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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
After spending several hours over two days to enroll in an insurance plan through the glitch-prone Maryland health exchange, it took another two days to cancel the policy. Agents at the CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield call center have been inundated with calls from people having trouble buying a new policy through the exchange. Maybe that's why they had little time to get me out of mine. (The insurance would have cost me more out-of-pocket than the insurance provided by my employer.)
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Maryland's health exchange reported Friday a decline in the number of people who were covered by private plans through the online insurance portal created by the Affordable Care Act. But the total number of people obtaining coverage through the exchange still grew to 433,947 because of people signing up for Medicaid. About 264 people canceled their private plans in the last month because of special circumstances and a total of 78,666 are now covered through those plans. The state exchange also lost Medicaid recipients who no longer qualified for the program, but gained more than it lost.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's plan to provide tax credits of up to $3,750 to help needy families buy medical insurance, the only tangible element announced so far in his long-awaited health care reform package, drew mixed reactions as the administration continued thrashing out the rest of the president's overall reform plan.Deferring to Mr. Bush, who is expected to unveil the full package early next month, administration officials steadfastly refused to provide any details of how the tax credit system would work.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland health exchange officials plan to contact every person who bought one of their insurance plans last year to get them to re-enroll in November. Most of the nearly 79,000 people who gained private coverage in the state under the Affordable Care Act were subsidized, and they will lose that benefit if they don't sign back up manually. Most people who do nothing will be automatically re-enrolled in the same or equivalent plans, according to Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, state health secretary and chairman of the exchange board.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The agency that oversees the state's health plan for those uninsured because of preexisting conditions, paid a vendor nearly $367,000 for information technology services without proving that the contract was chosen through a competitive bidding process, a legislative audit has found. The audit also said The Maryland Health Insurance Plan did not perform routine reviews to make sure the insurer that manages the plan for the state, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, was complying with its contract.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Do you have questions about how President Clinton's health reform program will affect you? Call Sundial, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information service, at (410) 783-1800 (268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, punch in the four-digit code 4425 on your touch-tone phone.We'll answer the most interesting questions in this space. Because of the volume of calls, we regret that we cannot answer every question. Keep in mind that details of the Clinton plan are likely to change as Congress works on the proposal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- From the first weeks of the Clinton administration, Treasury Department officials expressed profound doubts about major parts of the president's plan to overhaul the nation's health care system, White House records made public yesterday show.The administration released 234 boxes of working papers of Hillary Rodham Clinton's Task Force on National Health Care Reform, after fighting for 18 months to keep the boxes, each containing about 2,500 pages, secret.In the documents, economists warn that the president's plan had "fatal flaws" that could cause "real-world havoc" and "potential disasters" for the nation's health care system.
NEWS
December 10, 1990
Annapolis Mayor Al Hopkins cut the ribbon to welcome the new Johns Hopkins Health Plan office to Annapolis, at a recent ceremony conducted at the South River Health Center, 200 Harry S. Truman Parkway.The event, attended by politicians and community leaders, heralded the opening of the facility, which will serve members of the Johns Hopkins Health Plan as well as fee-for-services patients. The office is one of 70 medical facilities serving members of the plan.More than 100,000 Marylanders use the plan, which has contracts with most major area employers, the state of Maryland, the federal government and Anne Arundel County government.
