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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
State lawmakers are considering changing personnel laws for county health officers, following the messy and public firing of Anne Arundel's health officer earlier this year. "We need to move forward," Del. Joseline Pena-Melnyk told attendees of a meeting in Annapolis Wednesday of a group called the Caucus of African-American Leaders. Pena-Melnyk, a Democrat who represents Prince George's and Anne Arundel, said she'll seek to form a work group in the House of Delegates to review how health officers are hired and fired.
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NEWS
October 11, 2014
Howard County's public schools are among the top in the nation. We cultivate a vibrant learning community that prepares students to thrive in a dynamic world. We also talk with kids about sex and relationships: "You can get pregnant any time you have sexual intercourse;" the site says. "Wearing a latex condom, taking birth control pills or using other contraceptives are very effective at preventing pregnancy. However the absolute way to not get pregnant is to not have sex at all. " So what was wrong with one of our elected county school board members alerting the board and its student members that a local Giant supermarket is asking the age of those who purchase condoms?
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
In a move that both the county attorney and elected officials conceded was unusual, the Anne Arundel County Council on Monday weighed a measure that would spell the ouster of the county's top health official, Angela M. Wakhweya. Wakhweya is the first African-American to hold the position in the county health department's 81-year history. At the council's meeting Monday, County Attorney Jonathan Hodgson informed the legislators that Maryland Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene Joshua M. Sharfstein had already given his support for removing Wakhweya and installed an acting health officer to replace her. Hodgson declined to spell out the nature of the accusations against Wakhweya.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
State lawmakers are considering changing personnel laws for county health officers, following the messy and public firing of Anne Arundel's health officer earlier this year. "We need to move forward," Del. Joseline Pena-Melnyk told attendees of a meeting in Annapolis Wednesday of a group called the Caucus of African-American Leaders. Pena-Melnyk, a Democrat who represents Prince George's and Anne Arundel, said she'll seek to form a work group in the House of Delegates to review how health officers are hired and fired.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Despite the presence of an overflow crowd offering support, the County council voted to affirm the ouster of health officer Angela S. Wakhweya, the first African-American to hold the job in the history of the county department. After being ousted from her position as Anne Arundel County health officer, Dr. Angela S. Wakhweya maintained in a statement issued Wednesday that she had, "done nothing illegal, nothing unethical, nothing unsafe, nothing immoral and nothing fraudulent. " Nevertheless, a day earlier, at a sometimes emotional meeting that drew a standing-room-only crowd, the Anne Arundel County Council voted to affirm the dismissal of Wakhweya, the first African-American to hold the position in the 81-year history of the county health department.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Dr. Angela Wakhweya began her medical career in her native Uganda, at the height of the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where she saw many patients, friends and even some family members succumb to the deadly disease. The experience propelled her into the public health field, and eventually led her to Maryland, where she worked on infectious disease prevention at the state health department in Baltimore. Maryland ranks fourth in the nation in terms of newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS cases.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
The Harford County Council has appointed Susan Kelly acting health officer and Dr. Yngvild Olsen as deputy health officer, effective Jan. 3. Kelly, a longtime department employee, had been deputy to Dr. Andrew Bernstein, who resigned this month amid a dispute over proposed cuts in the department's budget. County officials said they are likely to take a few months to hire Bernstein's replacement. "I feel confident with Ms. Kelly at the helm," said Billy Boniface, the council president.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | December 4, 1994
William McConway Hiscock, a public health officer who helped write federal comprehensive health legislation in the 1960s, died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of pancreatic cancer.Mr. Hiscock was a Medicaid Bureau program officer for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Care Financing Administration in Baltimore until his death last week. He was 71 and lived in Towson.In his 47-year career, Mr. Hiscock also worked in health-related positions, ranging from directing studies in public health training for the Yale University School of Medicine to being executive director of the Central Maryland Health Systems Agency Inc."
