Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHealth Indicators
IN THE NEWS

Health Indicators

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
In West Baltimore's impoverished Hollins Market neighborhood, where the average life expectancy is about 63 years, residents shared beers and cigarettes on their front steps at midday yesterday while pedestrians using canes gingerly avoided two dead rats on the street. Across town in wealthy Roland Park, where residents live on average to be 83, the scene predicably changed. One gray-haired woman rushed to swimming lessons, while a family rode past on bikes and a man with an iPod jogged nearby.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 19, 2012
Flu immunization clinics The Department of Health will provide seasonal flu vaccinations at the following walk-in clinics. Both nasal-spray and injectable vaccinations will be available. •Glen Burnie Health Center, from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays, 416 A St. S.W., Glen Burnie. Information: 410-222-6633. •Parole Health Center, from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, 1950 Drew St., Annapolis. Information: 410-222-7247.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 25, 2000
MORE MILK, less junk food and seatbelts. It's that simple. Hard to believe, but those are three keys to improving child and adolescent health in this country. "Accidents and injuries are the leading killer of kids, and the leader in all these is the automobile," says Duane Alexander, the physician who directs the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. "Seventy percent of the kids who are killed are unrestrained," Alexander continues. "And that goes for little ones as well as teen-agers."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
In West Baltimore's impoverished Hollins Market neighborhood, where the average life expectancy is about 63 years, residents shared beers and cigarettes on their front steps at midday yesterday while pedestrians using canes gingerly avoided two dead rats on the street. Across town in wealthy Roland Park, where residents live on average to be 83, the scene predicably changed. One gray-haired woman rushed to swimming lessons, while a family rode past on bikes and a man with an iPod jogged nearby.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
Blood drive Baltimore Washington Medical Center will host a American Red Cross blood drive from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 20 at 301 Hospital Drive in Glen Burnie. The bloodmobile will be located near the BW Federal Credit Union. For information, call the American Red Cross at 866-236-3276. To schedule an appointment, call the BWMC marketing and communications department at 410-787-4367. Weight management and wellness seminar The University of Maryland Center for Weight Management and Wellness will offer a free seminar from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 17 in the Leo and Lysbeth Courtney Conference Center at BWMC, 305 Hospital Drive in Glen Burnie.
NEWS
September 17, 2001
THERE IS some good news in these dismal days: Baltimore's shockingly Third World-like health statistics have begun to improve. Drug-related emergency room visits, which were the nation's highest, are down 19 percent. Record-high infant mortality rates have dropped significantly. Tuberculosis rates, teen births and all types of venereal diseases also have decreased. "Something different is going on in Baltimore," says Health Commissioner Peter L. Beilenson. He thinks the improving trend is due to more effective drug treatment.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - U.S. worker productivity posted its sharpest fall since 1993 during the first quarter of the year, while labor costs jumped sharply, raising fresh concerns about the underlying strength of the economy. The Department of Labor, in a revised estimate, said productivity in the nonfarm business sector dropped by 1.2 percent during the first three months of 2001. Earlier, the department had reported only a 0.1 percent drop. Unit labor costs, an indicator of possible inflation, increased by 6.3 percent - the biggest spike since 1990.
NEWS
September 17, 2001
THERE IS some good news in these dismal days: Baltimore's shockingly Third World-like health statistics have begun to improve. Drug-related emergency room visits, which were the nation's highest, are down 19 percent. Record-high infant mortality rates have dropped significantly. Tuberculosis rates, teen births and all types of venereal diseases also have decreased. "Something different is going on in Baltimore," says Health Commissioner Peter L. Beilenson. He thinks the improving trend is due to more effective drug treatment.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - U.S. worker productivity posted its sharpest fall since 1993 during the first quarter of the year, while labor costs jumped sharply, raising fresh concerns about the underlying strength of the economy. The Department of Labor, in a revised estimate, said productivity in the nonfarm business sector dropped by 1.2 percent during the first three months of 2001. Earlier, the department had reported only a 0.1 percent drop. Unit labor costs, an indicator of possible inflation, increased by 6.3 percent - the biggest spike since 1990.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 25, 2000
MORE MILK, less junk food and seatbelts. It's that simple. Hard to believe, but those are three keys to improving child and adolescent health in this country. "Accidents and injuries are the leading killer of kids, and the leader in all these is the automobile," says Duane Alexander, the physician who directs the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. "Seventy percent of the kids who are killed are unrestrained," Alexander continues. "And that goes for little ones as well as teen-agers."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.