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NEWS
March 9, 2008
Medicare and Medicaid cost $627 billion last year - almost a quarter of all federal spending. That amount is expected to double within 10 years as baby boomers overwhelm the Medicare program. Yet you won't hear much on this subject from Sens. Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and John McCain. They fear discussing it because all the conventional choices for reining in the cost of these programs are unpleasant. They include limiting care, raising taxes, reducing payments to providers and asking wealthier beneficiaries to pay more.
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NEWS
By Rebecca Ruggles | September 17, 2014
The shelving of a plan to build a new CSX rail facility in the West Baltimore residential neighborhood of Morrell Park was decried recently as a setback for regional job growth and a sign of failed leadership by CSX. But articles in The Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore Business Journal omitted mention of the successful leadership of health advocates and community members who insisted that specific health consequences of the planned facility be addressed....
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
There's a good chance during open enrollment this fall that you will be offered a high-deductible insurance plan with a savings account - if you haven't already been nudged into one. Increasingly, employers are offering this as a way to rein in their health insurance costs. The high deductible means lower premiums, benefits experts say. And employees - confronted with the prospect of potentially paying thousands of dollars before insurance kicks in - are less likely to run to the emergency room for minor problems, which also keeps costs down.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on Howard County's effort to limit sales of unhealthy foods at county-sponsored events or venues, it's quite apparent that you do not understand our fundamental rights under the Constitution ( "Fireworks in Howard County," July 7). Our Founding Fathers declared independence from tyranny. Might I suggest watching the John Adams series on HBO? It's very educational. The president's ridiculous "executive orders" are simply the government acting as a dictatorship.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | September 2, 1991
Seattle. - Rarely have the nation's governors exhibited the collective outrage, frustration and resolve to rouse a somnolent federal government as they did in debating health care at their annual meeting here recently.''What you saw . . . was a controlled explosion of anger,'' said Washington's Booth Gardner, the National Governors' Association's outgoing chairman. ''Now,'' he predicted, ''you'll see a chain reaction throughout the states as we mobilize to address health reform. And we believe this will translate into action at the federal level.
NEWS
By Daniel Costello and Daniel Costello,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 2005
Employers have recently tried every carrot they can think of - including cash incentives and iPods - to persuade employees to quit smoking. Now they are trying the stick. Pointing to rising health costs - and the oversized proportion of insurance claims attributed to smokers - employers around the country are refusing to hire applicants who smoke and, sometimes, firing employees who refuse to quit. "Employers are realizing the majority of health costs are spent on a small minority of workers," said Bill Whitmer, chief executive of the Health Enhancement Research Organization, a health care and employer coalition in Birmingham, Ala. Federal and state laws bar employers from not hiring or from firing workers based on their race, religion or sex. Some states have enacted laws offering similar protections for smokers.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Runaway health costs are jeopardizing the nation's long-term economic stability and sinking the federal government into deeper debt, Bush administration budget director Richard G. Darman told Congress yesterday.By 2030, America will be working largely to pay its doctor bills if present trends continue, predicted Mr. Darman, director of the Office of Management and Budget. Health spending will overtake Social Security as the biggest item in the federal budget by the turn of the century, he said.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Americans have a growing fear of rising health costs and decreasing medical benefits, a nationwide survey to be released tomorrow shows."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | July 21, 1991
Forms and more forms are an accepted part of health care. But one Columbia firm hopes to convince Fortune 500 companies that it can eliminate all that paper and hold the line on health costs.JSA Health Care, which operates 10 health centers, says it can cut costs by as much as 30 percent. Where a typical health center may file hundreds, even thousands, of forms for a business client each month, JSA files only two.With success in providing inexpensive health care -- most of it, so far, for the military -- JSA is preparing to launch similar healthcenters for large corporations.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Calling Maryland's drug benefit overly generous compared with nearby states and private businesses, the state's budget secretary said yesterday that nearly 100,000 state workers and retirees will soon pay significantly more for prescriptions despite a General Assembly directive freezing health costs. Budget Secretary James C. "Chip" DiPaula Jr. told the Budget and Taxation Committee that charges for drugs will almost certainly increase in January because Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. needs to control spending.
