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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 17, 2011
Dr. Barbara Starfield, a professor and health services researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health whose work in the field of primary care and health policy brought her international acclaim, died June 10 while swimming at her home in Menlo Park, Calif. The former Mount Washington resident was 78. "She was found floating in the pool and may have died of an apparent heart attack. We are waiting for the autopsy report from the coroner," said her husband of 56 years, Dr. Neil A. Holtzman, a pediatrician and a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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NEWS
By Batimore Sun Media Group staff | October 8, 2014
The Baltimore Sun canvassed readers, sources and leaders to determine the area's most intriguing movers and shakers of 2014. Here's our list: Keshia M. Pollack 35, associate professor of health and policy and management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Keshia Pollack spends a lot of time thinking about kids walking to school on Baltimore streets, service members riding in Humvees on the battlefield and Major League...
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After much criticism of the secrecy surrounding the work of his health policy team, President Clinton abandoned yesterday his effort to conceal the names of more than 500 people who are developing his proposal to guarantee health insurance coverage for all Americans.With the identities of many of those people having already circulated around Washington, the White House acknowledged that its attempt to keep secret the identities had failed. It reluctantly issued a listing of all 511 staff members of the health-care task force.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Three years after touting his medical background as he campaigned for Congress, Rep. Andy Harris is emerging as a top spokesman in opposition to Obamacare - and taking on other health policy issues as well. For Harris, a Baltimore County anesthesiologist who occasionally wore scrubs as he ran for office in 2010, the troubled rollout of the health care law is providing a platform just as he has expanded his reach on other medical issues - from human cloning to organ transplants for HIV patients.
NEWS
By New York Times | August 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The National Governors Association has drafted a new policy statement saying that health care should be available to all Americans within 10 years and that the federal government should eventually take over all the costs of long-term care now borne by the states.The statement was developed by a bipartisan group of 15 governors in advance of the organization's semiannual meeting, which begins Saturday in Seattle.The governors' pronouncements on health policy are significant because the Bush administration has said it would be guided by them in developing national health policy proposals.
TRAVEL
By Shelby Gilje and Shelby Gilje,seattle times | April 30, 2000
Which makes sense to you -- spending $300 for travel health insurance before a trip or $30,000 in medical expenses afterward? Travel insurance is an area many neglect when planning vacations because they don't know their health insurance has limitations. Travelers should not assume that their regular health-insurance policies will cover illnesses or medical emergencies anywhere they go -- be it in the United States or in foreign countries. Knowing whether your health-insurance policy offers any kind of travel benefits could be critical.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
Top-ranking Democrats in the House of Delegates are offering lobbyists and others a briefing on health policy issues for the price of a $150 campaign contribution.Del. Howard P. Rawlings, chairman of the Appropriations Committee, sent out invitations this week to the "1998 Health Policy Leadership Forum and Fund-raising Reception." The invitations went to, among others, lobbyists who represent clients in the health care field.The forum will feature a panel made up of four House committee or subcommittee chairmen who deal with health-related legislation.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
As a pediatrician-in-training at Boston Medical Center in 1997, Joshua Sharfstein stood out among the other aspiring doctors by making house calls in poor neighborhoods. What Sharfstein discovered on those in-home visits led him to co-write a report showing that deplorable housing conditions can severely harm the health of children. The study, which Sharfstein undertook at age 28, grabbed national attention, garnered praise from the federal government's top housing official, and confirmed expectations set by an award that identified him as a potential public health leader while he was a Harvard Medical School student.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 13, 2013
Aaron Rabinowitz has joined the two hospital health system in Harford County as Vice President, General Counsel, Upper Chesapeake Health announced. Prior to joining UCH, Rabinowitz practiced as a health attorney at the Baltimore law firm of Ober Kaler, where he counseled hospitals and health systems on regulatory, compliance and reimbursement issues. He previously worked as a research fellow on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and as an antitrust economic consultant at CRA International in Washington, D.C. He earned an undergraduate degree in economics from Haverford College, a master¹s degree in economics from the National University of Ireland, Galway, a PhD in health policy from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | March 12, 2009
The White House reportedly has tapped Baltimore health commissioner Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein to be deputy commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. The Harvard-educated pediatrician would serve under Dr. Margaret A. "Peggy" Hamburg, the former New York City health chief who is to be nominated FDA commissioner, according to reports in The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Sharfstein, the White House and the FDA all declined to comment. Sharfstein told The Baltimore Sun in December that he loved his job and was "looking forward to another year of public health progress in the city."
