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EXPLORE
January 13, 2012
St. Agnes Hospital was one of 11 medical institutions recognized by the Emergency Medical Technology program in the School of Health Professions at the Community College of Baltimore County. In addition to the Baltimore hospital at Wilkens and Caton avenues, the other institutions that received plaques from the school were Franklin Square Hospital, Harford Memorial Hospital, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Maryland Poison Center - University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Mercy Medical Center, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, Sinai Hospital, St. Joseph Medical Center, University of Maryland Medical Center and Upper Chesapeake Medical Center "These sites provide valuable experiences to our students that could not be duplicated in the classroom," said Deanna Wiseman, CCBC EMT program clinical coordinator, in a release.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 26, 2012
Baltimore Medical System won a nearly half-million grant to develop a program for patients with both chronic diseases and behavior health needs. The $498,906 from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield will be used to develop a unique-in-the-state turn on patient centered medical homes, a model where a team of providers work to achieve better quality care for lower costs by coordinating patient care. The participants in this program will get integrated care blending primary care, psychiatric care, low-threshold counseling and social services.
NEWS
By THERESA SHAVER AND ADRIENNE OLECK | May 14, 2006
During the Katrina disaster, Robbie Prepas, a certified nurse midwife from California, delivered five babies in the New Orleans Airport and twins in an ambulance en route to Baton Rouge. She triaged several hundred pregnant moms by listening to their fetal heartbeats, providing antenatal and postpartum care. "I have worked in disaster situations all over the world, and Hurricane Katrina was the worst I have ever been involved in," said Ms. Prepas, a member of the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
After months of negotiations, one strike and the threat of another, and intervention from the governor, Johns Hopkins Hospital and 2,000 service workers reached a tentative labor agreement early Tuesday that some said could become an "important benchmark" for the health care industry. The deal, which is to be submitted to the workers for a vote, came after seven hours of negotiations that ended at 2 a.m. It would affect housekeepers, cooks, janitors, surgical technicians and others.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
The anguished mother pounded the floor at Johns Hopkins Hospital, screaming, "Why, why, why?" Dr. John Wogan had just told her as gently as he knew how that her teenage son was dead, the victim of a stray bullet fired on the streets of Baltimore. The next day the mother was dead herself, felled by a burst blood vessel in her brain that Wogan believes resulted from the terrible, sudden stress of learning her child was gone. Twenty years later the episode remains etched in the doctor's memory.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1994
Faced with a deluge of opposition from angry doctors and health maintenance organizations, a state planning panel yesterday scrapped the idea of a six-month moratorium on new outpatient surgery centers.The chairman of the Maryland Health Resources Planning Commission, Marcia G. Pines, said its decision was not a signal to health care providers to flood the panel with applications to open the freestanding centers.If they do, she said, the planning staff would be unable to focus on the topic that prompted the proposed ban -- the financial impact of such centers on traditional providers and the need to devise a new health care delivery system in Maryland.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Public service video to show mobile clinic Mission of Mercy, the mobile medical clinic that makes several stops in Carroll County, is featured in a new video produced by Towson University. The video will be shown to service organizations, churches and civic groups in Mission of Mercy's service area, said David Liddle, chief executive officer. "Anyone who wants to know more about the health problems faced by the increasing of the uninsured should contact us," Liddle said. "By the time patients get to Mission of Mercy, they are desperate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 2007
BOSTON -- State health officials across New England are on alert after dozens of cases of mumps have been confirmed or suspected in Maine. Fifteen cases have been confirmed in Maine since September, and 57 more are suspected, said Geoff Beckett, the assistant state epidemiologist. While no cases have been confirmed in other New England states since September, officials fear the disease could spread quickly, particularly because of the region's abundance of college students, who are thought to be at particular risk.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
At least once a year, executives from Ciena Corp. spend a day at Johns Hopkins Hospital getting poked and prodded as they undergo tests for a barrage of potential ailments, from anemia to prostate cancer. They aren't necessarily feeling ill or showing any symptoms. In fact, the executives of Linthicum-based Ciena are often healthy — and their company wants to keep it that way. The $2,000-per-person prices for these full-body examinations are considered an essential corporate expense.
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