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NEWS
May 5, 1992
Dr. Huntington Williams, who as Baltimore's health commissioner for three decades led the campaigns to restrict use of lead paint, fluoridate the water supply and establish a school dental program, died yesterday in his sleep at his home on West University Parkway.He was 99.Services for Dr. Williams, who retired in 1962, will be held at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Charles Street and Melrose Avenue.He suffered what was characterized as a mild stroke two weeks ago.Born in Baltimore, he was educated at the Calvert School, the Gilman School, and St. George's School in Newport, R.I., before attending Harvard College, where he graduated in 1915.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
If there is a good health insurance plan out there for Baltimore scientist Luke Goembel, it's as big a mystery as the space he studies. Goembel, a self-employed physical chemist who has worked for the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and NASA, says he has tried to assess his options on the state's new health insurance exchange. But computer problems have prevented him from getting the user name and password he needs to gain access to the website. He and some advocates for the new marketplace — which aims to cover 800,000 uninsured Marylanders, plus the underinsured — are pressing the state to provide more information on the plans as they wait for glitches to be resolved.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1994
Dr. Maxie T. Collier, a former Baltimore City health commissioner and an early champion of needle-exchange programs to prevent the spread of the virus that causes AIDS among intravenous drug abusers, died early yesterday of a massive heart attack at his home in Northwest Baltimore. He was 49.His death came on the day of a surprise 50th wedding anniversary party he had planned for his parents, Pearlie May and James R. Collier, said Catherine Pugh, a family friend."I will remember Maxie as a brilliant psychiatrist and a caring and compassionate public health official," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday in a statement.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | February 16, 2013
Peter Beilenson — doctor and public health visionary, Baltimore health commissioner, Howard County health officer, quick-study scholar and decoder of federal regulations — remains one of our most interesting men. A person whose leadership has certainly improved the lives of thousands of Marylanders over the last 20 years, from Baltimore heroin addicts to young families in Columbia, Beilenson is now trying to establish a nonprofit health insurance...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Dr. Robert Ennis Farber, a retired family practice physician and former Baltimore health commissioner, died of lung disease Wednesday at his Roland Park home. He was 85. Born in Pierce, W.Va., Dr. Farber was raised in Sparrows Point, where his father practiced medicine. He was a 1936 graduate of Gilman School and earned a chemistry degree from Princeton University. After graduating from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1943, he joined the Navy and was a ship's doctor aboard the USS Karnes, an attack transport that delivered troops for landings in the Pacific island-hopping campaign of World War II. Dr. Farber crossed the Pacific several times and participated in engagements at Okinawa, Saipan and the Marshall Islands.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
Dr. William J. Peeples, who served as Maryland's health commissioner in the late 1960s before taking up a practice in radiation oncology, died of congestive heart failure July 26 at a nursing home in Fort Myers, Fla. The former Timonium resident was 84. Born in Athens, Ga., he earned his medical degree from the University of Georgia. He served in World War II as an Army field surgeon on Okinawa and later remained in the reserves, attaining the rank of colonel. After the war, Dr. Peeples earned a master's degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer Staff writers Michael Ollove, Rafael Alvarez and John W. Frece contributed to this article | December 7, 1992
In a city where mayoral cabinet members are rarely recognized outside of City Hall, Baltimore Health Commissioner Peter Beilenson finds himself quoted on the front pages of national newspapers, pursued by television networks.Not bad for a guy who's been in office just over a month.Dr. Beilenson didn't think it was big news last week when The Sun reported that he's organized a consortium of Baltimore doctors, hospitals and foundations to promote Norplant, the five-year contraceptive, among teen-agers.
NEWS
February 27, 1999
Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner, took himself out of the running yesterday for the post of District of Columbia health director. Beilenson, 39, had been recruited for the job and was one of two finalists. He said he lost interest because the process had dragged on for 3 1/2 months."It was putting my family in limbo and causing some disruption in the city health department," Beilenson said. "I just decided that with the chaos in D.C. right now and other factors, I should stay in Baltimore."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Flu season will soon peak, and Baltimore's health commissioner is urging sick people to stay home instead of flooding into emergency rooms. Many of the city's emergency departments are on "yellow alert," meaning they will soon be full. The remaining space should be reserved for the extremely ill, children and the elderly, said Dr. Peter Beilenson, the health commissioner. "There is nothing that can be done for the flu in the emergency room," Beilenson said. "If you are youngish and generally healthy, call your doctor first and then take care of it at home so you don't spread it in emergency room waiting rooms."