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 13, 2013
Aaron Rabinowitz has joined the two hospital health system in Harford County as Vice President, General Counsel, Upper Chesapeake Health announced. Prior to joining UCH, Rabinowitz practiced as a health attorney at the Baltimore law firm of Ober Kaler, where he counseled hospitals and health systems on regulatory, compliance and reimbursement issues. He previously worked as a research fellow on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and as an antitrust economic consultant at CRA International in Washington, D.C. He earned an undergraduate degree in economics from Haverford College, a master¹s degree in economics from the National University of Ireland, Galway, a PhD in health policy from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.
NEWS
By Fred Weimert | August 29, 2012
Another cigarette tax proposal is coming our way - and I'm all for it. As a father, a clergyman and a member of the community, I wholeheartedly support the new Healthy Maryland Initiative proposal to discourage tobacco use through cigarette tax increases. It's good economic and health policy, and on a personal level, I believe such taxes have helped save two of my children's lives. I'm grateful. The measure is straightforward: one more dollar on each pack of cigarettes sold in Maryland, with revenues going to smoking cessation and health care.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
Dan Rodricks wrote in a recent column that Howard County Health Officer Peter Beilenson is "sick of the vilification of the uninsured by opponents of Obamacare. " And that he is "sick of people like Rush Limbaugh, who have great health insurance, complaining that people who don't have insurance are just a bunch of freeloaders. It's obvious that neither Mr. Rodricks nor Mr. Beilenson has ever listened to Rush's radio program or they would know that Rush doesn't have insurance.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 31, 2012
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg proposed this week a first-of-its-kind ban on the sale of large-sized sodas and other sugary beverages at restaurants and other outlets, but don't look to Baltimore to immediately follow suit. Though studies say such restrictions, as well as higher prices and education, can curb consumption, some local leaders plan to let New York be the test lab for now. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakewill remain focused on a controversial plan to increase the tax from 2 to 5 cents on sugary drinks and alcohol.
NEWS
By Fredric Rolando | August 10, 2011
Few institutions touch more Americans than the U.S. Postal Service, whose role is spelled out in the Constitution and which delivers to 150 million homes and businesses six days a week. Letter carriers get to know our communities, occasionally saving elderly residents who are ill, finding lost children and stopping crime. We annually conduct the nation's largest single-day food drive, replenishing food pantries in Baltimore and elsewhere. And yet, the misinformation circulating about the Postal Service is startling, such as the notion that in delivering the mail, the USPS has a massive imbalance between revenues and expenses.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 17, 2011
Dr. Barbara Starfield, a professor and health services researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health whose work in the field of primary care and health policy brought her international acclaim, died June 10 while swimming at her home in Menlo Park, Calif. The former Mount Washington resident was 78. "She was found floating in the pool and may have died of an apparent heart attack. We are waiting for the autopsy report from the coroner," said her husband of 56 years, Dr. Neil A. Holtzman, a pediatrician and a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
August 10, 1997
Managed care official named at Carroll hospitalDavid Horn has been appointed vice president of marketing, business development and managed care at Carroll County General Hospital.Horn comes to Carroll from Children's Health System in Norfolk, Va. He also has been a medical administrator in the Navy.He holds a bachelor's degree in health and business administration from the University of Cincinnati and a master's degree in health policy and administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
HEALTH
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Uninsured, low-income Maryland residents may soon be able to use a Web-based computer program to find out which health programs they are eligible for and apply to them all at once, under a state program being tried out by Howard County health officials. Howard used a state grant to buy the half-million-dollar software about two years ago, but has now modified it to both instantly determine a person's eligibility and allow application to several programs — without having to repeat the same personal information on multiple applications to various state and federal agencies.
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