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NEWS
February 29, 2012
I don't want to pay for other people's contraceptives, abortifacients and abortions. Further, I don't want to be forced to participate in insurance plans which mandate the provision of abortions and other services to which I am morally opposed. We should have the liberty to abstain from such programs and choose other plans from a competitive insurance marketplace. The federal government is limited to enumerated powers by the Constitution, which means the states are free to establish their own insurance laws and regulations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 6, 2013
For more than 30 years, the federal government has allowed Maryland to operate by different rules from other states when it comes to the way Medicare pays for hospital services. So long as the state managed to keep the growth in the average cost for each hospital admission of a Medicare patient below the average for the nation, the feds would agree to pay the same, higher rate that private insurers do for hospital services. In general, it has worked out well. When Maryland first received its Medicare waiver in the late 1970s, the average cost per admission was 25 percent higher than the national average.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2000
With Carroll's rapidly growing senior population, county officials can expect demands for more health care services, less costly prescriptions, improved transportation and even discounts on garbage collection. "The age wave is coming and it is going to need services," Michael R. Lachance, a legislative liaison for the Maryland Department of Aging, told Carroll officials during a town meeting on senior needs at Westminster Senior Center yesterday. About 75 people attended the three-hour meeting.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | September 18, 2013
The annual federal-budget fight is under way, and to reduce the deficit, Republicans want to slash Medicare, Social Security and other government services while delaying or killing the Affordable Care Act, which begins to take full effect next month. They're willing to devastate tens of millions of Americans. Still, as always, one government program that wastes hundreds of millions of dollars each and every year is certain to sail through Congress without question or qualm. That's the annual appropriation for the United States Agency for International Development's Afghanistan aid programs.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2013
John Hopkins Medicine International entered into a collaboration with a network of Peruvian hospitals in an effort to improve medical services in the area. The deal with Pacífico S.A. Entidad Prestadora de Salud also includes making improvements at an oncology clinic, clinical and pathology laboratories and outpatient centers that have recently been acquired by Pacífico Salud. One of the main goals of the partnership will be accreditation of the hospitals. The organizations will also work on strengthening patient safety, operation and the infrastructure for delivering care.  “This important endeavor is designed to raise the quality of health care services across a vast and committed corps of caregivers,” Steven J. Thompson, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine International, said in a statement. 
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
Integrated Health Services Inc. churned out record revenues of $278.4 million in the second quarter, up 101 percent from a year ago, as it converted more health care beds to ones that are reimbursed by the government at a higher rate.The low-cost provider of health care services earned $13.9 million before extraordinary items, up 104 percent from a year ago. Earnings per share before extraordinary items were up 35 percent, to 54 cents a share.This is the 18th consecutive quarter that the Owings Mills-based company has chalked up record revenues and earnings, officials said.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Stuart Butler's op-ed ("An enterprising approach to health," Feb. 29) on what our proposed Health Enterprise Zones (HEZs) can learn from urban "economic" enterprise zones is a valuable critique. His focus on incentives, innovation and community partnerships echoes the strengths of our legislation, the Maryland Health Improvement and Disparities Reduction Act. Like economic enterprise zones, we intend to blanket a distressed community with incentives that draw in the expert people and quality services needed to address a specific problem: health disparities among underserved communities.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
Manor Care Inc.'s profit before one-time special charges jumped 15 percent to $23.6 million in its fiscal first quarter, the company said yesterday.The Gaithersburg-based health care concern reported earning 37 cents a share from continuing health care real estate operations and discontinued health care services operations, compared with earnings of $20.3 million, or 32 cents a share, in the corresponding period a year earlier.Manor Care's stock slipped 56 cents a share to $32.69 yesterday.
BUSINESS
By TYEESHA DIXON and TYEESHA DIXON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Ernst & Young has announced its Maryland winners for the 2006 Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award. The winners, who are eligible for the national contest, were chosen from 25 state finalists. Winners, announced last month, were chosen by six Maryland judges, from area business, academic and civic organizations. Criteria for selecting winners were based on company growth, innovation and community involvement, a spokeswoman said. Winners include: Construction services: Mark Richardson, president, Case Design/Remodeling Inc. Consumer and retail products: Brad MacDonald, chairman and chief executive officer, Medifast Inc. Financial services: Gary Marino, CEO, I4 Commerce.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | May 13, 2007
Older adults, people with mental illnesses and low-income individuals in Howard County should see improved health care services over the next few years under a new $3 million partnership between the Horizon Foundation and Howard County General Hospital. After several years of planning, the Community Health Partnership officially took shape last week with a commitment of $950,000 over four years from Horizon -- the largest grant in that philanthropy's nine-year history -- and $2.1 million from the hospital.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2013
John Hopkins Medicine International entered into a collaboration with a network of Peruvian hospitals in an effort to improve medical services in the area. The deal with Pacífico S.A. Entidad Prestadora de Salud also includes making improvements at an oncology clinic, clinical and pathology laboratories and outpatient centers that have recently been acquired by Pacífico Salud. One of the main goals of the partnership will be accreditation of the hospitals. The organizations will also work on strengthening patient safety, operation and the infrastructure for delivering care.  “This important endeavor is designed to raise the quality of health care services across a vast and committed corps of caregivers,” Steven J. Thompson, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine International, said in a statement. 