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | November 7, 1994
Two speakers will address women's health issues at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at the monthly meeting of the Woman's Club of Linthicum Heights.Frances Phillips, a registered nurse and county health officer, will speak on the high incidence of cancer in our area and what the health department feels can be done about it.Linda Yergey, oncology clinical specialist at Harbor Hospital, will discuss cancer from the clinical aspect. There will be time for discussion after the presentations, particularly about what our community can do to help solve this problem.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 4, 2004
The Harford County Council is set to review two applications Tuesday night for a county health officer, a position that has been vacant since Tommy Thomas retired last year. The nomination takes on added importance because the department's acting health officer, Dr. Beverly Stump, is retiring at the end of this month. The council's personnel committee has narrowed the field to two physicians, said Council President Robert S. Wagner, who declined to elaborate further because it is a personnel issue.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Despite the presence of an overflow crowd offering support, the County council voted to affirm the ouster of health officer Angela S. Wakhweya, the first African-American to hold the job in the history of the county department. After being ousted from her position as Anne Arundel County health officer, Dr. Angela S. Wakhweya maintained in a statement issued Wednesday that she had, "done nothing illegal, nothing unethical, nothing unsafe, nothing immoral and nothing fraudulent. " Nevertheless, a day earlier, at a sometimes emotional meeting that drew a standing-room-only crowd, the Anne Arundel County Council voted to affirm the dismissal of Wakhweya, the first African-American to hold the position in the 81-year history of the county health department.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
In a meeting that drew a standing-room-only crowd to its chambers, the Anne Arundel County Council voted Tuesday to support a recommendation by State Department of Health and Human Hygiene Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein to remove the county's health officer, Angela S. Wakhweya. Before voting, the council passed an amendment to the measure that would put Wakhweya on paid leave for 60 days before her dismissal and urge that Sharfstein work with her and her attorneys to find her another directorial position within the state health department.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In a move that the county attorney and elected officials conceded was highly unusual, the Anne Arundel County Council weighed a measure this week that would have spelled the ouster of the county's top health official, Dr. Angela M. Wakhweya, the first African-American to hold the position in the county Health Department's 81-year history. Though details of the complaints against Wakhweya have not been made public, her boss, Maryland Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene Joshua M. Sharfstein, sent County Executive John R. Leopold and each council member a letter last week asking their "concurrence … in the removal" of Wakhweya based on assessments made by the state's health and personnel departments, as well as its director of equal opportunity programs.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Bob Duggan frequently refers to "our national disease-care system" when he talks about his new book, employing a term he has used across his 40-plus years as a healing-arts clinician and educator. As co-founder and former president of Tai Sophia Institute, a North Laurel graduate school of complementary medicine, wellness-based education and research, he believes that labeling our current system "health care" is a gigantic misnomer — and a point of national disgrace. In "Breaking the Iron Triangle: Reducing Health-Care Costs in Corporate America," Duggan offers a vision of a sustainable, wellness-based future in which corporations and entrepreneurs are able to slash rising health-care costs by investing in programs that focus on wellness instead of disease.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 28, 2012
On the day the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the central provisions of the federal health care overhaul he has championed as Maryland's most visible public health official, Dr. Peter Beilenson revealed, publicly and for the first time, that he has Parkinson's disease. He brought it up during my WYPR radio show Thursday afternoon, and he mentioned it to television reporters who chased him for a sound bite after the court's historic ruling. "I was diagnosed five years ago," said Beilenson, 52, the chief health officer of Howard County and former health commissioner of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Dr. John Leake Pitts, a retired pediatrician who during a long career in public health had been the acting Anne Arundel County health officer, died of cancer Wednesday at his Annapolis Roads home. He was 85. Born in Roanoke, Va., he was the son of John Leake Pitts Sr., a pharmacist, and Mary B. Allen, a homemaker and schoolteacher. As a young man he worked the soda fountain at his father's store. After attending Roanoke College, he graduated from the the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | January 6, 1994
The county health officer is looking for money to reopen a pediatric development clinic that became a casualty of state budget cuts more than a year ago.The clinic, which served about 80 children annually, provided complete neurological evaluations and follow-up care to children with behavioral problems or learning and developmental disabilities.Dr. Janet Neslen, the health officer, said she plans to approach the county commissioners to discuss funding for reopening the clinic.She said there is a significant need for its services.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Long workdays and extended commutes to Baltimore and Washington have left many Howard County residents with less time to exercise and fewer chances to cook at home, the county's top health official says, often causing them to choose restaurants with their larger food portions. The time-crunched lifestyle has caused obesity to remain a persistent health concern in one of Maryland's wealthiest counties, said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Howard's health officer. In less-affluent communities, obesity is often a result of fewer choices for affordable, healthier food.
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