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
As a pediatrician-in-training at Boston Medical Center in 1997, Joshua Sharfstein stood out among the other aspiring doctors by making house calls in poor neighborhoods. What Sharfstein discovered on those in-home visits led him to co-write a report showing that deplorable housing conditions can severely harm the health of children. The study, which Sharfstein undertook at age 28, grabbed national attention, garnered praise from the federal government's top housing official, and confirmed expectations set by an award that identified him as a potential public health leader while he was a Harvard Medical School student.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Baltimore's former health commissioner has come out with a way that just might get regular people to care about public policy -- he mixes in a heavy dose of "The Wire. " Dr. Peter Beilenson, who's now Howard County's chief health officer has written a book with journalist Patrick McGuire called "Tapping into The Wire: The Real Urban Crisis. " Each chapter is a different scene from the beloved HBO show, but with the storylines broadened to examine public policy questions. Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press, the 232-pager comes out Sept.
NEWS
May 14, 2011
Baltimore City Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot unveiled an ambitious initiative this week aimed at improving the overall health of Baltimore citizens by 2015. It sets practical goals for reducing the most serious health risks and acknowledges that achieving them will take the combined efforts of the city's hospitals, schools, social services agencies, foundations and private businesses. If it works, it will be a major achievement for Dr. Barbot, who arrived in Baltimore a year ago. But the plan is maddeningly short on details about how such a complex collaboration would actually work and who would direct the effort.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
City officials said Tuesday that they've revamped Baltimore's struggling program to remove lead-paint poisoning hazards from housing after losing a $3.9 million federal grant, and intend to reapply soon for federal funds to underwrite the effort. A children's health advocate, meanwhile, disputed the city health commissioner's explanation for the grant loss at a City Council hearing into the funding cutoff, and warned that the city must improve its management of the effort to help landlords and homeowners reduce lead-paint risks in their homes.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
The city will offer a series of free health fairs, blood-pressure screenings and walks - including a workout with Ravens running back Ray Rice - later this month as part of Healthy City Days, a new public health awareness campaign. The five-day series of events is intended to bridge the "stark disparities" between the health of the city's poorest residents and of those who live in wealthier neighborhoods, said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. A health department study showed that residents of some communities have an average life expectancy of less than 60 years, while in other neighborhoods, the life expectancy exceeded 80. "We hope to show people that you do not need lots of time or expensive equipment to live a healthy life," Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday at a news conference at the C.C. Jackson recreation center in Park Heights.
NEWS
July 19, 2010
The Baltimore City Council showed wisdom when it voted recently to restore funding for health centers in the city's public schools. Few investments are more beneficial in terms of preventing illness and making schools more conducive to learning. Fully funding the health centers is also an excellent way to welcome Baltimore's new health commissioner, who established her reputation running the health department for New York's 1.1 million-student school system. Funding for the city's 13 school health centers will come in part from additional revenue raised from new taxes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 29, 2009
Dr. John Burling DeHoff, a Baltimore internist who later served as the city's health commissioner for nearly a decade, died Monday of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 96. Born in Baltimore into a medical family, Dr. DeHoff's father, grandfather and great uncle, were physicians. He was raised in Charles Village and attended the Marston's University School for Boys and was a 1931 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1935 and his medical degree, also from Hopkins, in 1939.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
When he took over as Baltimore health commissioner, Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein says, he was unsure whether he would last three days. Recalling that beginning in a letter to friends and colleagues this month, he described the public health challenges facing the city as "awesome" and named a few: young mothers unable to get needed support before, during and after pregnancy; thousands of residents who can't access drug treatment; tens of thousands shut out...
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1997
Stung by the type of national attention no city wants, Baltimore's health commissioner branded as unfair a Harvard study that found the city had some of the worst life expectancies in a comparison of 2,077 locales across the country.The study, by Dr. Christopher Murray of the Harvard University School of Public Health, found that Baltimore had the third-shortest life expectancy for men and the second-shortest for women. Life expectancy for men was 63.04 years; for women, it was 73.27 years.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
The Baltimore City Council is set to hold hearings today on three pieces of legislation that would further restrict smoking in the city, causing some in the council to predict some heated debates in the coming months. Council members will hear the pros and cons of a proposed bill to ban the sale of single cigars, one that prohibits flavored cigar and cigarette wrappers and legislation to ban smoking near hospitals. "Generally, anything we do is focused on reducing cardiovascular disease," said Interim Health Commissioner Olivia Farrow, whose department supports all three measures.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
When he took over as Baltimore health commissioner, Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein says, he was unsure whether he would last three days. Recalling that beginning in a letter to friends and colleagues this month, he described the public health challenges facing the city as "awesome" and named a few: young mothers unable to get needed support before, during and after pregnancy; thousands of residents who can't access drug treatment; tens of thousands shut out...
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