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NEWS
August 29, 2004
Screening Blood-pressure screenings. Joseph Center, 430 S. Broadway. Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. For people 55 and older. Free. 410-732-5000. Support Groups Breast cancer. LifeBridge Health & Fitness, 1836 Greene Tree Road, Pikesville. Thursday, at 7:30 p.m. For breast cancer patients and survivors. Register, 410-601-9355. Cancer. Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute, Sinai Hospital, 2401 W. Belvedere Ave. Thursday, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Information and registration, 410-601-9355. For calendar listings, please send typed news releases four weeks in advance to Harry Merritt, Features, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278 or send e-mail releases to healthcalendar@ baltsun.
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FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joined Ravens players Jacoby Jones and Justin Tucker and crowds of local children for a workout at M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday - and it was broadcast on national television. The crowd was challenged to run up and down 10,000 of the stadium's steps, part of a yearlong campaign to promote health and fitness in Baltimore on NBC's "Today" show. The show's "Shine a Light" campaign, in which on-air personalities champion causes, chose Baltimore in part because of the city's high rates of diabetes, obesity and residents who smoke.
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NEWS
September 21, 2003
Did you know... Raking leaves for 30 minutes burns about 150 calories. -- Surgeon General
HEALTH
By Georgia Carroll and By Georgia Carroll | May 29, 2014
The American Fitness Index has ranked Baltimore 25th of the 50 largest metropolitan areas in terms of overall fitness. The annual index measures city health based on preventative health behaviors, levels of chronic disease, access to healthcare and community resources and policies that support physical activity. Washington, D.C., placed highest, while Memphis, Tenn., was ranked last on the AFI, which was established in 2008 by the American College of Sports Medicine and the WellPoint Foundation.
HEALTH
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
For three hours each work week, Bert Rice walks laps around Burba Lake at Fort Meade - part of a mission by the federal government to build a healthier workforce. Rice, 76, a retired Army colonel and former Anne Arundel County councilman working as a civilian on the garrison staff at Fort Meade, is one of thousands of federal workers who participate in health and fitness programs designed to lower the government's health care costs, increase productivity and better recruit and retain employees.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2009
Electronics store Best Buy said Wednesday that it is expanding into the health and fitness market. The retailer is now selling treadmills, ellipticals, pedometers, heart rate watches and other items at 40 stores, including a store in Bel Air in Maryland. Best Buy's Geek Squad will help consumers meld technology with fitness equipment. For instance, they can help add surround sound to a home gym or download workout data to a home computer. - Andrea K. Walker
NEWS
By Arnesa Howell and Arnesa Howell,Special to the Sun | April 1, 2007
It's four months into the new year and many dieters are still trying to satisfy their New Year's resolution to take off the pounds. But by now it should be easy to stay with the routine of eating right, exercising and getting enough rest, right? Well, not exactly. With growing demands at work and home, experts say, it's hard for lots of people to keep pace with their frantic lives and still eat healthy. Nutritionist Dr. Rovenia Brock, author of Dr. Ro's Ten Secrets to Livin' Healthy, and fitness trainer Charles Harris, owner of Chizel-It!
NEWS
By Bloomberg News | September 8, 2006
Five simple health tips may help prevent 62 percent of fatal cardiac events and heart attacks suffered by men, researchers said. Men shouldn't smoke, become overweight under U.S. standards or have more than two alcoholic drinks a day, the study said. They should exercise at least 30 minutes daily, and follow federal food pyramid guidelines when they eat. "A healthy lifestyle, defined by these five factors, is associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease, even when men are taking medication to lower their blood pressure or cholesterol," said lead author Stephanie Chiuve, a research fellow at Harvard School of Public Health's Department of Nutrition.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 2006
In the pantheon of wacky fitness contraptions, the Power Plate deserves a place of honor. The pulsating, vibrating exercise machine promises to jiggle even the semi-indolent into shape without so much as a lunge or squat. In the four years since its introduction in the United States, the device has struck a responsive chord among slackers and elite athletes alike. Madonna reportedly used it to whip her 48-year-old body into its current Mighty Mouse condition. A gaggle of other celebrities and models - such as Sean "Diddy" Combs and Heidi Klum - unofficially have been linked to it. An increasing number of gyms and trainers report using them: More than 20,000 of the machines have been sold worldwide since 2002.
NEWS
By ALICIA ROCKMORE AND SARAH WELCH and ALICIA ROCKMORE AND SARAH WELCH,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 21, 2006
How many times have you shown up for a doctor's appointment and been handed a stack of multicolored double-sided forms to fill out? You scan the information and realize that you don't remember when you had your tonsils out or the name of the medicine that caused you to break out in hives five years ago. Having complete and accurate records for everyone in your family isn't just a nice thing to have, it's essential. The good news is that getting them in order is a straightforward organizational task.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
This week, joggers across the country can begin tracking the pace and distance of their runs through a chip in their sneakers that talks to their iPods - the latest high-tech gizmo to help Americans get and stay in shape. Glenn Baker is already a believer in melding fitness and technology. He used a diet and exercise program on his Treo smart phone to shed 13 pounds for his brother's wedding. And triathlete Phil Leigh follows a workout regime he receives daily from his coach via the Internet.
NEWS
By KAREN HELLER and KAREN HELLER,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | July 5, 2006
Diets, for the most part, don't work. The diet industry, however, does, voraciously consuming almost $50 billion a year, exclusive of celery. If diets worked, people wouldn't be on them for decades at a time, abandoning one to embrace another, caroming from grapefruit to bacon, and they would accept the fact that one simple regimen works: Eat less, exercise more, end of story - and fat. However, this doesn't stop diet books from popping up with frightening...
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