NEWS
By Dr. Timothy F. Doran | March 7, 1998
YOUR Feb. 25 editorial "Sensible health plan for children" makes no sense. The piece contains misinformation and distortion, and suggests that you have not carefully researched this important subject.The reason health care for uninsured children is a major focus of this year's legislative session is that the federal government has made available to Maryland $60 million a year for five years to provide health coverage for uninsured children, a fact you neglected to mention.This money comes in a 2-to-1 federal grant, so Maryland would pay only $30 million (not the $76 million stated in your editorial)
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwartz and John Fairhall of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Maryland members of Congress expressed a wide range of reactions to President Clinton's health care proposal last night -- from warmly embracing its key elements to expressing strong skepticism.Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin of Baltimore, who has worked with the White House on crafting the plan, welcomed its official unveiling."I hope that by the end of 1994 we will have passed the basic plan that provides universal coverage, brings costs under control and deals with the other priorities" outlined by the president last night, he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
More than 372,500 people have enrolled in insurance through the Maryland health exchange as of May 31, exchange officials said Friday. More than 300,300 individuals gained coverage through Medicaid, including 95,889 converted from a former state program for low income people. Another 72,207 enrolled in private insurance plans. Open enrollment ended March 31 for private plans, though some who notified the exchange that they were having trouble signing up were given more time. Those who have a change in family, residence, income, work status or other consideration may qualify for a special enrollment.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Why are people surprised that Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown took a pass at attending the gubernatorial debate ( "The empty podium," May 28)? He took a pass when given the opportunity to lead the Maryland rollout of the Obamacare health plan. Mark Plogman, Pikesville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
HEALTH
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | April 18, 2014
Nearly 329,000 people have enrolled in insurance through the Maryland health exchange, officials reported Friday. As of April 15, 262,619 people have gained Medicaid coverage and 66,203 enrolled in a private plan sold on the exchange website. Open enrollment ended March 31 for private plans, though some who notified the exchange that they were having trouble signing up were given more time. Those who have a change in family, residence, income, work status or other consideration may qualify for a special enrollment.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
The Maryland health exchange reported Friday that 33,251 people had signed up for private insurance plans online as of Feb. 15, an uptick of just over 2,000 from the week before. The exchange website for the uninsured and underinsured created by the federal Affordable Care Act has been adding a similar number of enrollees each week this year, according to regular updates provided by the exchange. Another 8,581 people enrolled in Medicaid through the exchange website this past week.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
After spending several hours over two days to enroll in an insurance plan through the glitch-prone Maryland health exchange, it took another two days to cancel the policy. Agents at the CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield call center have been inundated with calls from people having trouble buying a new policy through the exchange. Maybe that's why they had little time to get me out of mine. (The insurance would have cost me more out-of-pocket than the insurance provided by my employer.)
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,Tribune Media Services | October 7, 2007
There's nothing more important than your health. It sounds like something a parent would say. But, now, many employers seem to be just as concerned. This fall during open enrollment, the period when workers can re-elect or pick new company benefits, you may find several changes in health-plan options, all stressing healthier lifestyles - and fewer costly claims. "Companies want to get employees more involved in managing their health care," said Scott Ziemba, a senior consultant at Watson Wyatt Worldwide Inc., a human resources consulting firm.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The administration plans to "relaunch" its health plan in two weeks, when the proposal goes in final form to Congress -- a tacit admission that the proposal has lost momentum since its unveiling last month.The second kickoff will probably include campaign-style stops across the country by President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, as well as the release of a video and a book written in plain language, a senior White House aide said.At the same time, the senior aide expressed the frustration felt by many in the White House over the steady drumbeat of congressional criticism about the delay in submitting the plan in legislative form.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
The Maryland health exchange has enrolled another 9,600 people in health insurance, according to the exchange's weekly report. The bulk, about 7,500, enrolled in Medicaid, the health program for the poor. Another 2,053 enrolled in private health plans during the week ending Feb. 8, bringing the total in private plans to 31,112. Maryland was one of 14 states that chose to runs its own exchange where the uninsured and underinsured could buy health insurance. The enrollment numbers are far below goals set for the exchange during open enrollment, which lasts through March 31. Exchange officials blame software glitches, as well as in-fighting among contractors, for the problems.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
I don't understand why liberals and progressives think that President Obama is so wonderful. His State of the Union Address was empty of serious proposals, disappointing and unresponsive to the real problems Americans face and disturbing in its tendencies toward unilateral action ( "Obama talks economy, immigration in State of the Union address," Jan. 28). There is a pattern of lawlessness in this administration. If Mr. Obama doesn't agree with a particular law, he says he won't enforce or comply with it. He hasn't known how to tell the truth since he was elected president.
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