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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
Taylor DesRosiers was a competitive swimmer throughout her life, always fit. But in her first year of medical school, she realized that had changed — she was at an unhealthy weight. The rigors of her education had piled on top of two rough years in which she went through a broken-off engagement and supporting her mother through a health scare. During a course on obesity, she realized, according to body mass index charts, she was technically obese herself. "It just kind of hit me: I need to make a large change," DesRosiers said.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014
While much of the response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is contingent on the United States government's public health and military actions ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2), health professionals and government officials have been quite reluctant to come to terms with how America's history of public health espionage and medical mistreatment complicate the battle against Ebola. America has a long history of medical mistreatment and imperialism which are now providing the fuel for Ebola conspiracy beliefs.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
The federal government helped put Christopher Vogelmann through chiropractic school in the mid-1980s, but a decade after graduating, the Rockville doctor owes more than $95,000.Vogelmann is among more than 1,400 doctors and other health professionals -- including 29 from Maryland -- whom the Department of Health and Human Services hopes to shame into paying back their federally guaranteed health education loans. This week the names were posted on the Internet.As a group, the defaulters owe more than $107 million -- an average of $76,000 per person, including penalties.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
NEWS
October 19, 2004
The Howard County Library will hold a free open house to introduce its Health Information Center to health professionals from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. tomorrow at the central library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. In June, the library announced the formation of a Cancer Information Collection at the central library, giving county residents access to a centrally located comprehensive collection of the best available lay resources on cancer care and prevention. The library has plans to broaden that collection to include information about other health care issues.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman, Head of Maryland News | June 22, 2012
The Baltimore Sun is launching several new features that will augment our regional coverage and appear online and in Sunday print editions. New medical/science coverage will highlight research being done in Baltimore, news on critical health and scientific institutions in the area, and health professionals on the move in our community. The Federal Workplace will cover the region's large community of federal workers and the issues and trends affecting them.
NEWS
By Dana Silver | August 20, 2013
For the past 21 years, the first week in August has been known as World Breastfeeding Week. Maryland, recognizing the importance of breast-feeding for both personal and public health, has annually expanded this to declare August Maryland Breastfeeding Month. Breast-feeding rates have increased significantly across the country over the last four decades, following many years of promotion of formula by both health professionals and formula companies. In 1976, only 36 percent of moms initiated breast-feeding, and only 14 percent were still breast-feeding at 6 months.
NEWS
By MICHAEL E. JOHNS | November 24, 1993
Most of the reaction to the Clinton administration's proposal to reform our health-care system has centered on its costs. These will be substantial and will require continuing assessment. But equal attention must be paid to the foundation of our health-care system -- its quality.Increasingly, health-care services are described as commodities, and health-care workers are described as cost centers to be managed, rather than as highly skilled people to be supported in their devotion to disease prevention and to the care and comfort of the sick.
NEWS
January 17, 2010
I applaud the attention that Dr. Michael Johns and Dr. Edward Miller are bringing to the health care work force challenges as health care reform legislation draws closer to passage ("Prescription: more doctors," Jan. 1). I share their concerns about shortages of health professionals and have worked hard to include provisions in the House health care bill that will help alleviate these problems. If we are to successfully reform our health care system, we must create a fiscally sustainable, integrated workforce that will take into account national trends, as well as state or regional factors.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Health officials predicted yesterday that hospitals would take more stringent action to ensure that health practitioners infected with the AIDS virus do not perform invasive procedures.Their predictions were prompted by the Senate's overwhelming approval on Thursday of two tough measures intended to prevent health professionals from infecting patients with the AIDS virus.The officials interpreted the Senate votes as expressions of a growing public fear that health practitioners could infect patients, although this is known to have occurred in only five of the 182,000 cases of AIDS reported since the disease was first recognized in 1981.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Dr. Adam Kushner agreed to go to Syria last month to help in any way he was needed. And when the Baltimore surgeon got there, the work was waiting for him. In the hours before he arrived at a small hospital in the northern province of Aleppo, a nearby village had been attacked. He walked in to find rows of wounded, his new colleagues already at work stabilizing and treating them. "It was in the middle of a mass casualty," said Kushner, who visited Syria last month with the group Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
By Dana Silver | August 20, 2013
For the past 21 years, the first week in August has been known as World Breastfeeding Week. Maryland, recognizing the importance of breast-feeding for both personal and public health, has annually expanded this to declare August Maryland Breastfeeding Month. Breast-feeding rates have increased significantly across the country over the last four decades, following many years of promotion of formula by both health professionals and formula companies. In 1976, only 36 percent of moms initiated breast-feeding, and only 14 percent were still breast-feeding at 6 months.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Informational articles on Blood clots and hernias were two of the most-sought baltimoresun.com health posts in the first half of 2013. The five "most popular story" slots for health were rounded out by three articles involving Johns Hopkins, according to metrics provider Adobe SiteCatalyst. Of those, two involved Dr. Benjamin Carson, who courted political attention this spring by criticizing Barack Obama's policies in a speech that the president viewed as an audience member. A collection of pictures related to Carson also made the list of the top photo galleries for the six-month period.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
As a longtime supporter of Planned Parenthood, I wholeheartedly disagree with letter writer Gary Gamber's view ("Shut Planned Parenthood," May 31). At this time in our community when health care facilities are shutting their doors, it is more important than ever to keep the doors to Planned Parenthood of Maryland open. Over 185,000 Maryland women are without health insurance. For many of these women and for their families, Planned Parenthood is the one health care provider they see a year.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
Taylor DesRosiers was a competitive swimmer throughout her life, always fit. But in her first year of medical school, she realized that had changed — she was at an unhealthy weight. The rigors of her education had piled on top of two rough years in which she went through a broken-off engagement and supporting her mother through a health scare. During a course on obesity, she realized, according to body mass index charts, she was technically obese herself. "It just kind of hit me: I need to make a large change," DesRosiers said.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
The Maryland Board of Physicians should have its duties and powers more explicitly outlined by the General Assembly, and be split into two panels that can independently perform investigatory and disciplinary operations, according to an official review released Wednesday. It should also "finalize and implement sanctioning guidelines for physicians and allied health professionals as soon as possible," the review said, and work to create additional, "informal processes for case resolution.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
The Maryland Poison Control Center is the difference between life or death for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of people. As such, it is too vital to become a bureaucratic football to be kicked around between state agencies.For many years the center, which advises health professionals about treatment for poisons around the clock, has been part of the University of Maryland at Baltimore. Faced with budget stringency and inadequate funding, the university wants to shift the program elsewhere. The state health department, with the ++ same budget problems, is ducking.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman, Head of Maryland News | June 22, 2012
The Baltimore Sun is launching several new features that will augment our regional coverage and appear online and in Sunday print editions. New medical/science coverage will highlight research being done in Baltimore, news on critical health and scientific institutions in the area, and health professionals on the move in our community. The Federal Workplace will cover the region's large community of federal workers and the issues and trends affecting them.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | September 6, 2011
Much of the challenge of avoiding unnecessary medical bills or contesting possible errors stems from the lack of transparency. In most cases, patients rely on the expertise of medical professionals and the staff in their offices to schedule appointments and have no way to compare whether what they're being charged is appropriate. But Eileen's column extolling the assistance of the Health Education and Advocacy Unit of the Maryland Attorney General's office includes two excellent tips that can help you avoid unnecessary bills down the line.
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