NEWS
By Ned Tillman | June 12, 2014
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy earlier this month announced plans to lower the carbon emissions from our antiquated coal-fired power plants 30 percent by 2030. Much of the justification for this has been focused on the need to slow down global warming, sea level rise and other threats of climate change. But there are many other benefits to Marylanders from reducing our dependence on coal-fired power plants that we need to fully understand so that we can enthusiastically support these new measures and speed up their adoption.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Maryland's health care system faces its greatest transformation in a generation - not because of the state's troubled health insurance exchange or even directly because of the Affordable Care Act but because of a change in the state's decades-old system for compensating hospitals. Under the terms of Maryland's newly updated waiver to Medicare rules, hospitals will make profits by keeping people well and out of their wards rather than by admitting them and treating them when they get sick.
HEALTH
January 22, 2014
Black and Hispanic men are shouldering more medical costs because of health inequalities and they, their families and society are suffering from the burden, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Health disparities among African American men and Hispanic men cost the economy more than $450 billion between 2006 and 2009, the study found. Black men incurred about three quarters of the costs. The study, published in the International Journal of Men's Health, incorporated the direct cost of medical care and the indirect costs such as lower productivity and early death among black, Hispanic, Asian and white men. "These stark findings underscore the fact that we can't afford to overlook men's health disparities that exist in this country," Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., lead author of the study and assistant professor at Hopkins and director of the Program for Research on Men's Health in the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Janis Smith feels a lot healthier - and more confident - since shedding 65 pounds in six months, and that has helped in her job leading employee training for 1st Mariner Bank. "Being in front of a classroom of people … I don't feel like everyone is looking at me, they're listening to what I'm saying versus what I look like," said Smith, 55, a vice president and director for the Baltimore-based bank. "I just have a lot more energy. I have more stamina. I feel like I have a clearer mind.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The federal government is expected to announce its approval Friday of a plan that would allow Maryland to continue setting hospital reimbursement rates for Medicare patients and could become a national model for reducing health care costs. The decision, eagerly anticipated by state officials and hospital executives, allows Maryland to remain the only state in the nation with a waiver from federally set Medicare rates, generally considered the lowest rates paid in every other state.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
The federal Affordable Care Act is expected to provide access to medical coverage to hundreds of thousands of Maryland's uninsured, but one group said that doesn't go far enough. The group, Healthcare is a Human Right-Maryland, led a rally Saturday in Baltimore to push for single-payer coverage similar to that in countries such as Canada and Sweden, where the government runs most of the health system and there are no insurance companies. The health reforms widely known as Obamacare require most people to get insurance.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and Jay Hancock | February 18, 1996
EMPLOYERS and government agencies seem to be winning the war against higher health care costs. Last year, hospital charges, doctor fees, MRI scans and other medical costs rose by 3.9 percent. That was faster than inflation generally but still the smallest upward ratchet for health care since 1972.Is the day of double-digit medical inflation over? Some analysts don't think so. Progress recently has come largely from wringing excessive care out of the system, they say. By refusing to pay for unneeded hospital stays and by forcing doctors to work more efficiently, HMOs and other "managed care" insurers have removed much air from the medical balloon.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and M. Dion Thompson and Gerard Shields and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
The Board of Estimates took a small step toward controlling rising health-care costs yesterday by dropping two of the HMOs available to Baltimore City employees and requiring retirees to pay a larger share of their medical costs. Both changes, which affect thousands of city workers and retirees, had been recommended this month in a consultant's study of ways for the cash-strapped city to cut its health-care costs. The consultant's report detailed proposals for saving the city about $20 million a year.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Bill Kammerzell of Annapolis hoped to enroll in an insurance plan under health reform first thing Tuesday morning but the state's website crashed. The state marketplace where the uninsured could start buying health plans began having problems immediately after its scheduled 8 a.m. launch. Delays continued all day with people still unable to get onto the site by early evening. The exchange was among many across the country with opening day hiccups. "Thank you for visiting Maryland Health Connection," read a notice at the bottom of the website.
NEWS
By Kevin Kamenetz | September 30, 2013
Several years ago, Baltimore County government realized that the runaway costs of employee health care and pension benefits needed to be reined in or our taxpayers would be stuck with a huge bill to pay. The county remains committed to providing quality health care to its employees and retirees, including family benefits with low deductibles. However, in order to control rising health care costs, the county decided that each employee should pay the same cost for health care as every other employee and retiree.
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