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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Bernice Troy, a geriatric nursing assistant in Baltimore for the past 20 years, has been spat on and cursed, scratched and punched on the job. A patient once slammed Jo Samrow, a nurse in Southern Maryland, into a wall so violently that she developed a large hematoma on the back of her head. In recent weeks, these nurses and other health care workers have shared their stories before lawmakers in Annapolis with one goal in mind — reducing assaults in Maryland health care facilities.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Bernice Troy, a geriatric nursing assistant in Baltimore for the past 20 years, has been spat on and cursed, scratched and punched on the job. A patient once slammed Jo Samrow, a nurse in Southern Maryland, into a wall so violently that she developed a large hematoma on the back of her head. In recent weeks, these nurses and other health care workers have shared their stories before lawmakers in Annapolis with one goal in mind — reducing assaults in Maryland health care facilities.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | June 5, 2007
The Baltimore County Council approved last night the hiring of a company to transport Medicaid recipients to doctor's offices and other health facilities. The contract, approved unanimously, stipulates that the county will pay TransCare Maryland Inc. up to $6.81 million over five years to provide transportation via ambulances and vans to county residents who need such services. Also last night, the council voted unanimously to designate June 10 as Rachel Carson Day, in honor of the late environmental pioneer and author who studied the impact of pesticides such as DDT.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | February 29, 2012
A newly renovated health center at Tench Tilghman Elementary and Middle School in Baltimore has reopened to students and will include a doctor onsite once a week The health st uite will
NEWS
January 12, 1992
Name: Sandra Tarutis MartinHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Being chosen first woman president of Health Facilities Associationof MarylandAge: 40Residence; hometown: HampsteadEducation: Bachelor of science degree in nursing from the University of Maryland, 1974; Board of Nursing Home Administrator's certificationFamily: Husband: Lee, 47, physical plant manager at Long View Nursing Home; daughters: Tamara, 16, a North Carroll High School junior, and...
BUSINESS
By MARK GUIDERA and MARK GUIDERA,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Helix Health, which manages four hospitals and a range of other medical services in the Baltimore region, agreed yesterday to form a partnership with a Washington-based group that effectively creates one of the largest health care systems in the country.The deal between Helix Health and the Medlantic Healthcare Group is considered to be further evidence of changes afoot in how medical care in the United States is managed so that insurance rates and the money patients pay out of their own pockets can be better controlled.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Ray Long and Bruce Japsen and Ray Long,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 24, 2004
The Bush administration recommended yesterday the elimination of state approvals for hospital construction and expansion, saying the process does not effectively control health care costs and, in fact, poses "serious anti-competitive risks." In a much-anticipated report on health care competition, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department said so-called "certificate of need" laws should be reconsidered. The Illinois Health Facilities Planning Board implements the state's version of the law, certifying the need for hospital expansion and some equipment purchases.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
An international relief organization based in Carroll County has re-established primary health care, battled disease and built basic infrastructure that will help ensure the health of nearly 8 million people in the remotest areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo. IMA World Health, headquartered in New Windsor, has released the results of its four-year project in the central African country, an effort funded with more than $40 million in U.S. aid. According to the group, the project trained more than 33,000 native health care workers, vaccinated nearly 1 million children and delivered treatment that has saved countless lives.
