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NEWS
December 16, 1990
Proper DoubtsEditor: If Rudolph Almaraz kept silent about having AIDS because he doubted the ability of the news media, Johns Hopkins and the public, including his own patients, to react without hysteria, he was certainly justified. The sensationalism with which this story has been approached only confirms the validity of that decision.The Sun acts irresponsibly by legitimizing reactions of panic, in view of the extreme unlikelihood of the doctor having transmitted the disease to his patients.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Maryland public health officials are putting caregivers - from Baltimore's major teaching hospitals to strip-mall urgent care centers to ambulances - on heightened alert for signs of Ebola as details emerge about missteps in Dallas, where a man with the deadly virus was initially sent home from a hospital. Health care providers have for months been preparing for Ebola's potential arrival in the U.S., and on Tuesday confirmed a Liberian man visiting family in Dallas had the virus.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2002
Nonprofit mental health care providers warned yesterday that they're in danger of going out of business unless the state puts more money into the system and starts paying its bills more quickly. "If you don't do something, you won't have any clinics left," Craig Knoll, executive director of Threshold Services in Montgomery County, told lawmakers. "We're waiting until April 8," the last day of the General Assembly session, Knoll said. "If the right things happen, we'll keep the clinics open.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Former Catonsville doctor William Dando will not face trial for sexual assault allegations after agreeing never to practice medicine in Maryland again. Allegany County prosecutors dropped charges against him Tuesday, citing two factors — the "he said, she said" nature of the case and his decision to surrender his medical license. Dando had been scheduled to stand trial Wednesday in an incident in which a 41-year-old patient said he touched her genitals while treating her for an ear infection at an urgent-care center near Cumberland.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Maryland health care providers - particularly nursing homes, pharmacists and adult day care centers - told the House Health and Government Operations Committee yesterday that the latest round of state budget cuts hits them disproportionately, and could lead to reductions in quality and in patient access. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced, and the Board of Public Works approved, $208.4 million in cuts to state spending for the fiscal year; of that, $88.3 million is from the health budget.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Rape is a notoriously difficult crime to prosecute. Of every 100 rapes nationwide, 46 are reported, 12 lead to arrests and three result in prison sentences. To improve those odds, advocates are encouraging more nurses to receive the training to give a forensic examination that can be key to securing a conviction. Prosecutions are difficult when a victim fails to get a prompt examination. And with TV crime dramas such as "CSI" raising expectations among juries, prosecutors and victims' advocates view the forensic exam as more essential than ever.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore | June 23, 2011
The state has assembled a work group of top health professionals to come up with ways to reduce health disparities among racial and ethnic groups, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown announced Thursday. The seven-member panel, to be headed by Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, will identify new legislation and financial incentives that can be used to bring equality to healthcare. While studies have shown the overall life expectancy in the United States has improved, there are still large differences between the health of minorities and that of whites.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland yesterday won the right to set the rates it pays doctors and other health care providers.The state Senate unanimously passed a bill, already approved by the House of Delegates, that frees Blue Cross from oversight from the state insurance commissioner over provider rates.Some providers had opposed the legislation, but the insurance commissioner, Dwight K. Bartlett III, told legislators that reviews of fees by his office -- a regulatory mechanism dating from the 1930s -- are no longer needed in the current health marketplace.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1997
United Payors & United Providers Inc., a Rockville company that provides health insurers a national network of health care providers, said yesterday that it will buy America's Health Plan Inc. for $14.75 million.Publicly held UP&UP said AHP, which operates a network of health care providers nationwide, should significantly improve its earnings in 1998.UP&UP, which employs about 400, posted a net profit of $10.6 million on $35.2 million in revenue in 1996.Ed Civera, president and chief operating officer of the fast-growing company, which expects to post revenue of about $60 million this year, said the deal is part of UP&UP's plan to selectively acquire preferred provider organizations and other health care outfits as part of a growth strategy.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 2, 2013
Maryland has received a $375,000 federal grant to help launch a program to curb domestic violence, state officials announced Wednesday. The state is one of six that received grant money, which it will use on  a program to help health care providers play a larger role in helping those who may have been victims of domestic violence. Under the program to launch later this month, health care providers will have access to training to help identify and assist domestic violence victims.