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Like a one-two punch, two major Maryland employers in the health care service and pharmaceutical industries were the targets last week of multibillion-dollar acquisition deals. Both homegrown companies — Human Genome Sciences Inc. and Catalyst Health Solutions Inc. — are based in Rockville. Both were courted by out-of-state companies. Human Genome ultimately rebuffed a $2.6 billion offer by biopharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, saying it was too low. But Catalyst agreed to be acquired by a larger Illinois competitor for $4.4 billion, and Human Genome has officially acknowledged it's on the market.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Stuart Butler's op-ed ("An enterprising approach to health," Feb. 29) on what our proposed Health Enterprise Zones (HEZs) can learn from urban "economic" enterprise zones is a valuable critique. His focus on incentives, innovation and community partnerships echoes the strengths of our legislation, the Maryland Health Improvement and Disparities Reduction Act. Like economic enterprise zones, we intend to blanket a distressed community with incentives that draw in the expert people and quality services needed to address a specific problem: health disparities among underserved communities.
NEWS
February 29, 2012
I don't want to pay for other people's contraceptives, abortifacients and abortions. Further, I don't want to be forced to participate in insurance plans which mandate the provision of abortions and other services to which I am morally opposed. We should have the liberty to abstain from such programs and choose other plans from a competitive insurance marketplace. The federal government is limited to enumerated powers by the Constitution, which means the states are free to establish their own insurance laws and regulations.
NEWS
By Diana Carvajal and Eva Moore | January 23, 2009
Before this week, when an uninsured Baltimore woman needed contraception, she had an open door to affordable, confidential services. She could go to her local family planning clinic to receive comprehensive reproductive health care services. But thanks to a last-minute rule change ordered by the departing Bush administration, this is no longer the case. Now, care can be denied if a doctor, a nurse - even a receptionist - has a moral objection to a woman's legal right to contraception or other sexual health services.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | May 13, 2007
Older adults, people with mental illnesses and low-income individuals in Howard County should see improved health care services over the next few years under a new $3 million partnership between the Horizon Foundation and Howard County General Hospital. After several years of planning, the Community Health Partnership officially took shape last week with a commitment of $950,000 over four years from Horizon -- the largest grant in that philanthropy's nine-year history -- and $2.1 million from the hospital.
NEWS
By Diana Carvajal and Eva Moore | January 23, 2009
Before this week, when an uninsured Baltimore woman needed contraception, she had an open door to affordable, confidential services. She could go to her local family planning clinic to receive comprehensive reproductive health care services. But thanks to a last-minute rule change ordered by the departing Bush administration, this is no longer the case. Now, care can be denied if a doctor, a nurse - even a receptionist - has a moral objection to a woman's legal right to contraception or other sexual health services.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Manor Care Inc. has taken control of In Home Health Inc., a major supplier of home health care services.The transaction announced yesterday gives Silver Spring-based Manor Care, which specializes in nursing home services, entry into the rapidly expanding home health industry.In Home Health, based in Minneapolis, does business in 13 states and has annual revenues of $130 million. It provides skilled nursing, rehabilitation, personal care and other services to patients in their own homes.Manor Care operates 193 facilities with 26,000 beds in 28 states.
BUSINESS
By TYEESHA DIXON and TYEESHA DIXON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Ernst & Young has announced its Maryland winners for the 2006 Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award. The winners, who are eligible for the national contest, were chosen from 25 state finalists. Winners, announced last month, were chosen by six Maryland judges, from area business, academic and civic organizations. Criteria for selecting winners were based on company growth, innovation and community involvement, a spokeswoman said. Winners include: Construction services: Mark Richardson, president, Case Design/Remodeling Inc. Consumer and retail products: Brad MacDonald, chairman and chief executive officer, Medifast Inc. Financial services: Gary Marino, CEO, I4 Commerce.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
The state did a poor job of providing medical care to prisoners at Baltimore's downtown prison over much of the past five years because of a flawed and underfunded contract with a private company that took effect in 2000, according to a grand jury report released yesterday. But the report, which supports findings of a Sun investigation published this year, credits the Ehrlich administration for its efforts to come up with an innovative solution to the problems through a new set of medical care contracts that state officials signed in June.
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