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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 19, 2014
Maryland health officials are warning consumers not to eat any cheese products made by Roos Foods because they are “presumptively positive” for Listeria, a bacteria that can cause serious infection. Roos brands include Santa Rosa de Lima, Amigo, Mexicana, Suyapa, La Chapina and La Purisima Crema Nica. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene continue testing the products to confirm the presence of Listeria in the cheese made by the Kenton, Del. Company, which did not respond to request for comment..
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While Maryland health officials urged caregivers this week to be alert for possible Ebola virus cases, they were also quick to emphasize there are other — perhaps more contagious — pathogens that they are also monitoring. Public health officials around the world remain on watch for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, while the United States is on guard for enterovirus D68 cases among children. As flu season begins, surveillance for that illness is resuming, and other potentially deadly threats such as avian flu lurk, as well.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 24, 2012
The “stomach flu” appears to be going around and state health officials are warning residents to take some precautions. The officials say these cases in recent weeks are not really the flu. They are cases of viral gastroenteritis, which gives sufferers inflammation of the stomach and intestines. The inflammation causes diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain among other symptoms. Norovirus, which many people associate with mass illnesses on cruise ships, is the most common cause, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Maryland public health officials are putting caregivers - from Baltimore's major teaching hospitals to strip-mall urgent care centers to ambulances - on heightened alert for signs of Ebola as details emerge about missteps in Dallas, where a man with the deadly virus was initially sent home from a hospital. Health care providers have for months been preparing for Ebola's potential arrival in the U.S., and on Tuesday confirmed a Liberian man visiting family in Dallas had the virus.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 5, 2012
State health officials have issued an alert about Baczol, an unapproved medicine found in many Latino convenience stores. Concerns about the drug came to light after a clinician at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore found that some patients were giving it to their children as cold medicine. She contacted the Baltimore City Public Health Department which investigated and found the drug sold in three Latino convenience stores. Further investigation found the drug is also for sale in other stores in Maryland.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
Health officials have confirmed a case of rabies in a 6-week-old Jersey calf at an educational center in Prince George's County where elementary and middle school students learned about farming and natural resources in the Potomac River watershed. Officials with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene have made it a priority to assess about 70 children who recently visited the Hard Bargain Farm in Accokeek. In particular, they are investigating whether any children participated in bottle feeding the calf whose mother died in an accident, said Katherine Feldman, a state public health veterinarian.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
State health officials are reminding parents to get their kids their vaccinations before school starts. Some of the requirements are new, and students can be kept out of the classroom if they do not have the proper shots. “We have spent the past year helping parents and schools prepare for these school immunization requirements,” said Dr. Laura Herrera, deputy secretary for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Public Health Services. “We want to be sure all Maryland children start the school year with up-to-date vaccinations and are ready to learn.” Students entering kindergarten now must have had two chickenpox (varicella)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | October 26, 2012
State health officials in an article in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association criticized the oversight of compounding pharmacies and said the facilities need to take more responsibility in protecting patients from tainted drugs. The article, which appeared first in Friday's online edition of the medical journal, comes as the country still reels from a national meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids from the New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
High temperatures and pollution have made conditions ripe for potentially dangerous bacteria carried in Chesapeake Bay waters, leading state and local health officials to warn swimmers, fishermen and shellfish eaters to take precautions. The naturally occurring bacteria, vibrio, can cause gastrointestinal illness as well as nasty skin infections — and sometimes can kill. So far this year, 24 Maryland cases of vibrio have been recorded, close to the average annual count of 30, but the season is far from over and officials say many cases likely go unreported.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland health officials may ask state lawmakers for permission to oversee plastic surgery centers, a move inspired in part by the death of a Lochearn woman after liposuction. The state health department had already been considering whether to ask for a change to the legal definition of free-standing surgery centers to align regulations with medical risk instead of insurance billing practices, Secretary Joshua Sharfstein said. Surgical centers currently are subject to state inspection only if they meet certain criteria in how they bill insurance companies, he said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Baltimore County health officials say a rabid cat was found and captured near Delight Road in Reisterstown this week. The male cat, found Monday, is a gray, tiger-striped tabby, and officials say it may have had a limp while it was in the community. The health department is urging anyone who had direct exposure to the cat between Sept. 14-Sept. 28 to seek medical treatment and contact county health officials immediately. People can contact the health department at 410-887-6011 during the day, or at 410-832-7182 after 4:30 p.m. alisonk@baltsun.com twitter.com/aliknez
