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By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
The surgery on Don Hayden's son was successful. The only lingering complication: a bill for $23,000. The Gaithersburg family, surprised that insurance didn't cover the cost, spent about a year fighting the charge from the medical clinic — even after it was reduced to $16,000. The clinic turned the bill over to a collection agency, and the Haydens prepared to hire a lawyer. That's when an administrative worker at the clinic advised the family in a whisper to contact Maryland's Health Education and Advocacy Unit, which mediates such disputes on behalf of consumers.
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By Michael Dresser | December 3, 2013
The Maryland Republican Party may have a prospect to run for attorney general in 2014, possibly giving it a candidate for an office it left uncontested in 2010. Richard Douglas, a lawyer, businessman and Iraq veteran, released a statement Tuesday in which he said he's considering a try for that office. If he gets in the GOP would field a full slate of candidates for statewide office is Democratic-dominated Maryland. Douglas said he is truly undecided about making a run, not announcing an intent to announce as some gubernatorial candidates have done.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1994
As Carroll County General Hospital's community education coordinator, Fran Miller's goal is to keep people out of the hospital.Mrs. Miller coordinates the hospital's public health education programs, organizes an annual countywide health fair and offers one-on-one instruction to diabetic patients on how to manage their illness at home.The 33-year hospital employee was honored for her work last week by the Maryland Nurses Association, which named her one of the three outstanding nurses of 1994 in the Baltimore metropolitan area.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 29, 2013
As has long been his practice, Del. Pat McDonough, who represents Western Harford in the Maryland House of Delegates, recently made some rather prescient observations about education policy in Maryland and across the U.S. and then took the opportunity to make political hay out of a bad situation. In a letter to the editor published Friday, Del. McDonough quoted Baltimore County Superintendent Dallas Dance when he described the process by which Maryland's Common Core curriculum is being implemented: "We are building the plane as we fly it. " McDonough rightly went on to criticize Harford's neighbor county for having been the place where a critic of the Common Core was arrested for speaking out against the program during a public hearing.
NEWS
November 25, 2008
For years, Baltimore's Health Education Resource Organization, known as HERO, was one of the most active, best-funded clinical support groups for people with HIV/AIDS in the country. It provided counseling, medical care, a place to gather and a sympathetic ear to patients who often had nowhere else to turn at a time when AIDS was poorly understood and its victims often stigmatized as unworthy of help. That's why past and present HERO clients are shocked and saddened by news that the group is preparing to end its 25-year mission of mercy in a city with at least 16,000 cases.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
The bookshelf in Kristine Holmes' office reflects her career path. Healing Prayer and To Forgive Is Human share space with Trauma and Recovery and The Nursing Drug Reference. After 25 years as an emergency and trauma nurse, Holmes entered the burgeoning field of parish nursing, which seeks to integrate the role of faith in health and healing. Since she became a full-time parish nurse in 1999 at First Presbyterian Church of Howard County in Columbia, Holmes has worked to introduce the concept to other faith communities in the county.
NEWS
October 22, 2006
The 50+ Expo Friday drew more than 140 exhibitors. It also offered educa tional seminars, entertainment and a live auction to benefit needy seniors in Howard County. A health fair offered screenings and health education, and an alternative care fair explored other treatment methods.
NEWS
October 25, 2005
Baltimore BCCC Liberty campus Dental clinic offers free care Baltimore City Community Colleges dental clinic is offering free preventive care this week as part of National Dental Hygiene Month. Those ages 62 and older, regardless of income, can receive free oral exams, X-rays, cleaning, fluoride treatments and health education. Morning and afternoon appointments are available at the colleges Liberty Campus. Information or appointments: 410-462-7712.
NEWS
October 26, 1990
Robert B. Mancke, a senior health educator with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 47 and lived on Eutaw Place.A memorial service for Mr. Mancke was being held today at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1316 Park Ave.He had worked for the state since last year after serving since 1975 as director of the Bureau of Health Education and Promotion for the Baltimore Health Department.Before coming to the city, he held a similar post in Prince George's County for three years after starting in health education work with the state in 1967.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
The Carroll County school system will be one administrator short for at least the rest of this year, with two supervisors picking up the duties of David Miller, who left as head of vocational and technology education for a post in Frederick County.Superintendent R. Edward Shilling told the Board of Education yesterday that he decided not to replace Mr. Miller because of expected reductions of $2.5 million to $3.8 million in money coming from the state.Marjorie Lohnes, formerly supervisor of home economics and health education, will continue to supervise home economics and add most of Mr. Miller's duties to her work load.
