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By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1997
GREENVILLE, N.C. -- They arrived at the East Carolina University medical school here yesterday, cloaked in official anonymity, like the jurors in a celebrated criminal case.But the people who underwent six hours of testing yesterday, and the others who will come here next Saturday, aren't being asked to pass judgment.These 60 people are acting as witnesses against single-celled organisms, including Pfiesteria piscicida, the fish-killing microbe accused but not convicted of having made people ill along the tidal rivers that vein North Carolina's coast.
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NEWS
July 30, 2014
I was surprised to see in Tim Wheeler 's report on the latest Cove Point permit ( "State gives gas export facility go-ahead," July 23) that Gov. Martin O'Malley has decided that fracked gas is a bridge fuel and that fracking can be done safely if the government sets the "highest and best" standards. How has the governor reached that conclusion before having seen the report from his own Marcellus Shale advisory commission? His 2011 executive order instructed the panel to determine whether and how fracking could be done without unacceptable risks to health, safety and the environment.
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NEWS
By D. Quentin Wilber and Jonathan Bor and D. Quentin Wilber and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
OCEAN CITY -- While Maryland officials briefed the state's doctors yesterday on the microorganism that has killed fish and apparently sickened people, a federal agency was asking representatives of Atlantic seaboard states to join in learning more about the health effects.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta ++ plans to convene a workshop where officials from coastal states will share information about the toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida, or related organisms.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
When the Sparrows Point steel mill closed, Deborah S. Barkley felt sorry for the laid-off workers - she didn't want that to happen. But she knew her life would get better. For 20 years, she's lived less than a mile from the Baltimore County plant. Until the facility shut down last summer, she said, silvery black grit and dust from steelmaking - known as kish - regularly blew in or rained down onto her family's yard, was tracked onto the carpets and corroded the exterior of the house.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
A scientific panel recommended yesterday that the Environmental Protection Agency increase funding for research into particulate matter, a pollutant in dust, smoke and soot that is widely viewed as a major factor in heart and lung disorders. The National Academy of Sciences said more research is crucial because the EPA is updating its standards on particulate matter - which is generated by cars, power plants and other sources. "We know a lot about the health effects, but in terms of regulations, we still have a lot of work to do," said Dr. Jonathan Samet, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and chairman of the panel that issued the report.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Nine pilots from the 103rd Fighter Wing of the Connecticut Air National Guard -- about 25 percent of its combat-ready fighter force -- have resigned from flying duties rather than take the Pentagon's mandatory anthrax vaccinations, saying they have concerns about possible health effects and question its value as a defense against the biological weapon.All nine of the citizen soldiers, mid-level officers and veterans of Desert Storm, Bosnia and the Iraqi "no-fly" zones, left the reserve unit during the past month, said unit members.
NEWS
June 12, 1998
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun quoted a spokesman of the Maryland Department of the Environment as saying that smoke from a Clarksville dump fire has created an unhealthy situation. The department stated yesterday that the health effects of the fire cannot be determined unless information on the concentration of the pollutants and duration of people's exposure to them is professionally evaluated.Pub Date: 6/12/98
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
State officials cautioned Friday against swimming, water skiing or other activities in a portion of the Potomac River and one of its tributary because of a harmful algae bloom there. Elevated levels of mycrocystis, a blue-green algae, have been reported in the Potomac south of Mattawoman Creek and in the mouth of the creek itself, according to state health and natural resources officials. Blue-green algae, which often turn the water bright green, produce a toxin that can irritate the skin on contact or cause nausea and other ill health effects if swallowed.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
When the Sparrows Point steel mill closed, Deborah S. Barkley felt sorry for the laid-off workers - she didn't want that to happen. But she knew her life would get better. For 20 years, she's lived less than a mile from the Baltimore County plant. Until the facility shut down last summer, she said, silvery black grit and dust from steelmaking - known as kish - regularly blew in or rained down onto her family's yard, was tracked onto the carpets and corroded the exterior of the house.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
State officials cautioned Friday against swimming, water skiing or other activities in a portion of the Potomac River and one of its tributary because of a harmful algae bloom there. Elevated levels of mycrocystis, a blue-green algae, have been reported in the Potomac south of Mattawoman Creek and in the mouth of the creek itself, according to state health and natural resources officials. Blue-green algae, which often turn the water bright green, produce a toxin that can irritate the skin on contact or cause nausea and other ill health effects if swallowed.
FEATURES
By Sandi Doughton and Sandi Doughton,McClatchy-Tribune | July 24, 2008
The fumes that waft from top-selling air fresheners and laundry products contain dozens of chemicals, including several classified as toxic or hazardous, says a University of Washington study published yesterday. None of the chemicals was listed on product labels, nor does the federal government require companies to disclose ingredients in fragrances, said study author Anne Steinemann. "I was surprised by both the number and the potential toxicity of the chemicals that were found," said Steinemann, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and public affairs.
NEWS
By Luis Perez and Luis Perez,NEWSDAY | September 6, 2006
NEW YORK -- Five years after Sept. 11, seven of 10 first-responders and workers who toiled at Ground Zero suffer from chronic lung ailments that probably will last the rest of their lives, doctors said yesterday in announcing the largest-ever study of health effects of the attacks. The study of nearly 9,500 police officers, paramedics, construction workers and others by physicians at Mount Sinai Medical Center offers the first scientific evidence linking Ground Zero dust and debris to those health problems, vindicating doctors and patients who for years had said the connection was undeniable.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 3, 2006
Should I throw away my toothbrush after I've had a cold? No. Nor should you waste your money on commercially available toothbrush "sanitizers" or special mouthwashes or disinfecting solutions. Thoroughly rinsing the toothbrush with tap water "does remove most of what's caught there," said Dr. Dana Graves, a professor of periodontology and oral biology at the Boston University School of Dental Medicine. And leaving the brush uncovered so it can dry between uses or using a toothpaste containing a disinfectant also helps reduce the amount of live bacteria and viruses on the brush.
NEWS
June 6, 1994
The experience of Keystone Landfill, located 600 yards over the Carroll County border in Pennsylvania, underlines the fact that listing as a national Superfund cleanup site does not guarantee speedy government action. It's also an example of how public fears may be unnecessarily magnified by the mere listing of a dump on the list.Keystone was placed on the Environmental Protection Agency's priority list in 1987 and closed in 1990, but pollution studies of properties around the toxic waste dump have yet to get under way.Claims by two neighboring landowners that their ground water was contaminated by the privately owned landfill were dismissed earlier this year by a federal judge.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
NEWS
By Charles Piller and Alissa J. Rubin and Charles Piller and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
VIENNA, Austria - Nearly two decades after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster spread radioactive fallout across much of Europe, a United Nations study has concluded that the health effects have been far less extensive than feared. The researchers confirmed 56 deaths, nine children who died of thyroid cancer and 47 emergency workers who died of acute radiation poisoning or radiation-induced cancer. They projected that 3,940 more people will die of cancer, according to the report released yesterday.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
A scientific panel recommended yesterday that the Environmental Protection Agency increase funding for research into particulate matter, a pollutant in dust, smoke and soot that is widely viewed as a major factor in heart and lung disorders. The National Academy of Sciences said more research is crucial because the EPA is updating its standards on particulate matter - which is generated by cars, power plants and other sources. "We know a lot about the health effects, but in terms of regulations, we still have a lot of work to do," said Dr. Jonathan Samet, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and chairman of the panel that issued the report.
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