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NEWS
December 6, 2012
Op-ed contributor Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson argues that the Hostess Company's bankruptcy demonstrates the negative effects of the anti-obesity movement ("An unhealthy fear," Nov. 21). But the demise of Hostess was not caused by the anti-obesity movement, and Ms. Simpson never presents any evidence that movement directly affected the company. Ms. Simpson claims that Hostess is a "victim of another movement sweeping the country over the past couple of decades: 'low-fat' and 'health food' trends, and the current government-sponsored anti-obesity campaign.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Natural Markets Restaurants Inc. has opened eight of its Fresh & Green's supermarkets in Maryland and Washington, D.C., as it takes advantage of space made available by the departure of a rival grocery chain. Superfresh closed 25 stores earlier this month as its bankrupt parent, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., looked to cut costs and raise money to pay creditors. It found buyers for 12 of the stores but wasn't able to sell the others. The Fresh & Green's stores had all been opened by Monday, but will continue to stock up in coming weeks, the company said in a release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 11, 2013
Breathe Books in Hampden says it will add a health-food cafe to its store next month. Owner Susan Weis-Bohlen says all the offerings will have at least one of five features: gluten free, vegan, vegetarian, raw or Ayurvedic -- Ayurveda is a holistic type of medicine that originated in India. This goes along with the store's stated mission to provide "books, music, and spiritual and inspirational items to help people continue their practice and journey. " "We will not be using white flour or white sugar; every ingredient will have some sort of nutritional quality," said Weis-Bohlen, who also lectures about Ayurvedic medicine at the University of Maryland's medical school.
FEATURES
By William Rice and William Rice,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 20, 1996
At first glance, the gracefully rolling farm country in southeastern Pennsylvania, home to the butter-, cream- and pastry-loving Pennsylvania Dutch, might seem the wrong place to launch a healthy eating crusade. Over the years here, "healthy" has meant copious, as in "healthy portions."But swimming upstream comes easily to people who direct the Rodale Press of Emmaus, near Allentown, publishers of lifestyle books and a dozen periodicals including Prevention and Organic Gardening.Tom Ney, former restaurant chef and since 1979 test-kitchen director, food editor and food service supervisor for Rodale, says the approach is to "coach" readers and employees into a "more healthful everyday diet."
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
Looking for puffed rice flavored with spinach and kale? Have a hankering for ginseng ginger ale or maple-rosemary marinade? Well, Baltimore, your wait is almost over. You'll be able to find those items and more at Trader Joe's, a quirky cross between a health-food store, supermarket and discount center, which opens Friday in Towson. This will be the fourth Maryland location for the company that started as a convenience store in California and has grown to 131 locations in 11 states by catering to consumers who relish the unusual but don't want to pay a lot for it. "We've had 15 calls a day from people wanting to know when we're opening," said Mark Grumbach, the store's manager, who is called "commander" in keeping with Trader Joe's nautical theme.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
Not so long ago, only "health food nuts" preferred organically grown fresh fruits, vegetables and meats over their industrial agriculture equivalents. Nowadays, lots of people look for the words "organically grown" when they want to eat healthy. But what if turns out those little labels don't actually mean what people think, and that the foods they feel so good about eating aren't that different from the store brand - except for the price tag at checkout? That's the question raised by researchers at Stanford University in a study published this week, which found that the health benefits of organically grown produce, meats, eggs and cheeses are negligible when compared to their non-organic counterparts.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
With only a few days to go before opening, employees at Roots market hurried last week to fill freezers with garden burgers and veggie burritos and stock shelves with vitamins and herbal teas. "We have brokers here helping us stock shelves, we have family, we have contractors here," owner Jody Cutler said. "And in the midst of all that, we have employee interviews going on." The 11,000-square-foot natural foods market on Route 108 in Clarksville opened Friday as the county's second health food market and the largest tenant in an emerging shopping center that developers hope will play off River Hill Village Center, across the street.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 22, 2006
Customers walking into the new My Organic Market in Jessup are first greeted by about a dozen different kinds of apples. Gala, Honeycrisp, Fuji, Ambrosia and Golden Delicious are just a few and, like all the produce at My Organic Market - known as MOM - the apples are organic. The Jessup location, which opened in October, is the fourth store in the local chain, which opened in 1987 as a home-delivery and mail-order company called Organic Foods Express. Two years later, the company opened a store in Rockville, moving to a larger Rockville location in 1996.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 3, 1991
A small sect of dressmakers, construction workers and housewives centered around a health food store in Severna Park are shunning their stoves, animal products and processed foods in favor of a "paradise diet" of raw fruits, seeds, nuts and vegetables they say prevents heartdisease, cancer and arthritis.Eliminating all preservatives, toxins and "dead" cooked food, they believe, reduces the threat of disease to almost nil and frees the body's immune systems to attack tumors, impurities and diseased cells that cause most common modern ailments.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
Op-ed contributor Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson argues that the Hostess Company's bankruptcy demonstrates the negative effects of the anti-obesity movement ("An unhealthy fear," Nov. 21). But the demise of Hostess was not caused by the anti-obesity movement, and Ms. Simpson never presents any evidence that movement directly affected the company. Ms. Simpson claims that Hostess is a "victim of another movement sweeping the country over the past couple of decades: 'low-fat' and 'health food' trends, and the current government-sponsored anti-obesity campaign.
