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Health Information Technology

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NEWS
By Drew Greenblatt | August 18, 2008
Health care reform is a divisive issue in Washington, but there is wide agreement on one solution to lower costs and improve care: health information technology, or health IT. Health IT replaces paper medical records with electronic records. This is how I run my Baltimore-based wire basket and hook company; shouldn't my doctor do the same? The power of information technology is familiar to anyone who pays bills online, buys on Amazon or downloads music on an iPod. My company and other manufacturers use IT systems to track products from assembly line to store shelf, speed delivery to customers, conduct online sales and more.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Northrop Grumman Corp. has signed on as a sponsor of DreamIt Health Baltimore, a business accelerator backed by Johns Hopkins University and BioHealth Innovation Inc. The accelerator gives startups $50,000 in seed funding, help gathering customers, and accounting and legal support, along with access to the expertise of the sponsors. Philadelphia-based accelerator DreamIt Ventures launched the incubator. Leaders at the companies and Hopkins will choose up to 10 startups for the accelerator, starting with an "entrepreneurial boot-camp" in Baltimore from January through May. Applications were due Nov. 18. Northrop Grumman provides health information technology products and services to federal agencies, the military and state, local and international governments.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Northrop Grumman Corp. has signed on as a sponsor of DreamIt Health Baltimore, a business accelerator backed by Johns Hopkins University and BioHealth Innovation Inc. The accelerator gives startups $50,000 in seed funding, help gathering customers, and accounting and legal support, along with access to the expertise of the sponsors. Philadelphia-based accelerator DreamIt Ventures launched the incubator. Leaders at the companies and Hopkins will choose up to 10 startups for the accelerator, starting with an "entrepreneurial boot-camp" in Baltimore from January through May. Applications were due Nov. 18. Northrop Grumman provides health information technology products and services to federal agencies, the military and state, local and international governments.
NEWS
By Ritu Agarwal | May 31, 2012
As a nation, our collective attention is increasingly drawn to the way in which health care costs are crippling the economy. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services projects this cost, if unchecked, could rise to $3.4 trillion in 2015, a whopping 18.3 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product. Acknowledging this escalation, policymakers have rolled up their sleeves in search of cost-cutting measures to improve efficiency without adversely affecting quality, including more extensive use of health information technology, a reduction in unneeded and unnecessary testing, and a focus on disease prevention rather than cure.
NEWS
By Gene Ransom | February 9, 2012
At a time when physicians and policymakers alike are being asked to reduce health care costs without sacrificing quality care, it's crucial that we unleash the enormous potential for savings that could come from exciting new advances in health information technology. There's no better example of the revolution under way in medical care than electronic medical records and electronic prescribing systems, which not only allow doctors to generate prescriptions and orders electronically and transmit them directly, but provide instant access to drug reference information and a patient's complete medical history.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 20, 2012
Maryland's 46 acute care hospitals can now all share information electronically on patients admitted, discharged for transferred. The “encounter level” data can be passed along in real time via the Maryland Health Information Exchange , a statewide system of secure information sharing among hospitals, doctors' offices and health organizations, according to Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who announced the system recently. Some hospitals also are sharing lab and radiology reports, consult notes and other clinical data.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
As he looks for ways to pay for universal health coverage, President Barack Obama is placing a multibillion-dollar bet on electronic health records. The goal is to get all of the nation's doctors to make the move from clipboard to computer by 2014, thus creating a national health information network that proponents from across the political spectrum say will improve care, advance medical knowledge and save the country tens of billions of dollars annually. That future can be glimpsed in Dundalk, where H. Edward Parker has been a patient at Johns Hopkins Community Physicians for decades.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Stuart Butler's op-ed ("An enterprising approach to health," Feb. 29) on what our proposed Health Enterprise Zones (HEZs) can learn from urban "economic" enterprise zones is a valuable critique. His focus on incentives, innovation and community partnerships echoes the strengths of our legislation, the Maryland Health Improvement and Disparities Reduction Act. Like economic enterprise zones, we intend to blanket a distressed community with incentives that draw in the expert people and quality services needed to address a specific problem: health disparities among underserved communities.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | June 11, 2008
Maryland and Washington, D.C., are among 12 cities and states whose doctors will participate in a $150 million Medicare pilot project offering physicians incentives to adopt electronic health records. The five-year effort will help as many as 1,200 small practices around the country switch from paper to digital recordkeeping. Michael O. Leavitt, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, announced the federal initiative yesterday at a news conference at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Howard Community College is part of a three-college consortium that will launch a Mount Airy-based health care training center to propel students into those high-demand careers, HCC officials said. On Monday, HCC joined Carroll and Frederick community colleges and state elected officials for the groundbreaking of the Mount Airy College Center for Health Care Education. The facility, which is slated to open in the fall of 2012, will provide health care-related programs to students from the three community colleges at a site that school officials say is easily accessible.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Stuart Butler's op-ed ("An enterprising approach to health," Feb. 29) on what our proposed Health Enterprise Zones (HEZs) can learn from urban "economic" enterprise zones is a valuable critique. His focus on incentives, innovation and community partnerships echoes the strengths of our legislation, the Maryland Health Improvement and Disparities Reduction Act. Like economic enterprise zones, we intend to blanket a distressed community with incentives that draw in the expert people and quality services needed to address a specific problem: health disparities among underserved communities.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 20, 2012
Maryland's 46 acute care hospitals can now all share information electronically on patients admitted, discharged for transferred. The “encounter level” data can be passed along in real time via the Maryland Health Information Exchange , a statewide system of secure information sharing among hospitals, doctors' offices and health organizations, according to Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who announced the system recently. Some hospitals also are sharing lab and radiology reports, consult notes and other clinical data.
