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By Roland J. Thorpe Jr | April 15, 2014
Nearly half a century has passed since Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said, "Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane. " Yet decades later, only modest progress has been made to reduce the pervasive racial and ethnic health disparities that exist in this country - and we don't have to look far to see the effects. According to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in 2010, African Americans represented 62 percent of adults and adolescents living in Baltimore City, yet they accounted for 85 percent of HIV cases.
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
Nearly 10,000 people in West Baltimore are diagnosed each year with new cases of diabetes, hypertension and other treatable, chronic health conditions — enough to fill 24 jumbo jets. These illnesses will kill many of them and complications will disable others who may end up in wheelchairs or have limbs amputated because they didn't get the proper medical care. This is the evidence the West Baltimore Primary Care Access Collaborative, a coalition of 16 hospitals and nonprofit organizations, gave state health officials as they sought to join a state program that provides financial incentives in an effort to curb health disparities in the state through the creation of special zones.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joined Ravens players Jacoby Jones and Justin Tucker and crowds of local children for a workout at M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday - and it was broadcast on national television. The crowd was challenged to run up and down 10,000 of the stadium's steps, part of a yearlong campaign to promote health and fitness in Baltimore on NBC's "Today" show. The show's "Shine a Light" campaign, in which on-air personalities champion causes, chose Baltimore in part because of the city's high rates of diabetes, obesity and residents who smoke.
HEALTH
January 22, 2014
Black and Hispanic men are shouldering more medical costs because of health inequalities and they, their families and society are suffering from the burden, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Health disparities among African American men and Hispanic men cost the economy more than $450 billion between 2006 and 2009, the study found. Black men incurred about three quarters of the costs. The study, published in the International Journal of Men's Health, incorporated the direct cost of medical care and the indirect costs such as lower productivity and early death among black, Hispanic, Asian and white men. "These stark findings underscore the fact that we can't afford to overlook men's health disparities that exist in this country," Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., lead author of the study and assistant professor at Hopkins and director of the Program for Research on Men's Health in the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
In response to your editorial about programs in Baltimore's Oliver neighborhood, I would like to highlight the efforts of Baltimore HELPS (Healthy Eating Leading Partnerships for Seniors), an initiative being led by Medicare's Quality Improvement Organization in Maryland ("Fixing Oliver," March 13). As noted in the editorial, there is wide variation in life expectancy in the city. In fact, life expectancy in the Oliver neighborhood is approximately 20 years less than other areas in the city.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Many Latinos in Baltimore lack medical coverage, which contributes to problems such as fewer mothers getting prenatal care, according to a new report that takes the first comprehensive look at the group's health. The report, released Thursday by the city Health Department, compiled data from the U.S. Census, state health records and a survey of Latino residents to assess the needs of a rapidly growing group that is often left out of the health system. The study found Latinos, with limited access to medical care, often rely on community clinics.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Why do some people get sicker and die sooner than others? The answer involves more than our genes, behaviors and medical care, according to a new study by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the advocacy group Equity Inc. It turns out that where we live is often the strongest predictor of our well-being, and that disparities along racial and class lines in health outcomes and access to care mirror the inequities in every other aspect...
NEWS
April 19, 2014
Reducing health disparities is not for the faint-hearted ( "Health disparities persist today," April 16). These are complex and complicated medical, social, environmental, behavioral and political issues that get intertwined. One of the reasons health disparities persist is because of the lack of bold and courageous African American and Latino physician leadership. Yes, there are experts of all colors who give technologically brilliant PowerPoint presentations. But that is not what is needed to create the transformational societal change that must take place to reduce health disparities.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore | June 23, 2011
The state has assembled a work group of top health professionals to come up with ways to reduce health disparities among racial and ethnic groups, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown announced Thursday. The seven-member panel, to be headed by Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, will identify new legislation and financial incentives that can be used to bring equality to healthcare. While studies have shown the overall life expectancy in the United States has improved, there are still large differences between the health of minorities and that of whites.
NEWS
April 19, 2014
Reducing health disparities is not for the faint-hearted ( "Health disparities persist today," April 16). These are complex and complicated medical, social, environmental, behavioral and political issues that get intertwined. One of the reasons health disparities persist is because of the lack of bold and courageous African American and Latino physician leadership. Yes, there are experts of all colors who give technologically brilliant PowerPoint presentations. But that is not what is needed to create the transformational societal change that must take place to reduce health disparities.