NEWS
By Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson | November 20, 2012
By now all of the Twinkies, Ho Hos and other Hostess baked goods have been stripped from grocery store shelves — and countless tributes paid via Tweets, blogs and Facebook posts. After more than 80 years in business, Hostess declared it was going under last week, dropping off the last of its Wonder Bread and Zingers deliveries, possibly ending jobs for more than 18,000 people, and marking yet another sad demise of a venerable American business institution. Now, in a perhaps ill-fated 11th-hour round of negotiations with its workers, Hostess is struggling to escape the Great Recession sandpit, or get bought out. Yet this octogenarian snack king is really just the victim of another movement sweeping the country over the past couple decades: "low-fat" and "health food" trends, and the current government-sponsored anti-obesity campaign.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
Not so long ago, only "health food nuts" preferred organically grown fresh fruits, vegetables and meats over their industrial agriculture equivalents. Nowadays, lots of people look for the words "organically grown" when they want to eat healthy. But what if turns out those little labels don't actually mean what people think, and that the foods they feel so good about eating aren't that different from the store brand - except for the price tag at checkout? That's the question raised by researchers at Stanford University in a study published this week, which found that the health benefits of organically grown produce, meats, eggs and cheeses are negligible when compared to their non-organic counterparts.
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | March 13, 2012
Someone, years ago, planted an oak tree on a narrow, forlorn divider toward the edge of a barren parking lot by a large building near my home. Largely ignored, this lone tree staunchly persevered and sank its roots deep into its diminutive field. It was noticeable, not because of the tree itself, which was just a modest, slight thing, but because of its acorns. They were everywhere - a bumper crop heaped upon the ground, where one had to tread carefully to keep one's feet firmly planted.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Natural Markets Restaurants Inc. has opened eight of its Fresh & Green's supermarkets in Maryland and Washington, D.C., as it takes advantage of space made available by the departure of a rival grocery chain. Superfresh closed 25 stores earlier this month as its bankrupt parent, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., looked to cut costs and raise money to pay creditors. It found buyers for 12 of the stores but wasn't able to sell the others. The Fresh & Green's stores had all been opened by Monday, but will continue to stock up in coming weeks, the company said in a release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
When somebody says "German food," you think sauerbraten, spaetzle and a nice Black Forest cake, true? And the phrase "German health food" would simply mean half-portions of strudel and dumplings and schnitzel, right? Not so fast, mein schatzi. 12:35 The doors of Cafe Einstein open up to a long, clean, well-lighted and comfortable dining area and counter that hasn't nearly shed its brand-new sheen. The cafe's two owners greeted us as we entered the shop at 1705 Eastern Avenue in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
The smell of vanilla mixed with coconut permeates A Touch of Nature, filling every corner of the natural food store with a scent reminiscent of pina coladas and tropical islands.Within the year, however, owner Peggy Taylor will trade the aromas for the real thing as she sells her business and retires to the Florida Keys."I started thinking about this when I bought a house in the Florida Keys about a year and a half ago," said Ms. Taylor, who has operated the shop since for 11 years. "The Keys are nothing like mainland Florida.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
No one ever called Smith Island Cake a health food. But now Health magazine has given the official state dessert a negative dietary superlative that may be outsized even for this multilayer chocolate creation. Health calls the cake Maryland's contribution to the Nation's 50 Fattiest Foods. Its 26 grams of fat make it worse than bacon-wrapped meatloaf in Alabama (17 grams of fat) but not as bad as Eskimo Ice Cream made from frozen animal fat in Alaska (91 grams of fat). The cake is named for the only inhabited island in the Chesapeake Bay and, as the magazine notes, "became so popular the governor signed the cake into law."
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
No one ever called Smith Island Cake a health food. But now Health magazine has given the official state dessert a negative dietary superlative that may be outsized even for this multilayer chocolate creation. Health calls the cake Maryland's contribution to the Nation's 50 Fattiest Foods. Its 26 grams of fat make it worse than bacon-wrapped meatloaf in Alabama (17 grams of fat) but not as bad as Eskimo Ice Cream made from frozen animal fat in Alaska (91 grams of fat). The cake is named for the only inhabited island in the Chesapeake Bay and, as the magazine notes, "became so popular the governor signed the cake into law."
HEALTH
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Move over, soy milk and wheat-grass juice. The elixir of the moment is a fermented tea promoted for health benefits ranging from improved digestion to cancer prevention. Called kombucha, it is a drink with a dual identity. There's the commercial version that comes in pretty pastels and fetches upward of $3 a bottle at natural foods stores. And there's the brown, pennies-per-serving home-brew, made with a scary-looking blob of bacteria. Whether store-bought or homemade, the drink has grown popular with fans of "probiotic" foods, which contain live bacteria cultures.
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