NEWS
By Gene Ransom | February 9, 2012
At a time when physicians and policymakers alike are being asked to reduce health care costs without sacrificing quality care, it's crucial that we unleash the enormous potential for savings that could come from exciting new advances in health information technology. There's no better example of the revolution under way in medical care than electronic medical records and electronic prescribing systems, which not only allow doctors to generate prescriptions and orders electronically and transmit them directly, but provide instant access to drug reference information and a patient's complete medical history.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Howard Community College is part of a three-college consortium that will launch a Mount Airy-based health care training center to propel students into those high-demand careers, HCC officials said. On Monday, HCC joined Carroll and Frederick community colleges and state elected officials for the groundbreaking of the Mount Airy College Center for Health Care Education. The facility, which is slated to open in the fall of 2012, will provide health care-related programs to students from the three community colleges at a site that school officials say is easily accessible.
NEWS
June 3, 2010
For the past decade, my encounters with the health care system have typically involved nothing more than a routine checkup every two years. Last month it was very different — and very revealing about the shortcomings of our low-tech medical record-keeping system. I spent five days in a hospital ICU and five days in a medical/surgical ward. I was diagnosed with acute, multi-lobar pneumonia, which required that a pulmonary and infectious disease consultant be called in, in addition to the ICU doctor and the staff in the regular ward.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
As he looks for ways to pay for universal health coverage, President Barack Obama is placing a multibillion-dollar bet on electronic health records. The goal is to get all of the nation's doctors to make the move from clipboard to computer by 2014, thus creating a national health information network that proponents from across the political spectrum say will improve care, advance medical knowledge and save the country tens of billions of dollars annually. That future can be glimpsed in Dundalk, where H. Edward Parker has been a patient at Johns Hopkins Community Physicians for decades.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | March 17, 2006
As the Department of Veterans Affairs evacuated hundreds of patients from its New Orleans hospital three days before the levees failed, another crucial part of the federal government's relief effort was air-lifted to Houston: two backup computer tapes holding more than 180,000 electronic health records. The tapes included veterans' allergies, medicines and basic information -- enough data that any evacuated veteran could be treated at any veterans hospital. Without electronic records, hospital staff would have spent critical minutes, even hours, lugging thousands of paper files to higher ground.
NEWS
By Ritu Agarwal | May 31, 2012
As a nation, our collective attention is increasingly drawn to the way in which health care costs are crippling the economy. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services projects this cost, if unchecked, could rise to $3.4 trillion in 2015, a whopping 18.3 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product. Acknowledging this escalation, policymakers have rolled up their sleeves in search of cost-cutting measures to improve efficiency without adversely affecting quality, including more extensive use of health information technology, a reduction in unneeded and unnecessary testing, and a focus on disease prevention rather than cure.
NEWS
By Drew Greenblatt | August 18, 2008
Health care reform is a divisive issue in Washington, but there is wide agreement on one solution to lower costs and improve care: health information technology, or health IT. Health IT replaces paper medical records with electronic records. This is how I run my Baltimore-based wire basket and hook company; shouldn't my doctor do the same? The power of information technology is familiar to anyone who pays bills online, buys on Amazon or downloads music on an iPod. My company and other manufacturers use IT systems to track products from assembly line to store shelf, speed delivery to customers, conduct online sales and more.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | June 11, 2008
Maryland and Washington, D.C., are among 12 cities and states whose doctors will participate in a $150 million Medicare pilot project offering physicians incentives to adopt electronic health records. The five-year effort will help as many as 1,200 small practices around the country switch from paper to digital recordkeeping. Michael O. Leavitt, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, announced the federal initiative yesterday at a news conference at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis.
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