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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 11, 2012
Americans are paying a little more for health coverage this year. Premiums rose modestly for single and family employer-sponsored coverage, according to an annual survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust. The average annual premium in 2012 was $5,615 for single coverage, a 3 percent increase from 2011, while family coverage was $15,745, a 4 percent increase.   Companies continued to offer insurance despite the country's sluggish economic environment.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
A court has ordered Baltimore County to reduce the health insurance premiums it charges hundreds of retired police officers. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter gave the county 10 days to comply with the order. The ruling is the latest in the legal dispute between the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county government over what proportion of the retirees' health insurance premiums the county pays. A county spokeswoman said Thursday the county's attorneys are reviewing the order, but declined to comment further.
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NEWS
July 28, 2011
Contrary to Robert Erlandson's letter ( "Van Hollen shows why it will be so hard to reduce the deficit," July 26), Rep. Chris Van Hollen's op-ed ("Medicaid cuts would hurt us all," July 25) correctly pointed out the consequences of cutting Medicaid. As Rep. Van Hollen wrote, whenever uninsured people go to the hospital and get care they cannot afford, we all pay for that with increase premiums that are used to cover uncompensated hospital costs. According to Families USA, about $1,000 of each of our health insurance premiums go every year to cover the health care costs of the uninsured.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | March 4, 2013
Federal deficits are too large, and mounting national debt threatens future generations. But as Democrats and Republicans squabble over the mandatory spending cuts known as sequestration that went into effect Friday night, they are failing to face the facts of our budget situation or acknowledge the lessons of history. Since 2007, annual federal spending is up $1 trillion, and deficits jumped from $161 billion to $1.2 trillion over five years. Higher taxes on the wealthy and Obamacare levies will pull down the gap in 2014, but then it will rise again.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
A court has ordered Baltimore County to reduce the health insurance premiums it charges hundreds of retired police officers. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter gave the county 10 days to comply with the order. The ruling is the latest in the legal dispute between the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county government over what proportion of the retirees' health insurance premiums the county pays. A county spokeswoman said Thursday the county's attorneys are reviewing the order, but declined to comment further.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | April 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is considering a tax on workers' health benefits to finance medical coverage for more than 30 million uninsured Americans, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan says.The approach, which Sullivan refers to as a "tax cap," would make employer-paid health benefits above a certain dollar amount subject to tax as personal income."We are looking at a number of strategies, such as a 'tax cap' on employer-provided health care to provide funds for those who don't have [insurance]
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
Although health insurance premiums for small businesses increased last year, nearly 10 percent more people were covered under those policies, according to a survey report released yesterday."
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | September 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Budget Office warned yesterday that one of the most important elements of President Clinton's health plan, federal limits on private health insurance premiums, could harm consumers by forcing a reduction in valuable medical care and restricting access to new medical technology.More than any other factor, it is the soaring cost that has ignited public interest in efforts to overhaul the nation's medical system. Mr. Clinton asserts that his proposal would control costs primarily by encouraging competition in the health care market.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2003
With a possible war against Iraq looming, Baltimore County Council members are considering offering full pay and health benefits for employees called into active military duty for two years. The proposal, introduced last month by Councilman John Olszewski Sr., would also offer county employees assurance that they will have their jobs with the government when they return home from service. Council members are expected to vote on the measure at their meeting tonight. After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the county continued to pay the salaries and health and life insurance premiums for employees called into military duty.