EXPLORE
By Zack Newman and By Zack Newman | November 30, 2012
Athena Kan, a sophomore at River Hill High School, did not have to look very far to learn the values of volunteering. Her parents, Kenny and Henrietta, are largely responsible for Athena's volunteering spirit. The family has participated in American Heart Association walks in Howard County and Baltimore for years. "When life gets hectic, we find that volunteering as a family is a powerful way to strengthen family life with a beneficial purpose," Kenny said. Athena, 14, was named the Howard County Youth Volunteer of the Year last month for her involvement with a number of charities, including a foundation she and her sister, Tiffany, started last year - Coalition Halting Obesity in Children Everywhere.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
The surgery on Don Hayden's son was successful. The only lingering complication: a bill for $23,000. The Gaithersburg family, surprised that insurance didn't cover the cost, spent about a year fighting the charge from the medical clinic — even after it was reduced to $16,000. The clinic turned the bill over to a collection agency, and the Haydens prepared to hire a lawyer. That's when an administrative worker at the clinic advised the family in a whisper to contact Maryland's Health Education and Advocacy Unit, which mediates such disputes on behalf of consumers.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Six candidates for Baltimore mayor sounded off on education, drug addiction, vacant homes and job creation at a Tuesday night forum sponsored by a coalition of nearly three dozen advocacy groups. Speaking before a spirited standing room crowd of about 500 people, including many youth, candidates Clerk of Court Frank M. Conaway Sr., education activist Vicki Ann Harding, former City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers, state Sen. Catherine Pugh, former city planning director Otis Rolley and nurse Wilton Wilson, hashed out their platforms for more than three hours.
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
WESTMINSTER - State and local officials from Carroll, Frederick and Howard community colleges are scheduled to attend a ground breaking ceremony on Monday, July 25, for the new Mount Airy College Center for Health Care Education. The center is located at 1712 Back Acre Circle in Mount Airy. The three colleges are building on an existing academic agreement to provide additional student access to workforce education programs. The center, which is expected to open in the fall 2012, will provide health-care related programs.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | February 1, 2011
National health care reform is on the minds of Americans, and whether one agrees with the new laws or not, the debate continues to stimulate discussion on how Americans can be healthier. The bottom line? Being sick costs money - not just for the individual but for employers as well. “Seventy percent of doctors visits are related to lifestyle behaviors,” says Cheryl Walker, program manager for Health Coaching and Wellness Coaching at Tai Sophia Institute in North Laurel. “If we get people to change behaviors, we reduce health care costs.” Everyone knows the old saying “habits are hard to break.” What the public health professionals are finally recognizing is that health education is not enough, and they are now looking at a relationship-centered approach to improving health.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Pointing to stubbornly high teen birth rates, Baltimore officials, youth advocacy organizations and sex-education groups gathered Friday to announce a new strategy aimed at coordinating disjointed prevention efforts and filling geographic gaps in services to city teens. About 66 of every 1,000 babies born in Baltimore in 2007 were to teen mothers, almost double the statewide rate, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The rates were even higher for the city's African-American and Hispanic mothers.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Parents who oppose Anne Arundel County's middle school reading plan, which halves class time for electives, asked the State Board of Education on Friday to render a decision this week. The board will consider the parents' challenge to the reading plan in a closed session Tuesday, but is unlikely to reach an immediate decision, board spokesman Ron Peiffer said. "I believe they would not deliver an opinion on that until next month or possibly a month later," Peiffer said. That's not good news for the parents, who want the school schedule changed to allow more time for electives.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
If you've been putting off going to the doctor, you could go to Cranberry Mall.More than 50 area physicians and health care organizations will be there Saturday for the fifth annual Family Health Festival.Between shopping trips, you can have a diabetes screening, get your child immunized and pick up some diet tips from a nutritionist.The festival, open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., was organized by Carroll County General Hospital's health education coordinator, Fran Miller."I think it gives people an opportunity to check in on their health and have some fun," Ms. Miller said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Summer's almost over, your money's almost gone, and yet it feels like there's still so much left undone. What's a person to do? We can't help you with the money part. And much as we'd like to, there's no way to expand the calendar. But we can point out what you may not realize: There's plenty to do in and around Charm City in the waning days of summer, even with nary a penny in your pocket. Herewith, an itinerary for the thrifty, offering 50 no-cost activities to keep body and soul engaged over the next month or so. There's a lot to do, so get busy.
NEWS
March 21, 2010
Sponsored by the Learn to Live program of the Anne Arundel County Department of Health, educators will answer questions on nutrition and distribute free low-fat recipes. Graul's, 607 Taylor Ave., Annapolis: noon to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m to 3 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 28.
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