NEWS
By Janet Simon Schreck | August 21, 2014
While the roles of depression and addiction in Robin William's suicide were the focus of most news stories about his death, perhaps the headlines should have focused on his recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, highlighting the intricate relationships between neurological diseases and mental health conditions. The U.S. health care system is woefully inadequate at addressing the overlap between the body, mind and soul in these patients. The anatomical, physiological and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with neurological disorders - such as stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease - can exacerbate or worsen previously existing mental health conditions including depression and anxiety.
NEWS
By Marion Subah | August 19, 2014
Monrovia, Liberia - We sat in a waiting room of a health clinic here, talking about our fears. As a midwifery and nursing educator working in Liberia for Jhpiego, a Johns Hopkins University affiliate, I had been asked to help update health workers on the critical skills and interventions essential to managing Ebola cases. I was prepared to talk about the disease - what it is, how to care for patients and how to prevent it from spreading. But before I could do that, I knew we had to talk about how terrifying the job is. A nurse sitting across from me spoke candidly about his first experience with an Ebola patient - he didn't want to have any physical contact with the person, he was so terrified.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 28, 2014
As Harford County and state health agencies track West Nile virus and other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, such as chikungunya and dengue viruses, the Harford County Health Department cautions residents to take appropriate measures to reduce their risk of infection. According to the health department, people can reduce the risk of being infected with WNV by using insect repellent and wearing protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites. "Prevention is key and there are actions individuals can take to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne infection," Harford County Health Officer Susan Kelly said in a release.
NEWS
By Darrell Gaskin | July 27, 2014
The Potomac River has long been a symbolic divide between two states with divergent histories and politics. Today, the difference between Virginia and Maryland plays out in Medicaid coverage. In Maryland, low-income workers - adults living alone making $15,552 a year or less, or a family of four earning less than $31,720 - are eligible for Medicaid. In Virginia, workers with these incomes or lower are most likely uninsured. That's because the Virginia legislature last month rejected Gov. Terry McAuliffe's appeal to expand Medicaid to cover this group.
HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Almost 30 years ago, Health Care for the Homeless was founded in Baltimore to help people "falling through the cracks" of the health care system; now the organization has created a program to ensure that people don't fall through the cracks of its own system. "We needed to make sure we were getting beyond these four walls," said the organization's CEO Kevin Lindamood, as he sat in the organization's clinic at 421 Fallsway. "To serve those that are so vulnerable they're not able to make it here.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
After months of negotiations, one strike and the threat of another, and intervention from the governor, Johns Hopkins Hospital and 2,000 service workers reached a tentative labor agreement early Tuesday that some said could become an "important benchmark" for the health care industry. The deal, which is to be submitted to the workers for a vote, came after seven hours of negotiations that ended at 2 a.m. It would affect housekeepers, cooks, janitors, surgical technicians and others.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Hospitals and other health care providers who responded to demands for more rural health clinics, hospices and health care in the home for Medicare patients say they are stymied in offering these services because they cannot get approval from federal regulators.Because of budget cuts, federal and state officials say, they have a huge, growing backlog of health care providers awaiting certification to participate in Medicare.Matters will only worsen, they say, as Republicans in Congress cut the budget for such regulatory activity, while encouraging doctors and hospitals to form new health plans to serve Medicare patients.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1998
United Payors & United Providers Inc., a Rockville-based financial services company supporting the health care industry, said yesterday that it acquired ProAmerica, an operating subsidiary of UnitedHealth Group, for an undisclosed sum.ProAmerica, an Arlington, Texas-based network of health care providers, is expected to record revenue of about $13 million in 1998.The combined operations of UP&UP and ProAmerica are expected to exceed $100 million in revenue in 1999, said Ed Civera, UP&UP president and chief operating officer.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 3, 2014
Down with stakeholders. The American Academy of Pediatrics has come out against affordable health care for kids. Retail medical clinics -- at drugstores, Walmarts, etc. -- are cropping up across the nation, thanks in part to the expected longer waiting times and out-of-pocket expenses stemming from Obamacare. And the pediatricians don't like it. "While retail clinics may be more convenient and less costly, the AAP said they are detrimental to the concept of a 'medical home,' where patients have a personal physician who knows them well and coordinates all their care," reported the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
Health care group purchasing organizations (GPOs) are taking a variety of innovative steps to mitigate the impact of generic drug shortages. All GPO contracts are voluntary and the product of competitive market negotiations. All hospitals can purchase "off contract" and often do. Contracts can be canceled and pricing regularly adjusted. Manufacturers regularly and quickly adjust pricing of GPO contracts when they experience shocks to production. ( "GPOs fuel drug shortages," Feb. 7)
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