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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | September 20, 1991
An article yesterday about the governor's AIDS Advisory council misstated Mr. Schaefer's reference to opposition to legislation that would require many health care workers and patients to undergo testing for the AIDS virus. Actually, he said he realized that some members objected to testing and that it was generally controversial among the council.+ The Sun regrets the errors.Gov. William Donald Schaefer told his new AIDS Advisory Council yesterday that he intends to propose legislation requiring many health-care workers and patients to get tested for the AIDS virus -- even though he realizes that most of the council members disagree.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 2, 2014
"This is not West Africa," Texas health commissioner Dr. David Lakey said Wednesday at a news conference designed to dispel Texans' (and Americans') fear of an Ebola outbreak after a man there was diagnosed with the disease. "This is a very sophisticated city, a very sophisticated hospital. " The subtext: All those gruesome photos you're seeing of people dying in the streets in West Africa — that's something that happens over there, to other people, not here, not to us. But what the events of the last few days have shown is that it's exactly that kind of hubris that puts us most at risk, and that for all the sophistication of the U.S. health system, it only takes a simple lapse to create the conditions for a broader outbreak.
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NEWS
September 2, 2010
In my 21 years as a patient care technician at the University of Maryland Medical Center, I've known many co-workers who are paid so little that they are forced to live in public housing, can't afford health care for their own kids and rely on food stamps to feed their families. So when I found out that the former CEO of the University of Maryland Medical System was paid almost $8 million in one year alone ("Hospital CEO pay is sweet," Aug. 29), I nearly fell out of my chair. This seems to be a symptom of a larger problem in America, where Wall Street, big banks and CEOs make millions while working families struggle to just make ends meet.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
A recent report that a runaway Sierre Leone Ebola patient had been located but died in the ambulance on the way to the hospital is good news for the wrong reasons. Maybe this incident will help members of the community understand that Ebola is not a gimmick aimed at carrying out "cannibalistic rituals. " As a Nigerian-American who spent most of my adolescence in Nigeria, I am not surprised at the mistrust of health care workers or at the misconceptions surrounding the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
Hundreds of health care workers — many who say they can't afford care from the hospitals where they're employed — demanded better wages and benefits at a rally Thursday where actor and activist Danny Glover was on hand to back their cause. Some workers came from work, still dressed in scrubs, to tell their stories about juggling bills to make it on small salaries. Many talked about holding side jobs. They were nurse's assistants, laundry workers and those who check in patients and serve them food.
HEALTH
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Meagan Shipley, a nurse in the Baltimore City Health Department, works at a family planning clinic during the day and helps provide health care to workers on The Block in the evenings. When she was contacted by photographer Carolyn Jones to be part of a new coffee-table book, "The American Nurse," she agreed, hoping to publicize the work the city is doing to help workers in Baltimore's strip-club hub "A lot of people want to write off [Block workers]," she says. "I hate this attitude.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- She sat in her wheelchair, still and expressionless, as if oblivious to the massive curtain of reporters and photographers that shrouded her as she was wheeled into the packed congressional hearing room.But solemn and stone-faced as she was, 23-year-old Kimberly Bergalis was not oblivious. When it was time for her to speak yesterday morning, the young woman -- her nearly skeletal body sapped by acquired immune deficiency syndrome -- told members of Congress what she'd traveled 19 hours to say."
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | June 25, 1991
Contractual health-care workers who treat prison inmates may be required to undergo testing for the AIDS virus if the procedures they perform create a "significant risk" for transmitting the virus.The testing may be required if the health-care providers "regularlyengage in medical procedures that could expose patients to their blood and if the medical evidence shows that patients are subject to a 'significant risk,' " Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. wrote in an opinion to Gov. William Donald Schaefer that was made public today.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and David Nitkin and Tim Craig and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced yesterday that the state health department will begin inoculating 6,000 health care workers against smallpox this week in the first phase of a three-pronged strategy for protecting Maryland from a biological attack. The second phase, which could begin this year, involves vaccinating the rest of the health care work force, including doctors and nurses, emergency medical personnel and health department officials. The final phase is to begin next year, when the vaccine will be made available to the public on a voluntary basis.
