Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHealth Committee
IN THE NEWS

Health Committee

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
WASHINGTON - -A game of musical committee chairs in the U.S. Senate ended Wednesday and left Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland right where she is: as the most senior senator without a committee chairmanship. Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin is taking over as head of the Senate health committee, succeeding Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, who died last month at the age of 77. Connecticut Sen. Christopher J. Dodd, who took charge of health legislation while Kennedy struggled with brain cancer, was first in line to chair the committee, formally known as Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A city councilman is pushing a bill that would require every restaurant in Baltimore to post a health grade based on the facility's cleanliness — but some restaurants are pushing back. "We know this policy has been proven across the country to be effective," says City Councilman Brandon Scott, who cites similar efforts in New York, San Francisco and Charlotte, N.C. "It's about transparency. It's about education. It's embarrassing that in 2014 the only way a citizen can see the inspection results in our city is to call 311 and wait for the Health Department to give it to them.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
Behind-the-scenes jostling for committee chairmanships in the U.S. Senate has left Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski poised to take over the Senate Intelligence Committee — a move experts said Tuesday could bolster the role cybersecurity plays in the state's economy. But depending on what more senior lawmakers decide, the Maryland Democrat could also be in line to lead the committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, which oversees the Silver Spring-based Food and Drug Administration and would direct the reauthorization of key education programs.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
Behind-the-scenes jostling for committee chairmanships in the U.S. Senate has left Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski poised to take over the Senate Intelligence Committee — a move experts said Tuesday could bolster the role cybersecurity plays in the state's economy. But depending on what more senior lawmakers decide, the Maryland Democrat could also be in line to lead the committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, which oversees the Silver Spring-based Food and Drug Administration and would direct the reauthorization of key education programs.
NEWS
By FRED SCHULTE and FRED SCHULTE,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Hundreds of complaints against doctors are languishing because the state board set up to discipline physicians can't hire enough investigators to keep up with the caseload, according to the board's director. Testifying before the House Health and Government Operations Committee yesterday, C. Irving Pinder Jr., executive director of the Maryland Board of Physicians, said there is a backlog of about 400 such cases. Complaints about doctors "take too long to get through the process," Pinder told lawmakers.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Del. Marilyn R. Goldwater has been reluctant to say anything about the blood cancer she was diagnosed with six years ago during a routine physical. But with millions of dollars of state money for stem cell research on the line in legislative proposals and a separate plan favored by the governor, Goldwater, 79, went public last week. She took a deep breath and in a matter-of-fact tone, without tears or dramatics, told colleagues on the House Health and Government Operations Committee that she suffers from an incurable disease and needs their help.
NEWS
By Kristina Sherry and Kristina Sherry,Tribune Newspapers | August 3, 2009
WASHINGTON - - As one house of Congress moves toward a September vote on offering insurance to millions of Americans, the other is wading into a controversy over whether such coverage should include billions of dollars aimed at keeping people well. A draft Senate bill would provide up to $10 billion annually for a "prevention and public health investment fund" - a portion of which could be used for infrastructure projects such as bike paths, sidewalks, farmers' markets and other community interventions meant to curb chronic and costly conditions such as obesity.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A city councilman is pushing a bill that would require every restaurant in Baltimore to post a health grade based on the facility's cleanliness — but some restaurants are pushing back. "We know this policy has been proven across the country to be effective," says City Councilman Brandon Scott, who cites similar efforts in New York, San Francisco and Charlotte, N.C. "It's about transparency. It's about education. It's embarrassing that in 2014 the only way a citizen can see the inspection results in our city is to call 311 and wait for the Health Department to give it to them.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
It wasn't the longest speech. Or the fieriest. Certainly not the flashiest. But Peter A. Hammen's remarks to the House of Delegates on the Wal-Mart bill, unquestionably the most-watched legislation Maryland's General Assembly has debated this session, boasted one key point: They came first. As a brand-new committee chairman, one of just six in the 141-member House, speaking first is only the beginning of the political clout that Hammen now can wield in Annapolis. As head of the Health and Government Operations Committee, the Baltimore delegate will help define the course of Maryland health care.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
Advocates of plans to extend health coverage to the state's estimated 690,000 uninsured are beginning to stake out positions in the run-up to the legislative session in Annapolis this winter. The chairman of the House Health and Government Operations Committee plans to release today a new plan to extend health services to the uninsured. Yesterday, the Maryland Citizens Health Initiative, a pro-health coverage group, released a study that it said showed its universal health coverage plan would be good for business.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
WASHINGTON - -A game of musical committee chairs in the U.S. Senate ended Wednesday and left Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland right where she is: as the most senior senator without a committee chairmanship. Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin is taking over as head of the Senate health committee, succeeding Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, who died last month at the age of 77. Connecticut Sen. Christopher J. Dodd, who took charge of health legislation while Kennedy struggled with brain cancer, was first in line to chair the committee, formally known as Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.