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A rabid cat bit a person at Pocomoke River State Park this week and health authorities are encouraging anyone who had contact with the animal to contact them. The Worcester County Health Department said an adult was bitten by the cat at the Milburn Landing campground area in the Snow Hill park on Monday. The cat was found, euthanized and sent for rabies testing, which was later confirmed by a state lab, health officials said. The cat was a medium adult male, dark gray in color with white under its chin and belly and four white feet.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
As an unusual strain of virus continues its march across the country — showing up most recently in Pennsylvania and Virginia — health officials in Maryland are warning doctors to be on the lookout and advising parents to prepare. Enterovirus is common, with millions in the United States sickened every year, most with mild cases. But the relatively rare strain called EV-D68 can cause severe respiratory illness in children with asthma or other health conditions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns.
HEALTH
Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
As health officials fail to contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, recent scares at two Baltimore-area hospitals highlight the need for hospitals here and across the United States to prepare space and equipment for what some consider inevitable - the arrival of the deadly virus here. While experts say the chances of an epidemic spreading in the U.S. are low, there is a real possibility that someone could come down with Ebola after returning from a trip to Africa, they said. Hospitals routinely ask patients with flu-like symptoms whether they have visited that continent recently.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Two people who stayed at an Econo Lodge in northern Ocean City this summer have tested positive for Legionnaires' disease and low levels of Legionella bacteria were found in the hotel's water pipes, Worcester County health officials said. Health officials zeroed in on the 145th Street hotel after a second person who stayed there tested positive for the infection Aug. 28, said Kathleen Derr, nursing program manager for communicable disease for the county health department. The other person became ill earlier in the summer, she said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
State health officials are reminding parents to get their kids their vaccinations before school starts. Some of the requirements are new, and students can be kept out of the classroom if they do not have the proper shots. “We have spent the past year helping parents and schools prepare for these school immunization requirements,” said Dr. Laura Herrera, deputy secretary for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Public Health Services. “We want to be sure all Maryland children start the school year with up-to-date vaccinations and are ready to learn.” Students entering kindergarten now must have had two chickenpox (varicella)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
State health officials are warning fans who were at Friday's Ravens game of a possible exposure to rabies via a bat. A bat landed on a person sitting in section 500 of M&T Bank Stadium as the Ravens played the Detroit Lions in a preseason game, officials said. It isn't known whether the bat had rabies because the person brushed it off and the bat flew away. But health officials said it's possible other people seated in the area could have touched the bat. But health officials are cautioning those who may have touched the bat during the game to contact their local health department.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 28, 2014
As Harford County and state health agencies track West Nile virus and other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, such as chikungunya and dengue viruses, the Harford County Health Department cautions residents to take appropriate measures to reduce their risk of infection. According to the health department, people can reduce the risk of being infected with WNV by using insect repellent and wearing protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites. "Prevention is key and there are actions individuals can take to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne infection," Harford County Health Officer Susan Kelly said in a release.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
State health officials are urging Marylanders to be wary of mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus and, now, the dengue-like virus chikungunya - raising concerns after it was reported in a Florida man Thursday. The chikungunya case is believed to be the first that was contracted in the U.S.; other cases had been reported in people who had recently traveled to areas where the virus is prevalent. That is raising concern over the possible spread of the virus, which is not usually fatal but can cause fever and debilitating joint pain and cannot be treated.
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