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By Dr. Michelle A. Gourdine | October 22, 2003
AFRICAN-AMERICAN health is at a crisis point. Tens of thousands of African-Americans die each year from health problems that could be prevented, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. For decades, blacks have fought for equality. Progress has been made in decreasing social, economic, educational and political disparities. Unfortunately, the same strides have not been made in health. Despite notable gains in the overall health status of Americans in this century, a significant public health problem still remains: the racial disparity in health status between blacks and whites.
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NEWS
June 17, 2014
After last January's Columbia mall shootings – when Darion Marcus Aguilar, 19, entered a store and shot and killed employees Brianna Benlolo, 21, of College Park, and Tyler Johnson, 25, of Mount Airy, before taking his own life – there was an exhaustive effort to determine a motive. What Howard County police eventually found was that Aguilar had been searching online for resources to address mental isssues after having been urged to seek psychiatric help. What county and police officials also realized is the need to understand more and to have better training to deal with those issues.
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NEWS
September 28, 1998
PROMPT, sensible reaction to the threat of contagious hepatitis at an Eldersburg fast-food restaurant has calmed public fears and apparently averted a public health crisis.About 2,000 persons lined up at Springfield Hospital Center Thursday and Friday for free shots against the hepatitis A virus that attacks the liver. Carroll County health officials moved swiftly to set up the clinic, ordering 4,000 doses from a California supplier.There were no immediate reports of hepatitis A contracted by customers or current employees of the Eldersburg Wendy's.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Dr. Ruth H. Singer, a retired physician who was a state health administrator and later worked in AIDS and HIV treatment at Chase Brexton Health Services, died of pancreatic cancer May 27 at her North Baltimore home. She was 69. "What one loved about Ruth is that she never held back," said Dr. Alfred "Al" Sommer, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "If something was too soft and dreamy, she insisted on facing the practical nature of the course of action and hoped for an outcome.
NEWS
November 23, 2007
MERLE A. SANDE, 68 AIDS treatment pioneer Dr. Merle A. Sande, a leading infectious-diseases expert whose early recognition of the looming public health crisis posed by AIDS led to the development of basic protocols for how to handle infected patients, died Nov. 14 at his home in Seattle. The cause was multiple myeloma, his family said. In 1981, while chief of medical services at San Francisco General Hospital, Dr. Sande (pronounced SAN-dee) and his colleagues began to note an ominous incidence of young men being admitted with pneumonia, cancers and other serious illnesses, some of which defied easy diagnosis.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 16, 2001
CROSSROADS, South Africa - In this black township just east of Cape Town, no one doubts that AIDS has caused a health crisis. Every weekend, families go to cemeteries to bury victims of the disease. But at Crossroads Community Health Center, health workers are witnessing the first signs of what might be the nation's next health tragedy: heart disease. Each month, more men and women line up outside the clinic's iron gates seeking treatment for high blood pressure, one of the major risk factors leading to strokes and heart attacks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 2003
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Like other Sprint employees, Kent Turner has adjusted to the company's new office park here on a former soybean field in a suburb of Kansas City, but he wonders why the elevators are so pokey when the buildings are new. "We believe that it's a sinister plot to get us to take the stairs," he said. Sinister, no; plot, yes. Sprint planned its 200-acre world headquarters with an eye to fitness. It banned cars, forcing employees to park in garages on the far side of a road ringing the campus and walk between buildings as much as a half-mile apart.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
The devastation of losing a house to foreclosure can lead to depression and a host of other conditions, according to the authors of new study who warn of a looming national health crisis. They are advocating for a new unified approach by financial and mental health advisers to provide homeowners with aid. The study, led by a University of Maryland researcher, found that one in five people in default on their mortgages have serious symptoms of depression. About one-third have seen their finances so crimped that they cannot afford to fill prescriptions and get enough to eat, which worsen health problems.