NEWS
By Charles Johnson, Petey Green and Walter Middlebrooks | May 31, 2009
As presidents of three Maryland black chambers of commerce, our goals include promoting economic stability while eradicating barriers to growth within Maryland's black- and minority-owned business community. But it is difficult to promote economic stability while insurance costs are skyrocketing. The Maryland Health Care for All! plan ( www.healthcareforall.com) offers a solution that is both fair and practical. Two-thirds of Maryland workers enjoy company-sponsored health insurance, but our members are being forced to cut back on these benefits.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 16, 2013
President Barack Obama's approach to so-called "climate change" appears to include recycling old ideas. In his State of the Union address, the president recycled the idea of spending more on education, though we are still getting unsatisfactory results -- a fact he inadvertently acknowledged by saying we're not keeping up with other countries in science and math. He maintained there are tens of thousands of jobs available, but companies can't fill them because public schools aren't teaching students what they need to know.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 20, 2012
In form, President Barack Obama came back strongly in Tuesday's debate with Mitt Romney, but substantively he continues to lag behind the Republican candidate. That's because the president has a record to defend, and it isn't a good one. Television being what it is, the president looked and sounded good, but the air seems to have gone out of his messianic balloon as voters focus more on facts and less on spin. If promises mean anything -- and they don't to most politicians -- Mr. Romney hit the president where it hurts: on his failure to live up to most of his promises.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 11, 2012
Americans are paying a little more for health coverage this year. Premiums rose modestly for single and family employer-sponsored coverage, according to an annual survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust. The average annual premium in 2012 was $5,615 for single coverage, a 3 percent increase from 2011, while family coverage was $15,745, a 4 percent increase.   Companies continued to offer insurance despite the country's sluggish economic environment.
NEWS
July 28, 2011
Contrary to Robert Erlandson's letter ( "Van Hollen shows why it will be so hard to reduce the deficit," July 26), Rep. Chris Van Hollen's op-ed ("Medicaid cuts would hurt us all," July 25) correctly pointed out the consequences of cutting Medicaid. As Rep. Van Hollen wrote, whenever uninsured people go to the hospital and get care they cannot afford, we all pay for that with increase premiums that are used to cover uncompensated hospital costs. According to Families USA, about $1,000 of each of our health insurance premiums go every year to cover the health care costs of the uninsured.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
Things have just gone from bad to worse for unemployed workers. The U.S. Senate last week failed to extend unemployment benefits that expired earlier this month. By the end of last week, more than 1.2 million people — including 14,700 Marylanders — lost their benefits, according to Department of Labor estimates. On top of that, Congress hasn't restored another recently expired subsidy that has been paying the bulk of health insurance premiums for workers who lost their jobs since September 2008.
NEWS
By John O. Fox | August 31, 2009
It's the elephant in the room that the health reform committees haven't decided whether to take on. Yet Congress must address the dysfunctional federal tax subsidy for health insurance if it is serious about eliminating excessive health insurance and health care costs, extending health care coverage to most of the 46 million uninsured Americans, and paying for it in a fair and sensible way. What should be a slam dunk, at least for Democrats, has been...
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | March 2, 1998
YOU DON'T have to turn to an income-tax preparer this year to tussle with the details of last summer's tax cuts. There are plenty of new rules, but most of them won't affect your 1997 returns.There's one big exception: figuring the tax on capital gains, which is going to be, um, painstaking.Otherwise, this year's tax return remains pretty cut and dried. Most taxpayers can probably use last year's return as a guide, says IRS Commissioner Charles Rossotti.Here's what's new:The standard deduction.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2004
BOSTON - Seeking to further his argument that the middle class is suffering under the Bush administration, Sen. John F. Kerry plans to release an economic study today arguing that a so-called misery index has worsened drastically for middle-income families. The study was conducted by the campaign's economic advisers, including former Clinton economic adviser Gene Sperling and former Clinton Treasury official Roger C. Altman. The report examined median family incomes, college tuition, health insurance costs, gasoline prices, personal bankruptcies, homeownership rates and private sector job growth.
NEWS
By Charles Johnson, Petey Green and Walter Middlebrooks | May 31, 2009
As presidents of three Maryland black chambers of commerce, our goals include promoting economic stability while eradicating barriers to growth within Maryland's black- and minority-owned business community. But it is difficult to promote economic stability while insurance costs are skyrocketing. The Maryland Health Care for All! plan ( www.healthcareforall.com) offers a solution that is both fair and practical. Two-thirds of Maryland workers enjoy company-sponsored health insurance, but our members are being forced to cut back on these benefits.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
Frustrated by runaway health costs, America's largest employers are moving rapidly to open more primary-care medical centers in their offices and factories as a way to offer convenient service and free or low-cost health care. Within the past two years, companies including Toyota, Sprint Nextel, Florida Power & Light, Credit Suisse and Pepsi Bottling Group have opened or expanded on-site clinics. Many employers are adding or planning to add even more clinics, which were experimented with about 30 years ago but fell out of favor amid questions about their cost-effectiveness.
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