NEWS
By Kristina Sherry and Kristina Sherry,Tribune Newspapers | August 3, 2009
WASHINGTON - - As one house of Congress moves toward a September vote on offering insurance to millions of Americans, the other is wading into a controversy over whether such coverage should include billions of dollars aimed at keeping people well. A draft Senate bill would provide up to $10 billion annually for a "prevention and public health investment fund" - a portion of which could be used for infrastructure projects such as bike paths, sidewalks, farmers' markets and other community interventions meant to curb chronic and costly conditions such as obesity.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Del. Marilyn R. Goldwater has been reluctant to say anything about the blood cancer she was diagnosed with six years ago during a routine physical. But with millions of dollars of state money for stem cell research on the line in legislative proposals and a separate plan favored by the governor, Goldwater, 79, went public last week. She took a deep breath and in a matter-of-fact tone, without tears or dramatics, told colleagues on the House Health and Government Operations Committee that she suffers from an incurable disease and needs their help.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
It wasn't the longest speech. Or the fieriest. Certainly not the flashiest. But Peter A. Hammen's remarks to the House of Delegates on the Wal-Mart bill, unquestionably the most-watched legislation Maryland's General Assembly has debated this session, boasted one key point: They came first. As a brand-new committee chairman, one of just six in the 141-member House, speaking first is only the beginning of the political clout that Hammen now can wield in Annapolis. As head of the Health and Government Operations Committee, the Baltimore delegate will help define the course of Maryland health care.
NEWS
By FRED SCHULTE and FRED SCHULTE,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Hundreds of complaints against doctors are languishing because the state board set up to discipline physicians can't hire enough investigators to keep up with the caseload, according to the board's director. Testifying before the House Health and Government Operations Committee yesterday, C. Irving Pinder Jr., executive director of the Maryland Board of Physicians, said there is a backlog of about 400 such cases. Complaints about doctors "take too long to get through the process," Pinder told lawmakers.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
Advocates of plans to extend health coverage to the state's estimated 690,000 uninsured are beginning to stake out positions in the run-up to the legislative session in Annapolis this winter. The chairman of the House Health and Government Operations Committee plans to release today a new plan to extend health services to the uninsured. Yesterday, the Maryland Citizens Health Initiative, a pro-health coverage group, released a study that it said showed its universal health coverage plan would be good for business.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
The Maryland State Medical Society recognizes the health risks of adolescent sleep deprivation and for that reason recommends Maryland adopt later start times in the state's high schools ("Md. school systems study later start times for high schools," March 11). Studies indicate that a modest delay in school start time is associated with significant improvements in adolescent alertness, mood and health. A 2010 study published in the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine offered compelling evidence for the potential benefits of adjusting school schedules to adolescents' sleep needs, circadian rhythms and developmental stage.
NEWS
By Gwen DuBois | December 19, 2013
The students at Benjamin Franklin High School have it right. They have organized against Energy Answers' waste-to-energy incinerator planned for a location within one mile of three schools in Curtis Bay. Not only should it not be built so close to their school, it should not be built at all. Calling it a trash-burning "power plant" doesn't make it safe or change the fact that it incinerates industrial waste including old tires, plastics and construction...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.