NEWS
By Roland J. Thorpe Jr | April 15, 2014
Nearly half a century has passed since Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said, "Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane. " Yet decades later, only modest progress has been made to reduce the pervasive racial and ethnic health disparities that exist in this country - and we don't have to look far to see the effects. According to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in 2010, African Americans represented 62 percent of adults and adolescents living in Baltimore City, yet they accounted for 85 percent of HIV cases.
HEALTH
January 22, 2014
Black and Hispanic men are shouldering more medical costs because of health inequalities and they, their families and society are suffering from the burden, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Health disparities among African American men and Hispanic men cost the economy more than $450 billion between 2006 and 2009, the study found. Black men incurred about three quarters of the costs. The study, published in the International Journal of Men's Health, incorporated the direct cost of medical care and the indirect costs such as lower productivity and early death among black, Hispanic, Asian and white men. "These stark findings underscore the fact that we can't afford to overlook men's health disparities that exist in this country," Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., lead author of the study and assistant professor at Hopkins and director of the Program for Research on Men's Health in the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and Bon Secours Baltimore Health System applaud the good work of the Baltimore City Health Department's initiative, Healthy Baltimore 2015. An alarming statistic, however, is the drastic increase in emergency room visits for diabetes and hypertension and the widening gap in racial disparities for this metric. Diabetes is twice as likely to affect African Americans and Hispanics as it is non-Hispanic whites, but as Dr. Oxiris Barbot states, where we live, work, learn and play also affect health outcomes to a large degree ("Baltimore is getting healthier, but still has a way to go," Oct. 21)
NEWS
September 12, 2013
We applaud the work of the public and nonprofit agencies that seek out uninsured Marylanders to enroll in health insurance programs ( "Maryland seeks uninsured to inform about health reform Sept. 7). Research shows that having insurance reduces health disparities and improves well-being. The lengths to which these folks must go shows again the folly of Obamacare. No other advanced nation has to find people who don't have insurance - because everyone has insurance. Each dollar spent in outreach and enrollment is diverted from the actual delivery of health care.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
In response to your editorial about programs in Baltimore's Oliver neighborhood, I would like to highlight the efforts of Baltimore HELPS (Healthy Eating Leading Partnerships for Seniors), an initiative being led by Medicare's Quality Improvement Organization in Maryland ("Fixing Oliver," March 13). As noted in the editorial, there is wide variation in life expectancy in the city. In fact, life expectancy in the Oliver neighborhood is approximately 20 years less than other areas in the city.
NEWS
By Thomas LaVeist and Daniel L. Howard | July 5, 2012
For the first time in history, slightly more than half of newborn Americans are people of color. It is projected that by 2050, the majority of Americans will be from minority populations. This demographic shift has serious implications on a myriad of fronts, especially for the nation's overall health. The unfortunate truth is that nonwhite populations as a whole live sicker and die younger than their white counterparts. And black populations tend to be among the sickest. But the racial health divide doesn't end at our shores.
NEWS
By Brian D. Smedley | June 8, 2010
Most parents would be dismayed to see their child come home with a "D" on their report card. They would want to know how they and the school can work together to improve the child's scholastic performance. With the announcement that the Baltimore City Health Department has given the very same grade to the city's efforts to reduce health inequities, will residents demand accountability, involvement and improvement? In a remarkable report, the agency reviewed trends regarding a number of health indicators of residents of the city and the state and found that Baltimore's inhabitants fared worse than the state on 13 of 14 indicators.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Commentator Harry Alford's claim that focusing on fracking legislation in Maryland constitutes a waste of time and effort suggests a shocking ignorance of what is happening in other states ("Anti-fracking legislation is premature," March 7). Maryland's proposed fracking bills are designed to create an orderly, safe process that states elsewhere have not achieved. How can the Black Chamber of Commerce claim to seek economic empowerment for African-American communities, yet support the natural gas industry?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
Nearly 10,000 people in West Baltimore are diagnosed each year with new cases of diabetes, hypertension and other treatable, chronic health conditions — enough to fill 24 jumbo jets. These illnesses will kill many of them and complications will disable others who may end up in wheelchairs or have limbs amputated because they didn't get the proper medical care. This is the evidence the West Baltimore Primary Care Access Collaborative, a coalition of 16 hospitals and nonprofit organizations, gave state health officials as they sought to join a state program that provides financial incentives in an effort to curb health disparities in the state through the creation of special zones.
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