NEWS
By Alain Damiba and Alain Damiba,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
I grew up in the early 1960s in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Burkina Faso is a small, landlocked country with a population of less than 14 million, most of who are poor. Life expectancy for men and women is 48 years because of the lack of health care. This is especially the case for women who die during or after giving birth. As a young man, I remember hearing about women in my village who died during labor. Their deaths were not discussed publicly. All we were told was that it was God's will and that we should accept these tragic events as an inescapable part of life.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 2, 1990
The officers and directors of the Health Facilities Association of Maryland, the state's primary trade association for nursing homes, met all day and into the night Tuesday to address what they say is a threat to the quality of care of their patients and the financial viability of their members.The association, which includes 140 of the 220 private nursing homes in Maryland, was reacting to the budget cuts announced last month by the Schaefer administration. On an annual basis, the cuts will reduce state Medicaid payments to the industry by $10.4 million.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
Ruxton residents might not have the law on their side in trying to thwart plans for a high-end mental health rehabilitation center in their neighborhood, but that won't stop them from putting up a fight. Though Sheppard Pratt Medical Systems' proposal is protected by federal and state housing laws, according to experts, residents are exploring other options to halt the Towson-based hospital's effort to convert a six-bedroom house on Labelle Avenue into a facility for patients undergoing treatment for issues such as depression and anxiety.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
An international relief organization based in Carroll County has re-established primary health care, battled disease and built basic infrastructure that will help ensure the health of nearly 8 million people in the remotest areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo. IMA World Health, headquartered in New Windsor, has released the results of its four-year project in the central African country, an effort funded with more than $40 million in U.S. aid. According to the group, the project trained more than 33,000 native health care workers, vaccinated nearly 1 million children and delivered treatment that has saved countless lives.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
D'Lana Simmons was found "not criminally responsible" on Tuesday for the beating death of her 66-year-old aunt last year, using the steering wheel locking device known as "The Club" as a murder weapon. "This was a clear case of somebody who was psychotic," Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Gale E. Rasin said, reading from a doctor's report on Simmons' mental status. Simmons struck her aunt, Cecelia Mitchell, approximately 56 times on the evening of Sept. 17, then called 911 for help "stating that she had hurt her aunt and that [the woman]
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 23, 2010
The East Baltimore Development Inc. community will gain a prestigious new occupant - and about 250 jobs - when the state of Maryland builds a $180 million Public Health Laboratory there, officials said. Maryland's Board of Public Works this week approved $6.45 million in state funds to begin designing a 200,000-square-foot laboratory building to house state employees who now work at 201 W. Preston St., part of the State Office Complex in Baltimore. The building will be one of the next major projects to get under way on the East Baltimore property, an 88-acre tract north of the Johns Hopkins medical campus that is being developed as a $1.8 billion mixed-use community with housing, shops, offices, life science facilities, a school and a rail station.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | June 5, 2007
The Baltimore County Council approved last night the hiring of a company to transport Medicaid recipients to doctor's offices and other health facilities. The contract, approved unanimously, stipulates that the county will pay TransCare Maryland Inc. up to $6.81 million over five years to provide transportation via ambulances and vans to county residents who need such services. Also last night, the council voted unanimously to designate June 10 as Rachel Carson Day, in honor of the late environmental pioneer and author who studied the impact of pesticides such as DDT.
NEWS
By Alain Damiba and Alain Damiba,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
I grew up in the early 1960s in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Burkina Faso is a small, landlocked country with a population of less than 14 million, most of who are poor. Life expectancy for men and women is 48 years because of the lack of health care. This is especially the case for women who die during or after giving birth. As a young man, I remember hearing about women in my village who died during labor. Their deaths were not discussed publicly. All we were told was that it was God's will and that we should accept these tragic events as an inescapable part of life.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Maryland's top health official proposed yesterday to shrink the state's mental health system by closing the 90-year-old Crownsville Hospital Center in Anne Arundel County and privatizing the Walter P. Carter Center in downtown Baltimore. Shutting Crownsville would force the state to relocate its 200 patients to other facilities and could prompt about 150 layoffs, according to a report by Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini. It would also save $5.3 million per year for a state facing an $800 million shortfall next budget year.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
The nation's largest physician-practice management company focusing on occupational health care has come to Maryland.This morning officials from Concentra Medical Centers will announce their plan to operate a total of 12 health care facilities in the state.Concentra recently bought nine local occupational health facilities, which employ 200 workers. The company will open three additional centers with 150 employees."It's the best thing for the employees, the employers and the state of Maryland, because we reduce the costs of occupational health care anywhere from 30 to 70 percent, and that makes Maryland more competitive for business," said Tom Ward, vice president for operations for the eastern region of OccuSystems Inc., Concentra's parent company.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | March 15, 2007
A mental health facility for youths on the Eastern Shore that nearly lost its state license for inappropriate use of restraints and seclusion, among other problems, has a new owner, a new name and a new philosophy, changes that are being praised by the state officials who came close to shutting the center down last year. Under new owner Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System of Rockville, staff members at the former Chesapeake Youth Center, a residential treatment center in Cambridge, are no longer permitted to use leather restraints and must work with patients to avoid seclusion, said Marie McBee, the facility's vice president.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
Howard County General Hospital is a typical suburban facility, its administrators proud to be known for the cozy maternity suites, the cancer support programs and sophisticated technology. But they're not so happy about the kind of publicity the hospital has faced in recent weeks: a midnight brawl in the emergency room that ended in three arrests and three injuries; a suspect awaiting drug charges who slipped out and remains at large. While rare, such incidents have unnerved patients and staff and highlighted the fact that once-sleepy suburban hospitals - like neighboring shopping malls and schools - now have to cope with complex crime and security issues.
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