say the joint program will enable students to draw upon the University of Maryland, College Park's expertise in subjects such as biostatistics and the social sciences while benefiting from opportunities for clinical research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Between the crises in the Middle East and Ukraine and the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, it's difficult to get domestic news on the front page this week, let alone good news. But the improved finances of Medicare deserve the public's attention, particularly given that the much-maligned Affordable Care Act is involved. Here's the bottom line: Medicare paid out less in hospital benefits last year than it did the year before. This is a fantastic development because, according to projections contained in an annual report released Monday, it means that Medicare will have enough money to continue paying for the hospital care of the elderly and disabled through 2030, which is four years longer than the federal government estimated for the program just last year.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1990
Reversing an earlier decision on one of the most controversial cuts to Maryland's deficit-threatened budget, Gov. William Donald Schaefer said today that he will restore about $6 million for continued payments for the state's kidney dialysis and pharmacy assistance programs.The governor's decision last month to cut state payments on dialysis treatment, a health service offered to nearly 4,200 Marylanders stricken with kidney disease, prompted emotional outcries across the state.At the time the cuts were announced, health officials said patients could find other ways to pay for treatment, particularly through private insurance or Medicaid, a health program for low-income earners.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | July 17, 2007
Maryland's lawmakers need to pay close attention to the state's dispute with the federal government over Medicaid. Maryland has been using a combination of state and federal Medicaid dollars to pay for a variety of services for children in special education. The federal government is now saying some of these payments were improper and wants its money back. This disagreement illustrates an often-overlooked fact about Medicaid: The federal government is looking for ways to reduce its Medicaid spending.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | October 7, 1993
Dundalk Community College will be receiving more than $300,000 over the next three years to increase services such as tutoring and financial aid to students in its pre-allied health program.The W. K. Kellogg Foundation's donation of $331,000 is the largest private foundation grant the college has received. It took two years to develop."We're very excited about it," said Bob Folkart, who managed the grant project and is chairman of the college's math, science and technology division."It's unusual for the Kellogg Foundation to award a grant like this to a community college."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
Since starting its health program five years ago, the Howard County Library has expanded from books and magazines to five health data bases that range from questions and answers on general medical advice to an electronic version of the Physician's Desk Reference.zTC "We're really attempting to provide information to people so they can deal with the information they're getting from their doctors," said Joyce Demmitt, head of Information Services at Howard County Library.Because they are updated regularly, the data bases have become more popular than books, librarians said.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
Concentra Medical Centers announced yesterday that it is buying most of the business health program of Mercy Medical Center, further consolidating its position as the largest occupational medicine provider in the Baltimore area.Financial terms were not disclosed.Mercy will continue its contract to provide occupational health services to the Baltimore police and fire departments. Concentra will serve Mercy's other clients, and will close small centers Mercy had in Towson and Brooklyn Park.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1994
The new director of mental health and addictions for Anne Arundel County's health department says he wants to reach out into the community to make sure residents are getting needed services."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
The Maryland health exchange has enrolled another 9,600 people in health insurance, according to the exchange's weekly report. The bulk, about 7,500, enrolled in Medicaid, the health program for the poor. Another 2,053 enrolled in private health plans during the week ending Feb. 8, bringing the total in private plans to 31,112. Maryland was one of 14 states that chose to runs its own exchange where the uninsured and underinsured could buy health insurance. The enrollment numbers are far below goals set for the exchange during open enrollment, which lasts through March 31. Exchange officials blame software glitches, as well as in-fighting among contractors, for the problems.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said Friday that Maryland should not switch to the federal government's health exchange despite technical problems with the state-run website where the uninsured can buy plans under the Affordable Care Act. "I think Maryland is really getting its act together and is on the right track," the Maryland Democrat said. "The federal exchange is a work in progress, so to move from one system that's had a creaky start to another system that's had a creaky start I don't think is advantageous to Maryland.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Maryland's Health Connection Executive Director Rebecca Pearce has done a mea culpa and rightfully resigned ("Health exchange director resigns," Dec. 6). Since Gov. Martin O'Malley put Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in charge of overseeing the implementation of the Maryland's exchange, what should Mr. Brown do now? The same as Ms. Pearce? The Sun's Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker write that Mr. Brown did not exchange any emails with those in charge of implementing the state's online health insurance marketplace, or if he did, the state refused to release them ("No emails from Brown on health exchange," Dec. 7)
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Anne Arundel County Councilman John Grasso was elected chairman of the council Monday night. Grasso, a Glen Burnie Republican, will lead council meetings for the next year. In Anne Arundel, the chairman generally is a member of the majority party and traditionally rotates among members of the party. The Anne Arundel County Council has four Republican and three Democrats. All seven seats will be up for election in 2014. Grasso, who is often outspoken about issues important to him, takes over from Councilman Jerry Walker, a Gambrills Republican who led the council for the past year.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 24, 2013
The Harford County Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People will host a countywide Affordable Care Act health forum on Saturday, Nov. 2, from 2-4 p.m. at Union United Methodist Church, 700 N. Post Road in Aberdeen. The NAACP said it hopes to reach out to approximately 20,000 uninsured Harford County residents under the age of 65 who do not have health insurance. Guest speakers will include: • Marilyn Johnson, Harford County's lead navigator from the Maryland Health Connection, http://www.marylandhealthconnection.gov •Representatives from SEEDCO, a partner for Maryland's Health Benefit Exchange that manages health insurance access programs in the region; • Representatives from the Harford Community Action Agency, Inc. and the Harford County Health Department; • Cheri Wilson from the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Single individuals, those already covered through Medicaid, a families and small business owners are urged to attend.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center said Friday that it has received a new Medicare provider agreement, allowing it to again seek reimbursement for treating patients on the federal government's health program. The Towson hospital has not billed Medicare patients since the University of Maryland Medical System voluntarily declined to keep St. Joseph's prior federal certification when it bought the hospital Dec. 1. St. Joseph officials now hope to recoup some of those losses.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2003
Children's advocates are stepping up their efforts to reverse $2.4 million in state budget cuts to a pediatric health care program, arguing that more Maryland children will fall into the ranks of the uninsured. Because of the cuts, enrollment in the Maryland Children's Health Program may be down for the first time since its inception in 1998, according to the Maryland Budget and Tax Policy Institute, a research group in Silver Spring, which warns that visits to hospital emergency rooms by uninsured children could push up health costs for other residents.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center loses about $400,000 every day it's not certified by Medicare to collect payments from the federal health care program. The big question is how much that will ultimately cost the Towson hospital. Tens of millions of dollars could be at stake. The University of Maryland Medical System voluntary gave up the Medicare certification when it bought St. Joseph from Denver-based Catholic Health Initiatives in a $206.3 million deal that closed in December.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center loses about $400,000 every day it's not certified by Medicare to collect payments from the federal health care program. The big question is how much that will ultimately cost the Towson hospital. Tens of millions of dollars could be at stake. The University of Maryland Medical System voluntary gave up the Medicare certification when it bought St. Joseph from Denver-based Catholic Health Initiatives in a $206.3 million deal that closed in December.
EXPLORE
January 28, 2013
Better background checks and mental health programs critical for gun control There is no argument that America has a gun problem. No matter how many studies, statistics or mass killings, there will always be individuals who find comfort and even patriotism in owning guns. Most have a primitive, juvenile, single-minded interpretation of the Second Amendment which, through many years of effort, a pro-gun lobby has managed to amend by simply never mentioning the preamble.   We have allowed this interpretation to flourish and now find ourselves with millions of humans with millions of guns, slowly killing ourselves without any constitutional constraint.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.