NEWS
By Vicki Kemper and Vicki Kemper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - Top government officials implored health-care workers yesterday to volunteer for smallpox vaccinations, telling them that the threat of a bioterrorist attack is real, that it is their public duty to be prepared, and that the government will compensate them for any injuries. "This is an unprecedented time in our history," said Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, referring to the threat of terrorist attacks against the United States and the prospect of a U.S. war against Iraq.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Legislation aimed at reducing acts of violence against health-care workers is poised for final passage in Annapolis. Identical bills have passed the House and Senate that would require health-care facilities to conduct an annual risk assessment and document all violent workplace incidents. Annual training for staff and post-incident support for affected caregivers also would be mandated. One chamber must pass the other's bill for it to go to the governor's desk for signature. The legislation is the culmination of a push begun last year by workers seeking to reduce the number of assaults in Maryland hospitals and nursing homes.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown is expected to collect the endorsement of one of the most powerful unions in Maryland Monday in his race for the 2014 Democratic nomination for governor. Brown is expected to be on hand when the Service Employees International Union announces its choice in the race to succeed term-limited Gov. Martin O'Malley at the Baltimore Urban League. The SEIU is one of the state's largest unions, representing more than 30,000 public employees, health care workers, security workers and janitors in Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Just to answer the dated tan plastic phone at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, you have to take an annual two-hour course. And when it rings, with its two-tone signal like an old British ambulance, everyone pays attention. A voice on the other end, an EMT somewhere in Maryland, rattles through the need-to-knows over a speaker: age, gender, and manner, severity and location of injuries. Whether a patient is lethargic, immobilized, disoriented or unresponsive. All is scribbled shorthand onto translucent marker board, known to all as “the board,” as a crowd of staff looks on. The board reads as a preview of what's to come for the doctors, nurses and other staff of Shock Trauma, and what they already have on their hands.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
A new report by the National Patient Safety Foundation published in the AMA News found that health care workers are toiling in hazardous environments where they are subjected to physical and verbal abuse from colleagues and exposed to relentless stress generated by administrative greed. The push to see more patients in less time has placed doctors and nurses at breaking point. Many are burning out and losing the joy inherent in practicing a humane profession. The patient-doctor relationship has been decimated with insurers and the government playing doctor in lieu of health-care providers.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Legislation to strengthen violence prevention standards at health care facilities across the state has been withdrawn in the Senate - ending its chances for passage in Annapolis this session. Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, a Baltimore County Democrat and the bill's sponsor, said she submitted a withdrawal letter to the finance committee Monday after stakeholders representing nursing homes and assisted living facilities expressed concerns that it would not leave room for individualized approaches to dealing with violence in varying clinical environments.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 2, 1991
Viewers may notice something strange about tonight's "48 Hours" broadcast on health care workers with AIDS: CBS News abandons the program's usual format.Instead of going on-location for two days (in television time) of intense subject coverage, tonight's show (8 p.m., Channel 11) is a series of reports from various cities and without any time-frame. The reports (at least those included in an unfinished preview tape) are grouped around two issues: health care providers with AIDS who keep that information from their patients; and the difficulty AIDS patients have finding doctors and dentists willing to treat them.
NEWS
September 19, 2010
The natural question after Dr. David Cohen was shot Thursday by the disgruntled son of patient was how the man was able to bring a handgun into the hospital in the first place. And the answer is something the thousands of people who work at Hopkins — and most any other big hospital — are all too aware of: There are no metal detectors, and the screening of patients and visitors is generally cursory at best. The head of Hopkins security said after the incident that metal detectors are extremely rare in hospitals and that installing them in a place like Hopkins, which has some 80 entrances, would be logistically difficult.
HEALTH
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Meagan Shipley, a nurse in the Baltimore City Health Department, works at a family planning clinic during the day and helps provide health care to workers on The Block in the evenings. When she was contacted by photographer Carolyn Jones to be part of a new coffee-table book, "The American Nurse," she agreed, hoping to publicize the work the city is doing to help workers in Baltimore's strip-club hub "A lot of people want to write off [Block workers]," she says. "I hate this attitude.
NEWS
By Ellie Dominguez and Madison Farley | October 11, 2012
Thursday marks the International Day of the Girl. As part of Garrison Forest School's Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) partnership with the Johns Hopkins University, we spent this past spring and summer as the first interns at Jhpiego, the JHU-affiliated nonprofit addressing health issues of girls, women and their families worldwide. We talked via email and Skype with girls around the globe and discovered just how similar our perspectives are. The GirlSpot posts we wrote for the Jhpiego Facebook page detail these common bonds — and highlight the differences in our lives, differences that often have tragic consequences for our global peers.
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