NEWS
April 2, 2002
It's time for insurers to pay their share for mental health Jay Hancock blames mandated benefits for rising health insurance costs and, subsequently, for increasing the numbers of the uninsured ("Legislated health benefits cause loss of essential care," March 20). He specifically mentions mandated coverage of mental health crisis care as indicative of "well-intentioned" policy that "swells the legions of the uninsured." It's astounding that Mr. Hancock fails to mention the spiraling costs of pharmaceuticals or insurance company profit margins as contributing to rising costs.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It is possible to date precisely when health care reform made the critical transformation from public preoccupation to political priority: Nov. 5, 1991.That was the day Harris Wofford, an old-style liberal Democrat, got his marching orders from voters in Pennsylvania to deliver a message to Washington. The message in his own words: "We have a health crisis that is bankrupting workers, families, our companies, our whole economy."So clearly was it delivered by Mr. Wofford's upset U.S. Senate victory over high-profile Republican Richard L. Thornburgh, former U.S. attorney general and Pennsylvania governor, that President Bush took immediate notice and ordered his experts to produce a health care reform package.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 2, 2013
Apparently, if the secretary of state needs to take a sick day, she had better get a note from her doctor. A very "transparent" note, a very detailed note. With enough copies to send to her most vociferous critics. Hillary Rodham Clinton suffered a fall or a fainting spell in early December while recovering from a nasty flu that had left her dehydrated, and doctors said she had sustained a concussion as a result. Right away, conservative talking heads scoffed, saying she was faking it so she wouldn't have to appear before Congress and testify about what happened in Benghazi, Libya, where a U.S. ambassador and three other Americans died in what is now being described as an attack by terrorists linked to al-Qaida.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
The devastation of losing a house to foreclosure can lead to depression and a host of other conditions, according to the authors of new study who warn of a looming national health crisis. They are advocating for a new unified approach by financial and mental health advisers to provide homeowners with aid. The study, led by a University of Maryland researcher, found that one in five people in default on their mortgages have serious symptoms of depression. About one-third have seen their finances so crimped that they cannot afford to fill prescriptions and get enough to eat, which worsen health problems.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The state's reported progress in reducing infant mortality is to be cheered, but the fact that infant mortality increased slightly for African-Americans in 2009, and that a smaller percentage of black women received prenatal care that year, should be deeply troubling to public health officials. Persistent racial and class disparities in access to health care are the principal reasons Maryland's infant mortality rate — the number of infant deaths per thousand live births — has remained disturbingly high over the years.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
Nearly a generation after researchers isolated the HIV virus that causes AIDS, there is still no cure for the disease nor a vaccine to protect people from infection. But a new White House strategy to curb the spread of AIDS, and reports this week of an experimental gel that helps reduce the chances of transmitting the virus in women, offer hope that millions of lives can be saved over the next 20 years both in the U.S. and abroad. The president's plan builds on efforts begun during the Bush administration to encourage people to get tested for the virus and to seek treatment before symptoms appear.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
Even as aid trickled in Thursday to earthquake-ravaged Haiti - and estimates emerged of as many as 50,000 dead and countless more gravely injured - experts feared the country was on the brink of a public health disaster that could persist for months. While relief workers hoped to provide food and water and to confront the most pressing of immediate medical needs, from antibiotics to bandages, disaster response experts say what remains ahead could be equally daunting: rebuilding from scratch a public health system that was fragile at best before disaster struck.
NEWS
August 28, 2009
There is now little doubt the nation will experience a widespread -and perhaps severe - outbreak of the H1N1 virus this fall, traditionally the flu season in the Northern Hemisphere. Experts are still uncertain how virulent this particular flu strain, which has been circulating through the Southern Hemisphere in recent months, will be when it comes back our way, and they are monitoring it carefully for mutations that might render it more deadly. So far, there's no indication of that; according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, although H1N1 does spread easily, it remains a relatively mild strain of influenza.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | August 18, 2007
It's Wednesday night, and about a dozen members of the McElderry Park Community Association are meeting at the organization's refurbished North Montford Avenue center. It's business as usual as the group votes in additional board members and then turns its attention to the night's agenda: the upcoming Amazing Port Street celebration, recruiting volunteers to organize a book club for local kids, cleaning the alleys of trash and promoting next month's fundraising fish fry. A block away, past a check-cashing store, the tax man, a laundromat, clothes boutique and ice cream parlor, three police cars with lights flashing are parked at Monument and North Milton.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
After last January's Columbia mall shootings – when Darion Marcus Aguilar, 19, entered a store and shot and killed employees Brianna Benlolo, 21, of College Park, and Tyler Johnson, 25, of Mount Airy, before taking his own life – there was an exhaustive effort to determine a motive. What Howard County police eventually found was that Aguilar had been searching online for resources to address mental isssues after having been urged to seek psychiatric help. What county and police officials also realized is the need to understand more and to have better training to deal with those issues.
NEWS
December 1, 2008
Reya Johnson sat in her living room with her 15-month-old daughter Andrea, a bright-eyed child who couldn't stop smiling. They sang nursery rhymes and played pitty-pat, tapping their palms lightly together. Ms. Johnson, 38, was showing Peggy White, a caseworker from Baltimore's Healthy Start initiative, the progress Andrea had made since her last visit. Healthy Start helps pregnant women and new mothers with counseling, medical care and other services. Ms. White watched as Andrea eagerly pretended to read a colorful brochure and recited rhymes with her mother.
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